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Thread: American Patriotic Songs

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    Default American Patriotic Songs

    Please post song lyrics here in this thread for other American Songs.

    I'll mention that I once owned a book called "Our American Heritage", which contained more songs, poetry and stories than I can ever remember in my entire life. I read the book many times, learning songs as a child. No one prompted me to do so, I just enjoyed learning about America.

    I have since lost that book, and never have seen it again. I wish to use this area of the forums (America and American History) to... sort of reproduce that very book, but in our own form.

    Any help is appreciated.

    Rick
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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    America the Beautiful
    Words by Katharine Lee Bates,
    Melody by Samuel Ward



    O beautiful for spacious skies,
    For amber waves of grain,
    For purple mountain majesties
    Above the fruited plain!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    And crown thy good with brotherhood
    From sea to shining sea!

    O beautiful for pilgrim feet
    Whose stern impassioned stress
    A thoroughfare of freedom beat
    Across the wilderness!
    America! America!
    God mend thine every flaw,
    Confirm thy soul in self-control,
    Thy liberty in law!

    O beautiful for heroes proved
    In liberating strife.
    Who more than self their country loved
    And mercy more than life!
    America! America!
    May God thy gold refine
    Till all success be nobleness
    And every gain divine!

    O beautiful for patriot dream
    That sees beyond the years
    Thine alabaster cities gleam
    Undimmed by human tears!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    And crown thy good with brotherhood
    From sea to shining sea!

    O beautiful for halcyon skies,
    For amber waves of grain,
    For purple mountain majesties
    Above the enameled plain!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    Till souls wax fair as earth and air
    And music-hearted sea!

    O beautiful for pilgrims feet,
    Whose stem impassioned stress
    A thoroughfare for freedom beat
    Across the wilderness!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    Till paths be wrought through
    wilds of thought
    By pilgrim foot and knee!

    O beautiful for glory-tale
    Of liberating strife
    When once and twice,
    for man's avail
    Men lavished precious life!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    Till selfish gain no longer stain
    The banner of the free!

    O beautiful for patriot dream
    That sees beyond the years
    Thine alabaster cities gleam
    Undimmed by human tears!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    Till nobler men keep once again
    Thy whiter jubilee!



    This song, written by Kathrine Lee Bates first in 1893, 1904 and lastly re-written by her in 1913.



    Here is a note from Katharine Lee Bates:
    "One day some of the other teachers and I decided to go on a trip to 14,000-foot Pikes Peak. We hired a prairie wagon. Near the top we had to leave the wagon and go the rest of the way on mules. I was very tired. But when I saw the view, I felt great joy. All the wonder of America seemed displayed there, with the sea-like expanse."


    I live about 12 miles as the crow flies from the top of Pikes Peak. It's a bit further if I drive there, but I've stood in the same spot as she did while working on that song.


    I have lived now, in Colorado for about 17 years. I moved here in 1989, and one of the choices for a home was with the back yard view to Pikes Peak. It was the one my wife chose, and I loved the view. We've stayed there since then.


    Having stood upon that mountain top, many times now, I can saw without a doubt that Kathrine Bates was certainly inspired by the beauty of the surrounding lands, the plains of Colorado to the East, and the Rocky Mountains to the north, south and west.


    I too, have been inspired when standing on that mountain (mostly to find an oxygen tank!) by the beauty of America. We in America are truly, truly blessed to live in such a diverse country, with lands, rivers, lakes that inspire people even today to write music and songs about the Land in which we live.


    Thank you to Kathrine Lee Bates for the song.

    Rick Donaldson





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    Junior Member Ace's Avatar
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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Trey Parker Lyrics - America, Fuck Yeah Lyrics



    Artist: Trey Parker Lyrics
    Song: America, Fuck Yeah Lyrics



    America...
    America...
    America, FUCK YEAH!
    Coming again, to save the mother fucking day yeah,
    America, FUCK YEAH!
    Freedom is the only way yeah,
    Terrorist your game is through cause now you have to answer too,
    America, FUCK YEAH!


    --from Team America: World Police

    What?/shrug

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Currently, my favorite patriotic song.

    Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue
    By Toby Keith

    American girls and American guys, will always stand up and salute.
    We'll always recognize, when we see ol' glory flying,
    There's a lot of men dead,
    So we can sleep in peace at night when we lay down our heads.

    My daddy served in the army where he lost his right eye,
    But he flew a flag out in our yard 'til the day that he died.
    He wanted my mother, my brother, my sister and me.
    To grow up and live happy in the land of the free.

    Now this nation that I love is fallin' under attack.
    A mighty sucker-punch came flying in from somewhere in the back.
    Soon as we could see clearly through our big black eye,
    Man, we lit up your world like the fourth of July.

    Hey, Uncle Sam put your name at the top of his list,
    And the Statue of Liberty started shaking her fist.
    And the eagle will fly and it's gonna be hell,
    When you hear Mother Freedom start ringing her bell.
    And it'll feel like the whole wide world is raining down on you.
    Ah, brought to you, courtesy of the red, white and blue.

    Instrumental break.

    Oh, justice will be served and the battle will rage:
    This big dog will fight when you rattle his cage.
    An' you'll be sorry that you messed with the U.S. of A.
    'Cos we'll put a boot in your ass, it's the American way.

    Hey, Uncle Sam put your name at the top of his list,
    And the Statue of Liberty started shaking her fist.
    And the eagle will fly and it's gonna be hell,
    When you hear Mother Freedom start ringing her bell.
    And it'll feel like the whole wide world is raining down on you.
    Ah, brought to you, courtesy of the red, white and blue.

    Oh, oh.
    Of the red, white and blue.
    Oh, hey, oh.
    Of my Red, White and Blue.

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Ace, I was thinking...

    something more.. umm.. traditional?

    LOL
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Battle Hymn of the Republic:
    Julia Ward Howe, William Steffe

    Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord;
    He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
    He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword;

    His truth is marching on
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    His truth is marching on.

    I have seen Him in the watchfires of a hundred circling camps;
    They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps;
    I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps,

    His truth is marching on
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    His truth is marching on.


    He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never sound retreat;
    He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgement seat;
    O be swift, my soul, to answer Him! be jubilant, my feet!

    His truth is marching on
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallelujah,
    His truth is marching on.


    In the beauty of the lillies Christ was born across the sea,
    With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me;
    As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free;

    His truth is marching on.
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, Glory, glory Hallujah
    Glory, glory Hallelujah, His truth is marching on.




    The Battle Hymn of the Republic is one that our forefathers sang when fighting for our freedoms and, correct me if I am wrong, but is still the battle song for our military.

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    Senior Member samizdat's Avatar
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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Isaiah, did you type that song? (be jubilant. lillies)??
    Good work. That and Am the beautiful are my two favorites. Hallujah

    canto XXV Dante

    from purgatory, the lustful... "open your breast to the truth which follows and know that as soon as the articulations in the brain are perfected in the embryo, the first Mover turns to it, happy...."
    Shema Israel

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    yes Sami, I typed it in the way it shows in a hymnal. oops =lilies=, it was darker in here last night, lol

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Artist/Band: Williams Hank Jr
    Lyrics for Song: Country Boy Can Survive
    Lyrics for Album: Greatest Hits

    The preacher man says it’s the end of time
    And the Mississippi River she’s a goin’ dry
    The interest is up and the Stock Markets down
    And you only get mugged
    If you go down town

    I live back in the woods, you see
    A woman and the kids, and the dogs and me
    I got a shotgun rifle and a 4-wheel drive
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    I can plow a field all day long
    I can catch catfish from dusk till dawn
    We make our own whiskey and our own smoke too
    Ain’t too many things these ole boys can’t do
    We grow good ole tomatoes and homemade wine
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    Because you can’t starve us out
    And you cant makes us run
    Cause one-of- ‘em old boys raisin ole shotgun
    And we say grace and we say Ma’am
    And if you ain’t into that we don’t give a damn

    We came from the West Virginia coalmines
    And the Rocky Mountains and the and the western skies
    And we can skin a buck; we can run a crop line
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    I had a good friend in New York City
    He never called me by my name, just hillbilly
    My grandpa taught me how to live off the land
    And his taught him to be a businessman
    He used to send me pictures of the Broadway nights
    And I’d send him some homemade wine

    But he was killed by a man with a switchblade knife
    For 43 dollars my friend lost his life
    Id love to spit some beechnut in that dudes eyes
    And shoot him with my old 45
    Cause a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    Cause you can’t starve us out and you can’t make us run
    Cause one-of- ‘em old boys raisin ole shotgun
    And we say grace and we say Ma’am
    And if you ain’t into that we don’t give a damn

    We’re from North California and south Alabam
    And little towns all around this land
    And we can skin a buck; we can run a crop line
    And a country boy can survive
    Country folks can survive

    Still can't listen to this one w/o gettin' misty, it's a Byrneville thing, I reckon. I will, however, pass on the Beechnut.
    Last edited by MTStringer; September 14th, 2006 at 15:52. Reason: comic relief?

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    BTW, Rick, I recall the book inspiring this thread from my earlier years, musta been a thing then, we being about the same age. I'll check around for a copy, since you jogged my memory. I understand the Hank Jr. song wasn't exactly what you had in mind, but after Aces contribution I didn't see much harm in it.

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    Senior Member samizdat's Avatar
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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    O give me a home, where the buffalo roam,
    and the deer and the antelope play.
    Where seldom is heard, a discouraging word,
    And the skies are not cloudy all day.

    canto XXV Dante

    from purgatory, the lustful... "open your breast to the truth which follows and know that as soon as the articulations in the brain are perfected in the embryo, the first Mover turns to it, happy...."
    Shema Israel

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    THE BALLAD OF CASEY JONES

    This version was considered by Janie Jones, Casey's wife, to be the most accurate representation of Wallace's original version. Mrs. Jones spent much of her life refuting some of the vulgar references other versions made about her husband.
    Come all you rounders if you want to hear
    A story 'bout a brave engineer,
    Casey Jones was the rounder's name
    "Twas on the Illinois Central that he won his fame.
    Casey Jones, he loved a locomotive.
    Casey Jones, a mighty man was he.
    Casey Jones run his final locomotive
    With the Cannonball Special on the old I.C.
    Casey pulled into memphis on Number Four,
    The engine foreman met him at the roundhouse door;
    Said, "Joe Lewis won't be able to make his run
    So you'll have to double out on Number One."
    If I can have Sim Webb, my fireman, my engine 382,
    Although I'm tired and weary, I'll take her through.
    Put on my whistle that come in today
    Cause I mean to keep her wailing as we ride and pray.
    Casey Jones, mounted the cabin,
    Casey Jones, with the orders in his hand.
    Casey Jones, he mounted the cabin,
    Started on his farewell Journey to the promised land.
    They pulled out of Memphis nearly two hours late,
    Soon they were speeding at a terrible rate.
    And the people knew by the whistle's moan.
    That the man at the throttle was Casey Jones.
    Need more coal there, fireman Sim,
    Open that door and heave it in.
    Give that shovel all you got
    And we'll reach Canton on the dot
    On April 30, 1900, that rainy morn,
    Down in Mississippi near the town of Vaughan,
    Sped the Cannonball Special only two minutes late
    Traveling 70 miles an hour when they saw a freight.
    The caboose number 83 was on the main line,
    Casey's last words were "Jump, Sim, while you have the time.
    "At 3:52 that morning came the fareful end,
    Casey took his farewell trip to the promised land.
    Casey Jones, he died at the throttle,
    With the whistle in his hand.
    Casey Jones, he died at the throttlle,
    But we'll all see Casey in the promised land.
    His wife and three children were left to mourn
    The tragic death of Casey on that April morn.
    May God through His goodness keep them by His grace
    Till they all meet together in that heavenly place.
    Casey's body lies buried in Jackson, Tennessee
    Close beside the tracks of the old I.C.
    May his spirit live forever throughout the land
    As the greatest of all heroes of a railroad man. Casey Jones, he died at the throttle,
    Casey Jones, with the whistle in his hand.
    Casey Jones, he died at the throttle,
    But we'll all see Casey in the promised land.

    The Wabash Cannonball








    From the great Atlantic Ocean
    To the wide Pacific shore,
    From sunny California
    To ice-bound Labrador,
    She's mighty tall and handsome,
    She's known quite well by all,
    She's the 'boes' accomodation
    On the Wabash Cannonball
    Chorus:
    From the great Atlantic ocean
    To the wide Pacific shore
    From the green ol' Smoky mountains
    To the south lands by the shore
    She's mighty tall and handsome
    And she's known quite well by all
    She's the regular combination
    On the Wabash Cannonball Chorus:
    Listen to the jingle,
    The rumble and the roar,
    As she glides along the woodlands,
    Through hills and by the shore
    Hear the mighty rush of the engine,
    Hear those lonesome hoboes squawl,
    While traveling through the jungle
    On the Wabash Cannonball


    This train, she runs to Memphis,
    Mattoon, and Mexico,
    She rolls through East St. Louis
    And she never does it slow,
    As she flies through Colorado,
    She gives an awful squawl,
    They tell her by her whistle
    The Wabash Cannonball
    Chorus:
    Our eastern states are dandy,
    So the people always say,
    From New York to St. Louis
    And Chicago by the way,
    From the hills of Minnesota
    Where the rippling waters fall,
    No changes can be taken
    On the Wabash Cannonball
    Chorus: Now here's to Boston Blackey,
    May his name forever stand,
    And always be remembered
    By the 'boes throughout the land,
    His earthly days are over
    And the curtains 'round him fall,
    We'll carry him home to victory
    On the Wabash Cannonball
    Chorus:



    "The youngest of the Bunyan boys, (Paul's family), Cal S. Bunyan, built the most wondrous railroad in the world: The Ireland, Jerusalem, Australian & Southern Michigan Line. It took the largest steel mill in the country two years operating on a schedule of 36-hour days and a nine-day week to produce one rail for Cal. Each tie was made from an entire redwood tree. The train had 700 cars. It was so long that the conductor rode on a twin-cylinder, super deluxe motorcycle to check tickets. The train went so fast that, after it was brought to a dead stop it was still making 65 miles an hour. After two months of service, the schedule was speeded up, so that the train arrived at its destination an hour before it left its starting point.
    "One day Cal said to the engineer, "Give 'er all she's got!" That was the end of the I.J.A.&S.M. Railroad. The train traveled so fast that the friction melted the steel rails and burned the ties to ashes. When it reached the top of the grade, the engine took off just like an airplane and carried itself and the 700 cars so far into the stratosphere that the law of gravity quit working. That was years and years ago, but the I.J.A.&S.M. is still rushing through space, probably making overnight jumps between the stars. "Old time hoboes had a name for this Flying Dutchman of a train. They called her 'The Wabash Cannonball', and they said there was no station in America that had not heard her lonesome whistle."



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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    My Wild Irish Rose

    Information
    Lyrics
    The lyrics and music to My Wild Irish Rose were written by Chauncey Olcott for his production of A Romance of Athlone. The music was published in 1899. Chauncey Olcott was born Chanellor John Olcott in Buffalo, New York. He produced several shows about Ireland for the New York stage and was one of the most popular singers, actors and songwriters of his time. His other hits included When Irish Eyes are Smiling.*
    If you'll listen, I'll sing you a sweet little song,
    Of a flower that's now drooped and dead,
    Yet dearer to me, yes, than all of its mates,
    Tho' each holds aloft its proud head.
    'Twas given to me by a girl that I know,
    Since we've met, faith, I've known no repose,
    She is dearer by far than the world's brightest star,
    And I call her my wild Irish Rose.
    My wild Irish Rose,
    The sweetest flow'r that grows,
    You may search ev'rywhere,
    But none can compare
    With my wild Irish Rose.
    My wild Irish Rose,
    The dearest flow'r that grows,
    And some day for my sake,
    She may let me take
    The bloom from my wild Irish Rose.


    They may sing of their roses which, by other names,
    Would smell just as sweetly, they say,
    But I know that my Rose would never consent
    To have that sweet name taken away.
    Her glances are shy when e'er I pass by
    The bower, where my true love grows;
    And my one wish has been that some day I may win
    The heart of my wild Irish Rose.
    My wild Irish Rose,
    The sweetest flow'r that grows,
    You may search ev'rywhere,
    But none can compare
    With my wild Irish Rose.
    My wild Irish Rose,
    The dearest flow'r that grows,
    And some day for my sake,
    She may let me take
    The bloom from my wild Irish Rose.


    From *Popular Irish Songs

    When Johnny Comes Marching Home

    Information
    Lyrics
    This is generally credited to the Union Army bandmaster, Patrick S. Gilmore, who wrote it in 1863. It is similar to the Irish song Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye (a tale of a maimed soldier returning from war). Which version came first is debated. When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    We'll give him a hearty welcome then
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The men will cheer and the boys will shout
    The ladies they will all turn out
    And we'll all feel gay,
    When Johnny comes marching home.

    The old church bell will peal with joy
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    To welcome home our darling boy
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The village lads and lassies say
    With roses they will strew the way,
    And we'll all feel gay
    When Johnny comes marching home.

    Get ready for the Jubilee,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    We'll give the hero three times three,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The laurel wreath is ready now
    To place upon his loyal brow
    And we'll all feel gay
    When Johnny comes marching home.
    History and words from
    Best Loved Songs of the American People
    Clementine

    Information
    Lyrics
    The words and music to the tune are usually attributed to Percy Montross circa 1880. According to a post to the UK Ballad Newsgroup, Montross based his composition on Down by the River Liv'd a Maiden by H. S. Thompson (1863). A copy of the H.S. Thompson tune can be found at the Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music. The tune has since become a popular song with countless different verses (for children, Scouts, etc), as well as some bawdy versions.
    In a cavern, in a canyon,
    Excavating for a mine
    Dwelt a miner forty niner,
    And his daughter Clementine

    Chorus
    Oh my darling, oh my darling,
    Oh my darling, Clementine!
    Thou art lost and gone forever
    Dreadful sorry, Clementine

    Light she was and like a fairy,
    And her shoes were number nine,
    Herring boxes, without topses,
    Sandals were for Clementine.

    Chorus

    Drove she ducklings to the water
    Ev'ry morning just at nine,
    Hit her foot against a splinter,
    Fell into the foaming brine.

    Chorus

    Ruby lips above the water,
    Blowing bubbles, soft and fine,
    But, alas, I was no swimmer,
    So I lost my Clementine.

    Chorus

    How I missed her! How I missed her,
    How I missed my Clementine,
    But I kissed her little sister,
    I forgot my Clementine.

    Chorus
    I've Been Working on the Railroad
    Bill Basham
    Information
    Lyrics
    The origins of the tune are unknown. Some trace it back to a "Louisiana Levee" song of African-Americans. Others believe it is an old hymn adapted by the Irish work gangs in the West. The verses of "Dinah" and "Someone's In the Kitchen" are later additions. The tune was also adapted by Texans as The Eyes of Texas are Upon You. Dinah may refer to a woman OR a locomotive. The horn signifies the call to lunch. I've been working on the railroad
    All the livelong day
    I've been working on the railroad
    Just to pass the time away

    Can't you hear the whistle blowing
    Rise up so early in the morn
    Can't you hear the captain shouting
    Dinah, blow your horn

    Dinah, won't you blow
    Dinah, won't you blow
    Dinah, won't you blow your horn
    Dinah, won't you blow
    Dinah, won't you blow
    Dinah, won't you blow your horn

    Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
    Someone's in the kitchen I know
    Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
    Strumming on the old banjo, and singing

    Fie, fi, fiddly i o
    Fie, fi, fiddly i o
    Fie, fi, fiddly i o
    Strumming on the old banjo
    Red River Valley

    Information
    Lyrics
    This was originally In the Bright Mohawk Valley, a tune popular in New York. It spread throughout the South and cowboys in the Red River Valley localized it to become the tune we are familiar with. From this valley they say you are going
    We will miss your bright eyes and sweet smile
    For they say you are taking the sunshine
    That has brightened our path for a while

    Come and sit by my side if you love me
    Do not hasten to bid me adieu
    But remember the Red River Valley
    And the cowboy who loved you so true

    Won't you think of the valley you're leaving
    Oh how lonely, how sad it will be?
    Oh think of the fond heart you're breaking
    And the grief you are causing to me

    Come and sit by my side if you love me
    Do not hasten to bid me adieu
    But remember the Red River Valley
    And the cowboy who loved you so true

    As you go to your home by the ocean
    May you never forget those sweet hours
    That we spent in the Red River Valley
    And the love we exchanged mid the flowers

    Come and sit by my side if you love me
    Do not hasten to bid me adieu
    But remember the Red River Valley
    And the cowboy who loved you so true

    Streets of Laredo
    Barry Taylor
    Information
    Lyrics
    This is a variation of an Irish ballad A Handful of Laurel which follows a similar story. It is also known as The Cowboy's Lament. As I walked out in the Streets of Laredo
    As I walked out in Laredo one day,
    I spied a young cowboy, all wrapped in white linen
    wrapped up in white linen and cold as the clay.

    I see by your outfit, that you are a cowboy,
    These words he did say as I slowly walked by.
    Come sit down beside me and hear my sad story,
    For I'm shot in the breast, and I'm dying today.

    Twas once in the saddle I used to go dashing,
    Twas once in the saddle I used to go gay.
    First to the dradonotuse-house, and then to the card-house,
    Got shot in the breast, and I'm dying today.

    Oh, beat the drum slowly and play the fife lowly,
    And play the dead march as you carry me along;
    Take me to the green valley, there lay the sod oer me,
    For I'm a young cowboy and I know I've done wrong.

    Get six jolly cowboys to carry my coffin,
    Get six pretty maidens to bear up my pall.
    Put bunches of roses all over my coffin,
    Roses to deaden the sods as they fall.

    Then swing your rope slowly and rattle yours purs lowly,
    And give a wild whoop as you carry me along;
    And in the grave throw me and roll the sod o'er me.
    For I'm a young cowboy and I know I've done wrong.

    Go bring me a cup, a cup of cold water.
    To cool my parched lips, the cowboy then said.
    Before I returned, his soul had departed,
    And gone to the round up - the cowboy was dead.

    We beat the drum slowly and played the fife lowly,
    And bitterly wept as we bore him along.
    For we all loved our comrade, so brave, young and handsome,
    We all loved our comrade, although he'd done wrong.
    The Yellow Rose of Texas

    Information
    Lyrics
    The tune was first published in 1853 by an author identified only as "J.K." It was a popular Confederate marching song during the Civil War and with the U.S. Cavalry on western outposts and along the cattle trails following the Civil War. In 1955 the tune was a hit record. There's a yellow rose of Texas
    That I am going to see,
    No other fellow knows her,
    No other, only me.
    She cried so when I left her,
    It like to break my heart,
    And if I ever find her
    We never more will part.

    She's the sweetest rose of color
    A fellow ever knew,
    Her eyes are bright as di'monds,
    They sparkle like the dew.
    You may talk about your dearest May
    and sing of Rosa Lee,
    But the Yellow Rose of Texas
    Beats the belles of Tennessee.

    Oh, now I'm going to find her,
    For my heart is full of woe,
    And we'll sing the song together,
    That we sung long ago;
    We'll play the bajo gaily,
    and we'll sing the songs of yore,
    And the Yellow Rose of Texas
    Shal be mine forevermore.
    When Irish Eyes Are Smilin
    Information
    Lyrics
    The lyrics to When Irish Eyes Are Smiling were written by Chauncey Olcott and George Graff, Jr. and set to the music of Enerst Ball for Olcott's production of The Isle O' Dreams. The music was published in 1912.
    Chauncey Olcott was born in Buffalo, New York. He produced several shows about Ireland for the New York stage. His other hits included My Wild Irish Rose. Ernest Ball was also born in America, but was devoted to Ireland. The first midi is of the chorus only. The second is the entire song.
    There's a tear in your eye,
    And I'm wondering why,
    For it never should be there at all.
    With such pow'r in your smile,
    Sure a stone you'd beguile,
    So there's never a teardrop should fall.
    When your sweet lilting laughter's
    Like some fairy song,
    And your eyes twinkle bright as can be;
    You should laugh all the while
    And all other times smile,
    And now, smile a smile for me.

    When Irish eyes are smiling,
    Sure, 'tis like the morn in Spring.
    In the lilt of Irish laughter
    You can hear the angels sing.
    When Irish hearts are happy,
    All the world seems bright and gay.
    And when Irish eyes are smiling,
    Sure, they steal your heart away.


    For your smile is a part
    Of the love in your heart,
    And it makes even sunshine more bright.
    Like the linnet's sweet song,
    Crooning all the day long,
    Comes your laughter and light.
    For the springtime of life
    Is the sweetest of all
    There is ne'er a real care or regret;
    And while springtime is ours
    Throughout all of youth's hours,
    Let us smile each chance we get.

    When Irish eyes are smiling,
    Sure, 'tis like the morn in Spring.
    In the lilt of Irish laughter
    You can hear the angels sing.
    When Irish hearts are happy,
    All the world seems bright and gay.
    And when Irish eyes are smiling,
    Sure, they steal your heart away.

    Anchors Aweigh
    Information

    Lyrics
    For those not familiar with Army-Navy rivalry it may seem hard to believe that the tune is about the Army-Navy FOOTBALL game!
    The tune was written at the Naval Academy in 1906 for the graduating class of 1907 by the Bandmaster - Lt. Zimmerman. A. H. Miles, a midshipman, wrote the first 3 verses. The last verse was written in 1926 by a then-midshipman, R. Lovell. The tune was first played at the Army-Navy game of 1906 (Navy 10,Army 0) There is an excellent FAQ on the tune among the links below.
    Stand Navy down the field
    Sails set to the sky,
    We'll never change our course,
    So Army you steer shy-y-y-y
    Roll up the score Navy
    Anchor's Aweigh,
    Sail Navy down the field
    and sink the Army, sink the Army Grey.

    Get under way, Navy
    Decks cleared for the fray
    We'll hoist true Navy Blue
    So Army down your Grey-y-y-y
    Full speed ahead, Navy
    Army heave to,
    Furl Black and Grey and Gold
    And hoist the Navy, hoist the Navy Blue.

    Blue of the Seven Seas,
    Gold of God's great sun
    Let these our colors be
    Till all of time be Done-n-n-ne
    By Severn shore we learn
    Navy's stern call:
    Faith, courage, service true
    With honor over, Honor over all.

    Version 2

    Stand Navy out to sea,
    Fight our Battle Cry;
    We'll never change our course,
    So vicious foe steer shy-y-y-y.
    Roll out the TNT, Anchors Aweigh.
    Sail on to Victory
    And sink their bones to Davy Jones,
    Hooray!

    Anchors Away, my boys,
    Anchors Aweigh.
    Farewell to foreign shores,
    We sail at break of day-ay-ay-ay.
    Through our last night on shore,
    Drink to the foam,
    Until we meet once more.
    Here's wishing you a happy voyage home.

    Blue of the Mighty Deep;
    Gold of God's Sun
    Let these colors be
    till all of time be done, done, done,
    On seven seas we learn
    Navy's stern call:
    Faith, Courage, Service true,
    with Honor, Over Honor, Over All.

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    My Old Kentucky Home
    Words and Music by: Stephen C. Foster


    The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home
    'Tis summer, the people are gay;
    The corn top's ripe and the meadow's in the bloom,
    While the birds make music all the day;
    The young folks roll on the little cabin floor,
    All merry, all happy, and bright,
    By'n by hard times comes a-knocking at the door,
    Then my old Kentucky home, good night!
    Chorus

    Weep no more, my lady,
    Oh weep no more today!
    We will sing one song for the old Kentucky home,
    For the old Kentucky home far away.

    They hunt no more for the 'possum and the coon,
    On meadow, the hill and the shore,
    They sing no more by the glimmer of the moon,
    On the bench by that old cabin door;
    The day goes by like a shadow o'er the heart,
    With sorrow where all was delight;
    The time has come when the people have to part,
    Then my old Kentucky home, good night!

    Chorus

    The head must bow and the back will have to bend,
    Wherever the people may go;
    A few more days and the trouble all will end
    In the field where sugar-canes may grow;
    A few more days for to tote the weary load,
    No matter, 'twill never be light,
    A few more days till we totter on the road,
    Then my old Kentucky home, good night!

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Battle of New Orleans




    Music and lyrics by Jimmy Driftwood: Jimmy Driftwood was a high school principal and history teacher who loved to sing, play instruments and write songs. Mr. Driftwood wrote many songs, all for the sole purpose of helping his students learn about this battle and other historical events. But this song turned out to be so popular that it won the 1959 Grammy Award for Song Of The Year (awarded in 1960 for musical accomplishments in 1959). Johnny Horton also won the 1959 Grammy Award for Best Country And Western Performance for his recording of this song. "The Battle of New Orleans," is about a battle in the War of 1812, and it became one of the biggest selling hits of 1959. Students might also be interested to know that there is a movie called "The Buccaneer" about the Battle of New Orleans. It is interesting to reflect on the fact that despite the turbulant early relationship between England and the American colonists, our two countries have long since been strongly united. The words were written to correspond with an old fiddle tune called "The 8th of January," which is the date of the famous "Battle of New Orleans".

    Narrative by Jimmy Driftwood:
    “After the Battle of New Orleans, which Andrew Jackson won on January the 8th eighteen and fifteen, the boys played the fiddle again that night, only they changed the name of it from the battle of a place in Ireland to the “Eighth of January”. Years passed and in about nineteen and forty-five an Arkansas school teacher slowed the tune down and put words to it and that song is The Battle Of New Orleans and I will try to sing it for you.” (*Note -- two minor revisions were made for classroom use)
    Well, in eighteen and fourteen we took a little trip
    along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip.
    We took a little bacon and we took a little beans,
    And we caught the bloody British near the town of New Orleans.

    We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

    Well, I see'd Mars Jackson walkin down the street
    talkin' to a pirate by the name of Jean Lafayette [pronounced La-feet]
    He gave Jean a drink that he brung from Tennessee
    and the pirate said he'd help us drive the British in the sea.

    The French said Andrew, you'd better run,
    for Packingham's a comin' with a bullet in his gun.
    Old Hickory said he didn't give a dang,
    he's gonna whip the britches off of Colonel Packingham.

    We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

    Well, we looked down the river and we see'd the British come,
    and there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum.
    They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
    while we stood by our cotton bales and didn't say a thing.

    Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
    if we didn't fire a musket til we looked 'em in the eyes.
    We held our fire til we see'd their faces well,
    then we opened up with squirrel guns and really gave a yell.

    We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
    There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

    Well, we fired our cannon til the barrel melted down,
    so we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round.
    We filled his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind,
    and when they tetched the powder off, the gator lost his mind.

    We'll march back home but we'll never be content
    till we make Old Hickory the people's President.
    And every time we think about the bacon and the beans,
    we'll think about the fun we had way down in New Orleans.

    We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin,
    But there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

    Well, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
    And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
    They ran so fast the hounds couldn't catch 'em
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

    We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin.
    But there wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
    We fired once more and they began to runnin'
    down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.


    Artist/Band: Classic Country
    Lyrics for Song: Paso - Marty Robbins
    Lyrics for Album: Classic Country: 1950-1964


    Out in the West Texas town of El Paso
    I fell in love with a Mexican girl.
    Night-time would find me in Rosa's cantina;
    Music would play and Felina would whirl.

    Blacker than night were the eyes of Felina,
    Wicked and evil while casting a spell.
    My love was deep for this Mexican maiden;
    I was in love but in vain, I could tell.

    One night a wild young cowboy came in,
    Wild as the West Texas wind.
    Dashing and daring,
    A drink he was sharing
    With wicked Felina,
    The girl that I loved.

    So in anger I

    Challenged his right for the love of this maiden.
    Down went his hand for the gun that he wore.
    My challenge was answered in less than a heart-beat;
    The handsome young stranger lay dead on the floor.

    Just for a moment I stood there in silence,
    Shocked by the FOUL EVIL deed I had done.
    Many thoughts raced through my mind as I stood there;
    I had but one chance and that was to run.

    Out through the back door of Rosa's I ran,
    Out where the horses were tied.
    I caught a good one.
    It looked like it could run.
    Up on its back
    And away I did ride,

    Just as fast as I

    Could from the West Texas town of El Paso
    Out to the bad-lands of New Mexico.

    Back in El Paso my life would be worthless.
    Everything's gone in life; nothing is left.
    It's been so long since I've seen the young maiden
    My love is stronger than my fear of death.

    I saddled up and away I did go,
    Riding alone in the dark.
    Maybe tomorrow
    A bullet may find me.
    Tonight nothing's worse than this
    Pain in my heart.

    And at last here I

    Am on the hill overlooking El Paso;
    I can see Rosa's cantina below.
    My love is strong and it pushes me onward.
    Down off the hill to Felina I go.

    Off to my right I see five mounted cowboys;
    Off to my left ride a dozen or more.
    Shouting and shooting I can't let them catch me.
    I have to make it to Rosa's back door.

    Something is dreadfully wrong for I feel
    A deep burning pain in my side.
    Though I am trying
    To stay in the saddle,
    I'm getting weary,
    Unable to ride.

    But my love for

    Felina is strong and I rise where I've fallen,
    Though I am weary I can't stop to rest.
    I see the white puff of smoke from the rifle.
    I feel the bullet go deep in my chest.

    From out of nowhere Felina has found me,
    Kissing my cheek as she kneels by my side.
    Cradled by two loving arms that I'll die for,
    One little kiss and Felina, good-bye.

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Well... my Old Kentucky home.... has gone PC, I see

    That's NOT the original words, and I can sing 'em, but I won't

    LOL
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Quote Originally Posted by MTStringer View Post
    ... but after Aces contribution I didn't see much harm in it.
    This still makes me laugh: "What?/shrug"

    HAHA!

    EDIT TO ADD:

    USAFlagSite

    God Bless America
    Words and music by Irving Berlin


    While the storm clouds gather far across the sea,
    Let us swear allegiance to a land that's free,
    Let us all be grateful for a land so fair,
    As we raise our voices in a solemn prayer.

    God Bless America,
    Land that I love.
    Stand beside her, and guide her
    Thru the night with a light from above.
    From the mountains, to the prairies,
    To the oceans, white with foam
    God bless America, My home sweet home.
    Last edited by Backstop; September 15th, 2006 at 15:36.

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    Default Re: American Patriotic Songs

    Rick, I noticed the edit as well, after searching 3 or 4 links I gave up and posted the new, improved version. I also kinda lost track of your thread title, American PATRIOTIC Songs, focusing instead on memories of the book you mentioned, and I still don't know how El Paso got in there, so if you want to clean house feel free. It WAS kinda cool, reconnecting with some of the songs, Battle of New Orleans has always been one of my favorites.http://www.contemplator.com/americana/ is a decent site, you should check it out. Songs from the 17th century and up, like this.

    The Bold Soldier

    Information
    Lyrics
    This ballad is also known as The Valiant Soldier. Henry Martin Belden in Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Folklore Society (1940), notes it was printed on broadsides in the 19th century in England. He also traces the song to a 17th century broadside named in The Masterpiece of Love Songs (1887). That broadside was about a gamekeeper and a lord's daughter. Burl Ives dates this to Colonial America. He writes, "During the colonial period, the English were fighting on land and sea against Portuguese, French, and Spanish. Professional soldiers going to or coming from the wars were known everywhere in England. Captain Miles Standish and Captain John Smith were typical soldiers of fortune." The song was collected throughout the United States, including the states of Arkansas, Missouri, Michigan, Maine, North Carolina, Vermont, Tennessee, Georgia, Louisiana, Virginia, New Jersey, Illinois. It was also found in Nova Scotia.
    Soldier, oh soldier,
    A-coming from the plain
    He courted a lady for honor and for fame
    Her beauty shone so bright
    That it never could be told
    She always loved the soldier
    Because he was so bold.
    Fa la la la, fa la la la
    Fa la la la, fa la la la

    Soldier, oh soldier,
    It's I would be your bride,
    But I fear of my father
    Some danger might betide.
    Then he pulled out sword and pistol
    And hung them by his side
    Swore he would be married,
    No matter what betide.
    Fa la la la, fa la la la
    Fa la la la, fa la la la

    Then he took her to the parson,
    And, of course, home again
    There they met her father
    And seven armed men.
    Let us fly, said the lady,
    I fear we shall be slain
    Take my hand, said the soldier,
    And never fear again.
    Fa la la la, fa la la la
    Fa la la la, fa la la la

    Then he pulled out sword and pistol,
    And caused them to rattle,
    The lady held the horse
    While the soldier fought in battle.
    Hold your hand, said the old man,
    Do not be so bold.
    You shall have my daughter
    And a thousand pounds of gold.
    Fa la la la, fa la la la
    Fa la la la, fa la la la

    Fight on! said the lady,
    The portion is too small!
    Hold your hand, said the old man,
    And you shall have it all.
    Then he took them right straight home
    And he called them son and dear
    Not because he loved them,
    But only through fear.
    Fa la la la, fa la la la
    Fa la la la, fa la la la



    in his best Jed Clampett, "Don't rightly recall that one."

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