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Thread: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

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    Default China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

    China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike
    Hong Kong's Xin-bao reported on July 7th that China has deployed next-generation nuclear submarines and is capable of second nuclear counterstrike.

    German military publication 'International Navy' reported that China officially deployed recently-developed Type 093 and 094 nuclear submarines, and conducted training exercises. They are in combat-deployment now, according to the publication.

    It said that Type 094, Tang-class, is the improved version of Xia-class nuclear submarine, with 10,000-ton displacement, and can carry 16 Julang-2 SLBMs which have the range of 10,000 km. Each Julang-2 can have three nuclear-warheads, which means that a single Type 094 submarine can strike 48 targets simultaneously.

    Type 094 has fourth-generation nuclear reactor and is equipped with noise-suppression feature and precision sonar capability. It has superior stealth, mobility, and survivability, which is rated as comparable to Ohio-class submarine of U.S.

    Type 093 is an attack submarine with 7,150 ton displacement , whose design is based on Han-class submarine.

    If their deployment is successful, Chinese nuclear capability will expand from land-based nukes to second nuclear counterstrike, according to this publication.

    People's Daily, Chinese official communist party paper, featured an article on its Internet site about the submarines on July 6th, which is a de-facto confirmation of their deployment.

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    Default Re: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

    More added information



    China tests ballistic missile submarine


    By Bill Gertz
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    China's military has launched the first of a new class of ballistic missile submarines in what defense officials view as a major step forward in Beijing's strategic weapons program.
    The new 094-class submarine was launched in late July and when fully operational in the next year or two will be the first submarine to carry the underwater-launched version of China's new DF-31 missile, according to defense officials.
    "When fully operational, it will represent a more modern, more capable missile platform," said one official familiar with reports of the new submarine.

    A second intelligence official said building submarines is a top priority of the Chinese, and the Type 094 will be "China's first truly intercontinental strategic nuclear delivery system."
    The new Type 094 was spotted by U.S. intelligence agencies at the Huludao shipyard, located on the coast of Bohai Bay, some 250 miles northwest of Beijing.
    The submarine is in the early stages of being outfitted and is not yet equipped with new JL-2 submarine-launched nuclear missiles.
    The submarine is believed to be based largely on Russian nuclear submarine technology, the officials said.
    A CIA report made public last week stated that Russia was a major supplier of technology to China's naval nuclear propulsion programs.
    The launching of the new missile submarine appears ahead of schedule. A Pentagon report on Chinese military power made public in May stated that the new Chinese missile submarine would not be deployed until around 2010.
    A Defense Intelligence Agency report produced in 1999 and labeled "secret" stated that the new submarine is part of a program by China of "modernizing and expanding its missile force."
    "Mobile, solid-fuel missiles and a new ballistic missile submarine will improve the force's ability to survive a first strike," the report said, "while more launchers, on-board penetration aids, and possibly multiple warheads will improve its ability to penetrate missile defenses."
    The DIA report stated that China is expected to field one new ballistic missile submarine by 2020.
    A Chinese Embassy spokesman had no immediate comment.
    In a related development, U.S. intelligence officials said the Chinese suffered a setback in their JL-2 missile program when a test flight of the JL-2 missile failed over the summer.
    The JL-2 missile program was delayed by the test failure but is continuing to be developed, the officials said. China conducted tests of the JL-2 in 2002 and last year.
    Richard Fisher, vice president of the Washington-based International Assessment and Strategy Center, said the launch of the new missile submarine is "an astounding development."
    "The 094 has followed 093 development far more rapidly than the assessments in the annual Pentagon reports on the PLA," Mr. Fisher said, referring to the China's People's Liberation Army.
    China also recently launched a new attack submarine known as the Type 093. Additionally, U.S. intelligence agencies were surprised by China's disclosure in July of a third new type of submarine known as the Yuan-class, a diesel-electric attack submarine.
    "In the very near future, China will have a secure, second-strike nuclear attack capability that it will use to bolster its nuclear strategy of seeking to deter the United States from aiding Taiwan after a PLA attack," Mr. Fisher said.
    Mr. Fisher said the JL-2 likely will have multiple warheads.
    The new submarine will make it more difficult for the U.S. military to take part in a defense of Taiwan because of the threat of nuclear retaliation, he said.
    The Pentagon has deployed a new missile defense system, but a spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency has said the current interceptor system is designed to stop a long-range North Korean missile, but not an attack from Chinese or Russian missiles.
    A 1999 report by the House Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China stated that the new missile submarine will likely benefit from stolen U.S. nuclear warhead designs.
    The report stated that the JL-2 is expected to have a longer range than the DF-31 and that 16 JL-2s will be deployed on the new submarine.
    The range of the JL-2 is estimated to be about 7,500 miles, enough "to strike targets throughout the United States," the report said.
    "Instead of venturing into the open ocean to attack the United States, the Type 094-class submarines could remain near [Chinese] waters, protected by the [People's Liberation Army,] Navy and Air Force," the report said.
    The new submarine will be a major improvement over China's current ballistic missile submarine known as the Xia, which is equipped with medium-range missiles.
    The current Xia submarine is considered so noisy to underwater detection gear that its chances of surviving attack submarine strikes in ocean waters are limited.

    http://washingtontimes.com/national/...5302-2338r.htm

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    Default Re: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

    Hi all, I read the articles you posted and started looking around in google earth and found some cool sights. First off I found the shipyards mentioned in the article they are at 40°43'3.96"N 120°59'32.49"E . And if my tinfoil hat is not acting up I think I see something being built on the shipyard right next to the one with the huge tanker. Also I found what seems like a sub in the water off the coast of Lushun. This one is at 38°43'15.16"N 121°15'24.04"E. That whole section of sea is teeming with traffic. And last but not least found some other subs(?) at port on 38°47'28.55"N 121°14'31.76"E. Here they seem to be anchored to each other. Is this common? or does this mean they're probably not subs? Anyways, just wanted to contribute to the topic with something interesting.

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    Default Re: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

    Some interesting shots there Monterey…

    The first one looks like it could indeed be that sub under construction. It's hard to tell without enhancing the photo.

    That second, I don't believe it is a sub. It is just too pointed to be a submarine. Those tend to be rounded and somewhat blunt. And, it couldn't be the sail of a submarine because that object is about 200 feet long. Not sure what it is though but, it seems to be moving pretty quickly…

    With the third, those could possibly be submarines. I have seen other pictures of subs moored together like that before. Also note the three other ships to the left with the battleship grey paintjobs.

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    Default Re: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike

    Actually, after Sean posted some info on the new Chinese Yuan-class submarine, I'm going to revise my opinion on the second picture.

    I'd say that the above linked picture looks like the "spine" of a partially submerged Yuan sub moving through the water. Note how the "spine" on the Yuan runs nearly the entire length of the sub.


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    Default Re: China Deploys Nuclear Submarines Capable of Nuclear Counterstrike






    Report: China has deployed missiles giving it second-strike capability against U.S.

    A DF-31 missile. (fas.org)
    The U.S. intelligence community has determined that Beijing has developed and deployed a series of missiles that would give China second-strike nuclear capability in any confrontation with the United States. The determination of a sea-based deterrent is said to have significantly increased Beijing's threat to the United States.

    "It is clear to me that China is now embarking on a significant investment in a second-strike capability to ensure the survival and, thus, viability of its nuclear forces," said Richard Fisher, a researcher at the International Assessment and Strategy Center and a leading U.S. expert on China.

    In a presentation to the American Enterprise Institute on July 11, Mr. Fisher said China has launched or tested a series of nuclear missiles and platforms.

    He said the first Type 94 submarine ballistic nuclear missile has been equipped and launched.

    The Type 94, which began construction in 1999, is designed to contain the JL-2 submarine-launched nuclear missiles. Each submarine is meant to contain 16 JL-2s, or DF-31s, with a range of 8,000 kilometers, which would allow Chinese submarines to target portions of the United States from areas near the Chinese coast.

    The disclosure of the completion of the Type 94 submarine appeared to mark a significant acceleration in China's nuclear submarine program. As late as May 2004, the Pentagon asserted that the new Chinese missile submarine would not be operational until around 2010.

    "The JL-2 SLBM has undergone a series of tests," Mr. Fisher said. "The potential for this to be armed with multiple warheads is there."

    U.S. intelligence sources agree with Mr. Fisher's assessment. They said Beijing has made the production of nuclear warheads and launchers a priority, with emphasis on mobility and decoys.

    The Pentagon has determined that China plans to deploy the DF-31A, an extended-range variant of the mobile long-range DF-31, in 2007. The sources said the new three-stage, solid-fuel, mobile missile, with a range of 12,000 kilometers, could carry up to three payloads that would separate and overcome existing U.S. missile defenses.

    "For China, nuclear weapons largely have four purposes: one, strategic deterrence; two, retaliation; three, counter-coercion; and four, great-power status," Rand Corp. senior analyst Evan Medeiros said.

    Another Chinese missile, the DF-5 Mod 2, with a range of 13,000 kilometers, is said to have completed deployment in 2005. The sources said China has developed the two-stage, liquid-fuel missile to carry between five and 10 warheads.

    Beijing has also sought to overcome the vulnerability of its fleet by building a huge naval base on Hainan Island in the South China Sea. The sources said the base would contain an underground facility to shelter platforms, such as nuclear submarines, against any potential U.S. attack.

    Intelligence sources said Beijing has been developing an anti-ship ballistic missile. They said the weapon could be a sea-based version of the DF-11 Mod 1 land-based missile.

    "One could easily imagine that there is a plan to drop, in a surprise manner, 10 to 12 warheads on either side of the continental United States in conjunction with a build-up to rescue Taiwan from whatever kind of attack China seems to be contemplating," Mr. Fisher said. "I can easily imagine, I do not know, President Hillary Clinton sitting in the White House wondering, 'Gee, we could not do anything to stop those 12 warheads that did not explode but landed off of all our major cities on both coasts.' And do we really want to be sending our single carrier that might be deployed with the Seventh Fleet into this maelstrom? That is the kind of coercion potential
    that is out there."


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