Page 12 of 21 FirstFirst ... 28910111213141516 ... LastLast
Results 221 to 240 of 410

Thread: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

  1. #221
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,980
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Quote Originally Posted by American Patriot View Post
    Dogs are probable cause. Yes.
    This is what I mean...the dog "Alerted"...did it? Really? Or did the handler just tell the other cop "You'll all clear kid, now let's anally rape this babe".
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  2. #222
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    I know what you mean. I'm just saying that if the dog "alerts" it is probable cause, but the handlers can MAKE them "alert".

  3. #223
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,420
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    That's why there needs to be a set standard of x number of false alerts then a dog is retired from service (NOT to PD target practice!). If they have to go through enough dogs, that will put a good size dent in their operating budget since those dogs aren't cheap.

  4. #224
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,980
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    I've got an idea...how about unless the dog can articulate in English that it has definitely found drugs and it's captured on video tape, then it's not probably cause. I don't do drugs, I will never run afoul of an honest drug dog, but I have far less trust that the police won't make the dog alert so they can fist me.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  5. #225
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Agreed. I don't do drugs.

    I have, however, had a dog alert on one of my bags. When I was traveling overseas and all I was carrying was a kind of duffel bag (a gym bag) for a 10 day stay in the islands - which had also at one time carried weapons and ammo. It was kind of funny actually. The dog it the bag, three separate times, they pulled me out of the line and my bags and went through everything very, very carefully - asking about my GPS and snorkeling gear, my mask (prescription lenses).

    Never ONCE did they ask me "what's in the bag". They looked. Never ONCE did they question what I had carried in it before and never once did they ask me anything bad.

    But, that was also in 2010. It's three years later.

    They made a bigger deal about one of my crew members who tried to walk through the security area with his soda he was obviously drinking. But they searched me.

    They were very concerned I might be using my snorkeling equipment for, you know... snorkeling on an island and off a boat. LOL

  6. #226
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,420
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Quote Originally Posted by American Patriot View Post
    They made a bigger deal about one of my crew members who tried to walk through the security area with his soda he was obviously drinking. But they searched me.
    Just an FYI, if it's TSA hassling about the drink, all someone needs to do is declare their drink a "medically necessary liquid" and they can't do shit. All they can do is swab it for explosives residue. See, they aren't allowed to interfere with anything "medically necessary" and their policies don't outline what all is "medically necessary". Hell, you can theoretically pull the same thing with what is obviously a bottle of Jack Daniels and they can't do anything!

    Also, the same excuse should work with having to take off your shoes. After all, orthopedic inserts are a medical device. If you declare your shoes "medically necessary", they can't really make you take them off.

    http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-informat...essary-liquids

    http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-informat...cal-conditions

  7. #227
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    lol
    Of COURSE Jack would be for "medicinal purposes".

  8. #228
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    US

    Former TSA agent: Your worst fears about us were true

    10:39 AM 01/31/2014


    Caroline May
    Political Reporter







    A former Transportation Security Administration agent has stepped forward and is offering up more information about the nation’s airline security agency, sure to send a shiver up passengers’ spines.


    “Dear America, I saw you naked and yes, we were laughing. Confessions of an ex-TSA agent” Jason Edward Harrington, a former TSA agent (stationed at Chicago O’Hare International Airport) turned author, titles his article in Politico Magazine.


    Harrington — who initially wrote about his experiences as an agent on an anonymous blog — walks readers through troubling circumstance after troubling circumstance.


    “Just as the long-suffering American public waiting on those security lines suspected, jokes about the passengers ran rampant among my TSA colleagues: Many of the images we gawked at were of overweight people, their every fold and dimple on full awful display,” Harrington writes of the full-body “nude” scanners that TSA pulled in 2013. “Piercings of every kind were visible. Women who’d had mastectomies were easy to discern—their chests showed up on our screens as dull, pixelated (sic) regions. Hernias appeared as bulging, blistery growths in the crotch area.”


    Not only were these scanners invasive but they were also ineffective — a fact, Harrington writes, TSA knew.


    “We knew the full-body scanners didn’t work before they were even installed. Not long after the Underwear Bomber incident, all TSA officers at O’Hare were informed that training for the Rapiscan Systems full-body scanners would soon begin. The machines cost about $150,000 a pop,” he wrote, recalling one instructor who told a class of TSA officers that the scanners were “shit.”


    And while the full-body scanners have been scrapped, Harrington offers additional details about TSA officers’ day-to-day, including pat downs for rude customers, code lingo for attractive women, and seizures of items.


    “Once, in 2008, I had to confiscate a bottle of alcohol from a group of Marines coming home from Afghanistan,” he writes. “It was celebration champagne intended for one of the men in the group—a young, decorated soldier, He was in a wheelchair, both legs lost to an I.E.D., and it fell to me to tell this kid who would never walk again that his homecoming champagne had to be taken away in the name of national security.”


    According to Harrington, TSA provided agents with a list of largely Middle Eastern countries whose residents deserved extra scrutiny from TSA. He notes that the list was “purely political” as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia was not included on it, despite those countries’ proclivity for harboring terrorists.


    “In private, most TSA officers I talked to told me they felt the agency’s day-to-day operations represented an abuse of public trust and funds,” he wrote.


    Harrington begins to wrap up his piece by recalling that he used to hint on his anonymous blog that a terrorist who wanted to beat the system could do well simply by joining it.


    “That assertion stemmed from personal experience,” he wrote. “A fellow officer once returned to O’Hare from a trip to TSA headquarters and confessed that he had run into some complications: Someone realized that his background check had never been processed in the four years he had been an employee. He could have been anyone, for all TSA knew—a murderer, terrorist, rapist. The agency had to rush to get his background investigated. Who knows how many similar cases there were, and are, at airports around the nation.”


    No longer blogging anonymously and out of the agency, Harrington is currently working on a novel about his experiences.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  9. #229
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,420
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Another good police story...


    Cop Stops To Play Football With Kid



    Video of Sgt. Ariel Soltura stopping to play football with a boy who was all by himself is drawing national attention as a example of true community policing.

    "While a 2 minute game of football might not mean anything, to some it could mean everything!" the Rosenberg (Texas) Police Department posted on Facebook.

    Soltura said he was clearing the scene of a traffic stop in the area when he saw the boy waving to him.

    "I noticed at that time he was actually playing a game in his mind, but it was by himself," Sgt. Soltura told FOX 26 Houston. "Our philosophy in our department is if we see a kid kicking a can down the road, we go and replace it with a ball."


  10. #230
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    About time we had one.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  11. #231
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    TSA Union: Agency Needs Its Own Armed Officers

    LOS ANGELES March 26, 2014 (AP)
    By TAMI ABDOLLAH Associated Press






    The head of a union representing 45,000 Transportation Security Administration officers says a report conducted by the TSA after a Los Angeles airport shooting last fall doesn't go far enough in addressing threats posed by individuals targeting its officers.
    The Transportation Security Administration recommended Wednesday that airports post armed law enforcement officers at security checkpoints and ticket counters during peak hours.
    The agency made 14 recommendations after a nationwide review of airport security prompted by a fatal shooting at LAX last fall. Authorities say a gunman targeted TSA officers.
    J. David Cox Sr., national president of the American Federation of Government Employees says the recommendation further justifies the union's call for creating an armed unit of law enforcement within TSA.
    TSA Administrator John Pistole doesn't believe more guns at checkpoints are the solution.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  12. #232
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,420
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"


    Tough Mudder Competition for Disabled Vet, 21 Orange County (California) Deputies, and 10 San Ramone Officers

    Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Sykes was injured during his fifth tour in Afghanistan. Although Ryan suffered serious, lifelong injury including traumatic brain trauma, he has maintained an extremely positive outlook on life. One of his dreams since returning home has been to complete the “Tough Mudder.” The Tough Mudder is one of the hardest endurance event series in the country, in which participants attempt 10-12 mile long military style obstacle courses that test physical strength and human fears. These include fears such as fire, water, electricity and heights.

    Ryan’s team, “Silent Predator,” was a collaboration of people and included Orange County Sheriff’s Department School Resource Officer Jay Myers. Myers pulled together 21 Orange County Sheriff’s Department personnel, 10 San Ramone Police Department members, along with others that made up the 54 person “Silent Predator” team. It was a collaboration of all of these members to get Ryan through the course.

    Myers described the overall experience as “Absolutely unforgettable. We had a team of 54 people with the single goal of helping Ryan complete his dream. There were 20 obstacles along the 10.2 mile course of near vertical hills. Team Silent Predators got Ryan through all 20 obstacles.”

    How do you get a wheel chair bound Veteran across a 20 foot gap along a 6 inch wide balance beam surrounded by water on both sides? Myers described the process as “Easy...TEAMWORK by a group of dedicated teammates who don't have "Can't do it" in their vocabulary.”

    How do you go up and down a 45 degree hill with a man in a wheelchair? “IMPROVISE and use whatever you can find. In our case, we found a fire hose to use as a tether so we could pull him up the hills and lower him down the hills,” Myers said.

    “The most memorable moment was when we made it through the final obstacle. Once we finished the course, everyone was very emotional. We all knew we were a part of something very special. While on the course, the team was solely focused on getting Ryan through it. The course was extremely difficult and to know we made it all the way was very gratifying. Everyone was emotional.”

    Congratulations to Team Silent Predator!

  13. #233
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Congratulations! Your tiny town has an MRAP and is ready for war





    Here at The Watch, we’re looking for the smallest town in America to acquire an MRAP, or Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected armored personnel vehicle.
    For the past few years, the Pentagon has been giving these vehicles to police departments across the country. The unwieldy behemoths have little real application in domestic police work. They’re designed for use on a battlefield. (The Pentagon offers no training to police departments when it gives the vehicles away. And they’ve been known to tip over.)
    But police departments are snatching them up. It’s part of the general trend toward more militarized domestic police forces that’s been happening since about the early 1980s.
    Below, I’ve assembled a quick (but by no means comprehensive) rundown of towns and counties to have recently required an MRAP from the Defense Department. But we want to find the tiniest town in America whose police force will be protected from any potential insurgent uprising. So far, the leading contender is Dundee, Mich., a sprawling metropolis of 3,900 people. If you hear of a town with fewer people acquiring an MRAP, please let me know.
    Towns and counties that have recently acquired an MRAP:

    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  14. #234
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Illegal use of Government resources....

    Report: Secret Service Were Assigned To Protect Assistant Of Agency’s Director During Dispute With Neighbor

    May 12, 2014 7:00 AM
    Share on email ?
    View Comments
    Members of the Secret Service watch while President Barack Obama attends a Democratic National Committee roundtable at the home of Anne Wojcicki, Chief Executive Officer of genomics company 23andMe, on May 8, 2014 in Los Altos, Calif. (credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)


    Related Tags:

    Colombia, Mark Sullivan, President Barack Obama, Secret Service, White House
    Latest News


    Get Breaking News First

    Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
    Sign Up


    WASHINGTON — Members of a Secret Service special unit responsible for patrolling near the White House were pulled off that assignment over at least two months in 2011 to protect the assistant of the agency’s director while she was engaged in a dispute with a neighbor, according to a report in The Washington Post.
    Agents were told that the Secret Service director at the time, Mark Sullivan, was concerned that his assistant was being harassed by her neighbor, the Post reported in a story posted Saturday night on its website. The newspaper cited three people familiar with the operation but did not provide their names.
    The agents were pulled from a surveillance team that patrols the outskirts of the White House compound and monitors the southern side of the executive mansion whenever crowds gather to watch the president and first family travel via motorcade or helicopter, the Post reported.
    Romney Says He Supports Raising Minimum Wage
    Agents inside the Washington field office were concerned that the diversion of agents increased security risks to the compound and the president, two people familiar with the discussion told the newspaper. A spokesman for the agency told the Post that the agents involved were not part of the president’s protective detail and therefore the operation had no impact on it.
    Sullivan left the Secret Service in 2013 nearly a year after a scandal involving members of the presidential protection team hiring prostitutes ahead of a trip by President Barack Obama to Colombia in 2012. In a statement to the Post, Sullivan said a supervisor in his office authorized the visits to the assistant’s home without his knowledge, that they lasted only a few days and that they were appropriate given the report of threats to an employee.
    Called “Operation Moonlight” within the agency, the assignment that summer of 2011 called for two agents twice a day, in the morning and at night, to monitor the home of his assistant, the Post reported. The residence was in rural area outside the southern Maryland town of La Plata, nearly an hour’s drive from Washington.
    First Lady On Nigerian Kidnap Victims: ‘In These Girls, Barack And I See Our Own Daughters’
    Two agents put on Operation Moonlight thought the reassignment was a potentially illegal use of government resources and were concerned enough about their own liability that they kept records of their involvement and their superiors’ instructions, the Post reported. Some informed the inspector general for the Homeland Security Department about the operation, the newspaper said.
    White House spokesman Jay Carney said the White House was not aware of the allegations involving the president’s protection and referred questions to the Secret Service, according to the Post.
    Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan confirmed that agents were pulled off their White House duty to check on the safety of the director’s assistant. However, he disputed accounts that Operation Moonlight lasted for months, saying agency records indicated that the assignment took place for only a few days over the Fourth of July weekend.
    Donovan said the operation was part of the agency’s standard response to potential threats to an employee.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  15. #235
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,980
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    If I was having a dispute with a neighbor and they called in the Secret Service, I'm not entire sure what i'd do.

    I'm guessing the dispute involved the high ranking government person doing something egregiously wrong or just plain illegal and the neighbor complained.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  16. #236
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    The US Secret Service has two jobs. Protective Details and fraud/check/treasuries investigations.

    They are generally assigned to the President, his family members, the VP, and his family members and protection of certain foreign dignitaries (for instance if the President of PM of some country comes to visit the US).

    The Protective Details are high stress, very sought after jobs.

    Doing checking fraud, and things like credit card fraud aren't as "fun".
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  17. #237
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Speaking of "Secret Service"..... not exactly, but close enough.

    Ex-Treasury Sec. Geithner: White House told me to lie for Sunday news shows

    Posted by gulfdogs on May 12, 2014
    Posted in: crime, DNC, GOV, progressive, propaganda. 2 Comments




    In a memoir released Monday, former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner recounts his view of the financial crisis and how administration officials chose to deal with the public. One telling paragraph, among excerpts published by Politico, shows how seriously President Obama’s political operation takes its responsibility to tell the truth to the American people.


    Not surprisingly, they don’t take it that seriously at all. Here’s how Geithner describes the lying process:


    “I remember during one Roosevelt Room prep session before I appeared on the Sunday shows, I objected when Dan Pfeiffer wanted me to say Social Security didn’t contribute to the deficit. It wasn’t a main driver of our future deficits, but it did contribute. Pfeiffer said the line was a ‘dog whistle’ to the left, a phrase I had never heard before. He had to explain that the phrase was code to the Democratic base, signaling that we intended to protect Social Security.”


    It’s refreshing to hear leftists using “dog whistles” to describe what they’re up to for a change, since it’s a phrase they generally use to accuse Republicans of being secret racists. But it’s disheartening to get such crystal clear evidence of how politically charged White House appearances on Sunday news shows are.


    It’s the line of thinking that directed former U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice to go on five news shows days after the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on the U.S. outpost in Benghazi and lie about the deaths of four Americans.


    Rice’s marching orders were to convince viewers that the havoc that killed an American ambassador and three other men had nothing to do with the Obama administration’s failures.


    Geithner was told his job was to convince viewers the Democrat lodestone of Social Security wasn’t a burden on the nation’s deficit.


    Both positions are premeditated lies, but at least we know how and why Obama officials are prepped to lie to the American public on Sunday mornings.


    And Jay Carney has to get a day off sometime.


    http://www.bizpacreview.com/2014/05/...s-shows-118478
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  18. #238
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Report: State Department Stockpiles Massive Quantities of Explosives: “C4, Liquid Explosives, Blasting Caps, Detonating Cords”

    Mac Slavo
    May 12th, 2014
    SHTFplan.com
    Comments (155)
    Read by 8,283 people
    226


    25


    315



    (Wiki Commons: Inserting blasting caps into composition C4 explosives)
    In recent years it has come to light that the Department of Homeland Security has amassed an arsenal that includes billions of rounds of ammunition, high-powered assault rifles, riot gear and armored vehicles. But according to a new report from WND, they’re not the only ones preparing for a future conflict that may involve law enforcement, military and intelligence assets.
    The U.S. State Department has now joined the mix, having recently placed purchase orders for everything from plastic and liquid explosives to detonating cords and fuse igniters. It’s not clear what the State Department, whose responsibility is to oversee international relations and foreign policy via embassies around the world, intends to do with hundreds of pounds of explosives that are likely to be shipped outside of the United States, but it’s clear that whatever the mission may be, it’s not exactly peaceful.
    State’s specific mode of distributing the explosive materials remains unclear, as its Diplomatic Pouch Policy explicitly prohibits the shipment of explosives through DPM/U.

    State specifically is purchasing – and sending to Sterling, Virginia – 450 pounds of C4 M112 explosives, nearly 2,600 containers of liquid explosives, 188 feet of “linear-shaped charges” and more than 8,000 blasting caps via Solicitation No. FY14-GC-273.
    A separate procurement, Solicitation No. FY14-GC-281, calls for 225 pounds of C4 plastic explosives, five pounds of C2 “sheet explosives” and 144 bottles of high-energy liquid explosives. Thousands of additional feet of detonating cord – plus 18,000 feet of military-grade safety fuses and hundreds of blasting caps and fuse igniters – are likewise part of this order.
    A third procurement, Solicitation No. FY14-GC-282, seeks another combination of C4 block, sheet and liquid explosives with accompanying caps, igniters and related blasting equipment.
    Finally, an array of “explosive entry systems,” “blasting tubes” and inert C4 and dynamite are sought under Solicitation No. FY14-GC-272.
    State separately is buying hundreds of thousands of rounds of live 9mm “ball” ammunition as well as a lesser amount of non-lethal simulated ammo.
    Full reports at WND
    Coupled with recent revelations that individuals with ties to terrorism and extremists movements are being allowed into the United States, one can’t help but wonder what the State Department is up to.
    Would it be out of the question to suggest that some of these explosives are destined to be delivered into the hands of organizations in the middle east and elsewhere that could use them against western-friendly targets? Of course, the State Department, like the ATF during Operation Fast and Furious, will be sure to track the delivery and transfer of such munitions, so concerns that we’re supplying terrorists with weapons and bombs are probably unfounded.
    Maybe it’s just us, but we’re somewhat bewildered at the fact that a law abiding American purchasing a few boxes of ammunition and paying cash can be red flagged as a terrorist, while the actual terrorists (like Mexican drug cartels, et. al.) are being armed by our very own government and purposely kept off of terrorist watchlists that are designed to prevent their entry into America.
    Somethin’ just ain’t right.

    Please Spread The Word And Share This Post
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  19. #239
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Just Us Department at it again.

    HOLDER SAYS VA HOSPITALS NOT ON HIS RADAR

    Posted on May 14, 2014



    Holder: “Well, obviously these reports if they’re true are unacceptable, and the allegations are being taken very seriously by the administration. But I don’t have any announcements at this time with regard to anything that the Justice Department is doing.” He said the VA is on his radar although there are no thoughts about investigating.

    More hospitals have turned up hiding lists and they will continue to the point where Americans can no longer live with veterans be murdered.

    Eventually it will become obvious, the redundancy in this administration, nothing is investigated; Stimulus, Black Panther, GM, Solyndra, Fast and Furious, Gitmo releases, Tea Party 503C, Dream Act, Benghazi, ObamaCare…

    .


    DM: DOJ won’t investigate deaths of veterans placed on VA hospital’s secret waiting list ‘at this time’


    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  20. #240
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Time to stop the nonsense. They gonna gun down some cows or something?


    USDA Orders Submachine Guns with 30 Round Magazines

    May 15, 2014 Mike Woldburg Leave a comment Go to comments

    A May 7th solicitation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture seeks “the commercial acquisition of submachine guns [in] .40 Cal. S&W.”

    According to the solicitation, the Dept. of Agriculture wants the guns to have an “ambidextrous safety, semiautomatic or 2 round [bursts] trigger group, Tritium night sights front and rear, rails for attachment of flashlight (front under fore group) and scope (top rear), stock collapsible or folding,” and a “30 rd. capacity” magazine.


    They also want the submachine guns to have a “sling,” be “lightweight,” and have an “oversized trigger guard for gloved operation.”


    The solicitation directs “all responsible and/or interested sources…[to] submit their company name, point of contact, and telephone.” Companies that submit information in a “timely” fashion “shall be considered by the agency for contact to determine weapon suitability.”


    Follow AWR Hawkins on Twitter @AWRHawkins Reach him directly at awrhawkins@breitbart.com.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •