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Thread: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

  1. #241
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    This Is Why They Should Knock First: Multiple Cops Shot, One Killed in No Knock Raid

    Melissa Melton
    The Daily Sheeple
    May 13th, 2014
    Reader Views: 9,995
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    A lot of people — innocent people — and their pets have wound up dead during no knock raids in recent years in this country.
    A no knock raid is when officers can serve a warrant on a house without notifying the residents first. At all. Period. Without ringing the doorbell, calling first, a knock, nothing. Police typically do it in the middle of the night or in the wee hours of the morning, too, when people are more likely to be asleep. The majority of these raids aren’t even for violent crimes or imminent threats to life and limb, but drug crimes.
    So a lot of people tend to die. It’s a pretty stupid way to enforce laws.
    We live in a country where the citizenry are armed. If it’s the middle of the night and you hear someone busting through your front door, and if you exercise your 2nd Amendment rights by owning a firearm, your first reaction is going to be to draw that firearm to protect yourself and your family.
    If you do that when a burglar or worse is breaking into your house to possibly cause harm to you and your family and property, then you’ve done the wise thing. That’s called self-defense.
    However, if you pull your gun in the same scenario, only replacing the burglar with a SWAT officer, it’s very likely you, and possibly your family and pets, might end up dead. Really dead. Shot 22 times and left to bleed to death dead, like this Marine:
    U.S. Marine Jose Guerena was shot twenty-two times by a SWAT team planning to execute a search warrant. He retrieved a legally possessed rifle in response to sudden intruders, and the SWAT team opened fire on him before establishing any communication. The team later retracted its initial claims he had opened fire when it was established that Guerena had never fired and his safety was still on. The police refused to allow paramedics to access Guerena for more than hour, leaving Guerena to bleed to death, alone, in his own home. Members of the SWAT team subsequently hired legal defense and a large following of fellow Marines held a memorial service at his home with his widow.
    Or you might end up charged with capital crimes because you thought you were defending yourself but you didn’t realize the people breaking into your home were actually police officers.
    Here is just another example of exactly why no knock raids are stupid.
    Killeen, Texas resident Marvin Louis Guy is currently being held at the Killeen City Jail on a $3 million bond for opening fire on a Killeen Tactical Response Unit and a Central Texas Organized Crime Unit that jointly descended on his home at 5:30 in the morning without knocking first to serve a narcotics search warrant last Friday.
    Multiple officers were hit. Detective Charles Dinwiddie later died from his injuries.
    Based on this excerpt from the Killeen Police Department’s press release, the officers weren’t even going in through the front door:
    On Friday May 9, 2014, just after 5:30am, members of the Killeen Police Department Tactical Response Unit and the Bell Organized Crime Unit were attempting to serve a narcotics search warrant. The TRU was beginning to breach the window when the 49 year old male inside, opened fire striking four officers.
    While police may refer to this as a “dynamic entry,” it really just seems like a dumb idea — especially in Texas — or at the very least, a bad idea for a gang of armed men to break in through someone’s window at the crack of dawn and not expect a response in-kind.
    The cop was killed because he was shot in the face. He was shot in the face because he was trying to crawl through these people’s window while they were sleeping like a common criminal would.
    And why is all this deemed necessary over some drugs? No one’s life was in immediate danger here. It begs the question why these officers couldn’t have waited for this man to leave his apartment to go to the grocery store to arrest him, because certainly that would have happened at some point. Now one of those officers had to die over it. Was it worth it?
    Is it ever worth it?
    What happened to cops who protect and serve? These officers aren’t soldiers, but they dress up like them to fight a phony war on drugs which, like the war on terror, will never be won. Prohibition has never historically worked. Besides, if cases can’t be made without paramilitary style no-knock raids conducted on sleeping people in their homes, perhaps the officers don’t have a very good case to begin with.
    We live in a country of increasingly militarized police forces. Over 90% of towns with 50,000 people or more have SWAT teams now. Why exactly are our government agencies doling out billions of dollars in military weapons to our local police departments? The American Civil Liberties Union makes a pretty good point: towns don’t need tanks.
    During the commission of these no knock raids, many innocent people have been gunned down. Children and pets have been shot and killed all across the nation. Elderly people who attempted to protect themselves have been slain in their homes and officers later found out they weren’t even in the right homes to begin with.
    When the officers do it, it’s considered their “duty”; they were just doing their jobs when someone’s eight-year-old accidentally gets killed during a raid. On the other hand, when the average citizen fires under what they thought was the guise of self-defense on people they did not know were officers for breaking into their homes unannounced in the middle of the night, well…those people get charged with capital murder.
    Although, sometimes the Grand Jury fails to indict. Capital murder charges were recently dropped against 28-year-old Henry Goedrich Magee after he shot and killed a cop during a no knock raid on his Central Texas home over some marijuana plants he had been accused of growing. The state ultimately couldn’t prove Magee knew it was police and not intruders who were entering his home before he opened fire nor could they disprove that he was acting in self-defense…because he was.
    Some 40,000 of these no knock raids happen every year in this country. The CATO Institute not only released an interactive map of botched paramilitary raids, but a white paper with an extensive catalog of mistaken raids and abuses that, at 103 pages, is long enough to prove that no knock raids are a horrible pratice that needs to stop.
    This writer knows that she lives in America, so we at least have the superficial appearance of a Constitution and Bill of Rights that includes a Fourth Amendment which is supposed to protect the nation’s citizens from unreasonable search and seizure. Just having probable cause a crime was committed doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have to at least ring the doorbell first.
    The longer these raids continue, the more people are going to needlessly die. What justice are these ill-advised tactics possibly serving?
    It’s just…stupid.
    Delivered by The Daily Sheeple
    - See more at: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/this-....4qzvlhDL.dpuf
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  2. #242
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    No knock raids are almost never necessary.

    I know a couple guys that are friends of friends that are on "dynamic entry" teams and they come up with a million reasons why these are necessary. I dismiss almost every one of the reasons as the made up BS that they are.

    If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

    If you dress up in a black ninja outfit with an armored RV, you need to break down some doors and cap a few dogs to make it feel like "you're doing something".

    I'll also add that if you question them the response is "How many raids have you been on? How many criminals have you taken down" etc. It's not an argument defending the idea, it's an argument from authority that attempts to suppress questions.

    The "They'll flush the evidence" excuse always comes up.

    If there is so little drugs in the house that they can be flushed, YOU DON'T NEED TO DO A NO KNOCK RAID! If they've got several bales of pot or a few dozen kilos of coke...try flushing that.

    I understand though, the most important thing is for the office to go home at night.


    "And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?... The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt!

    -Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    Last edited by Malsua; May 15th, 2014 at 14:23.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    When you are questioning the tactics of "the other side" and they come back with questions like "How many raids have you been on? How many criminals have you taken down" they are merely diverting attention from themselves.

    In EVERY case, EVERY, SINGLE CASE it means they are hiding something. No exceptions.
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Fed-up citizens try to arrest own police chief

    15 Thursday May 2014
    Posted by ashleycherish in Law Enforcement, Militarized Police, Police Brutality, Police State, US News
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    Albuquerque, Citizen's Arrest, excessive force, police brutality, police chief, police state

    For many citizens of Albuquerque, New Mexico, the shooting by police officers of James Boyd, 38, a mentally ill homeless man, was the last straw.
    Unfortunately, Boyd was not the last to be killed by officers who, the U.S. Justice Department charges, “too often use deadly force in an unconstitutional manner in their use of firearms.”
    The community is up in arms, with activists announcing their intent to make a citizen’s arrest on the police chief and city officials blocking protests at council meetings.
    Under fire over 39 police shootings involving 24 fatalities in the city since 2010, the Albuquerque Police Department was accused by Justice of a pattern of excessive force. The report concluded the majority of officer-involved shootings resulting in fatalities from 2009 to 2012 were “unconstitutional.”
    Additionally, officers were accused of frequently using less-than-lethal-force in an unconstitutional manner. Cited was the example of a Taser used on a man who had doused himself in gasoline. The discharged spark from the electronic weapon ignited the fuel, setting the man on fire. Other instances of police escalating situations in which force could have been avoided were charged.
    Police departments are acquiring major battlefield equipment that emboldens officials to strong-arm those they should be protecting. “Police State USA: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming our Reality” (Autographed) chronicles how we got to this point.
    Perhaps most notable was the shooting of Boyd in March.
    Boyd, who was found illegally camping in the Sandia Mountains, was confronted by police. An argument followed in which Boyd was said to have acted erratically. Police shot and killed him as he appeared to be surrendering. The incident was captured on camera.
    For Mayor Richard J. Berry, Boyd’s death was a “game changer,” reported Esquire, and he proposed “sweeping changes” to be implemented by the police chief. Among them was the requirement that officers wear and use lapel cameras during every interaction with the public.
    But that didn’t help Mary Hawkes, 19, foster daughter of a retired judge. She was fatally shot last month after allegedly stealing a car and pointing a gun at an officer. The officer’s account cannot be confirmed because his lapel camera “wasn’t working.” It also proved defective in two previous incidents where possible excessive force was used.
    Public anger spilled over in demonstrations following the Boyd shooting – protesters turned violent, blocking traffic, throwing rocks and bottles and damaging property. Last week, protesters took over the weekly city council meeting, shouting down council members and issuing a “people’s arrest warrant” for the chief of police, charging him with “harboring fugitives from justice at the Albuquerque Police Department” and for “crimes against humanity” in connection with recent police shootings. The police chief quickly left the city council meeting after the citizen’s arrest was announced, and no protesters tried to apprehend him.
    Authorities said, had the protesters attempted to execute their “warrant,” they could have faced charges of battery on a police officer.
    When several protesters conducted a silent protest last Thursday at the rescheduled meeting, they were removed, cited and banned from returning to council chambers for 90 days.
    Learn more at WND
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  5. #245
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Wasn't it an AB police office that saw a man "clench his butt" and had him anally raped several times with digits and an endoscope? No drugs found?

    Clearly they are out of control.

    How do you know if an AB cop is about to go out of control? His lapel cam malfunctions.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Hmmm

    Maybe there should be multiple cops with news media riding along from now on?
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  7. #247
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    More on Albuquerque...

    Rebellion in the USA – Protesters Take Over Albuquerque City Council and Attempt to Arrest Police Chief

    Posted on


    There is something very, very wrong with the Albuquerque, New Mexico police department, and the citizens have just about had enough. Before I get into the heart of this story, I need to provide you with a little background. The Albuquerque Police Department (APD) is well known for its outrageous and inappropriate use of violence. So much so that it has been under investigation by the Department of Justice, which wrote a letter to the Mayor of Albuquerque on April 10, 2014 condemning the police force. Here’s an excerpt from the letter:


    Based on our investigation, we have reasonable cause to believe that APD engages in a pattern or practice of use of excessive force, including deadly force, in violation of the Fourth Amendment and Section 14141. Our investigation included a comprehensive review of APD’s operations and the City’s oversight systems. We have determined that structural and systemic deficiencies—including insufficient oversight, inadequate training, and ineffective policies— contribute to the use of unreasonable force. At the conclusion of this letter, we outline the remedial measures that we believe are necessary to ensure that force is used in accordance with the Constitution. In some instances, these recommendations build on measures and initiatives that are already underway within the department.


    Just prior to the release of the letter, APD officers shot in the back and killed a homeless man named James M. Boyd, who was camping in the Albuquerque foothills. More recently (and after the DOJ’s letter was sent), 50-year-old Air Force veteran Armand Martin was killed outside of his home by a SWAT team in a standoff with police. It seems the APD is incapable of solving any sort of dispute without a citizen ending up dead.


    It makes you wonder what is up with law enforcement in New Mexico in general. If you recall, earlier this year I highlighted a horrific incident in Deming, New Mexico in my post: How a Routine Traffic Stop in New Mexico Turned into a Nightmare of Torture for David Eckert.



    So back to Albuquerque. The people are rightfully very upset, which led to a city council meeting being taken over on May 5th by protesters. This display of civil disobedience even led to an attempt to serve Police Chief Gorden Eden with an citizen’s arrest warrant. As a result of the protest, the city council moved to prevent protests at their latest meeting, which may lead to free speech related lawsuits. You have to watch the following video:


    People have just about had enough, and civil disobedience will only grow greater in the months and years ahead. This is what happens when a nation morphs into a deranged, oligarchic police state. This is also why the Bundy Ranch standoff was such a huge deal, as I noted in one of my most popular posts of 2014: Why the Standoff at the Bundy Ranch is a Very Big Deal.


    In Liberty,
    Michael Krieger
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  8. #248
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Chief Mark Kessler Readys For Waco Like Attack On His Home!

    Friday, May 16, 2014 6:49

    http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative...e-2957340.html




    (Before It's News)

    via The Run Down Live


    Recently dismissed Police Chief of Gilberton, Pennsylvania Mark Kessler, is currently prepping a perimeter inside his home literally as this is being composed. In case you are not familiar with Chief Kessler’s other endeavors? Kessler is the CEO & Founder of B.O.G III%, also CEO & the Founder of Constitutional Security Force. So what could the ex-chief be readying for next? Kessler was recently informed via his contacts within the Law Enforcement community that a Waco, Texas like attack could be pending on his home and family.



    Kessler’s statement about this threat.



    “Federal agencies have been threatening to Waco me AT my home in Pennsylvania, BECAUSE OF MY VIDEOS !!!!! if this act of domestic terrorism occurs I WILL FIGHT TILL MY LAST BREATH ! AND THAT’S A FACT! I WILL NOT SIT IDLE AS I ALONG WITH MY FAMILY IS ASSAULTED BY FEDERAL AGENTS, THAT WILL FIRE UPON MYSELF AND UNARMED CHILDREN WITHOUT HESITATION, IF THIS OCCURS , I ASK ALL MILITIAS FROM ACROSS THE NATION TO TAKE A STAND, I WILL HOLD MY OWN TILL HELP ARRIVES BUT IM ONLY ONE FIGHTING POSSIBLE HUNDREDS” – Mark Kessler


    Kessler followed up on his statement with…

    “Going off line, will be prepping perimeter and inside of home. I’m not expecting anything tonight , I will get more intel from my law enforcement friend” – Mark Kessler



    I think this guy is super paranoid and if the government is indeed going to raid his home its probably because he keeps making threats to people and probably has a ton of guns and ammo in his house. Not that that is illegal in and of itself but between his statements and hi armament would give them probably cause to raid his place. America or not, you can’t threaten politicians while toting a ton of guns and expect to not get a visit from Uncle Sam.
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    http://alternativenewstome1.com/2014...-stream-video/

    Overpasses For America Official Live Stream From Operation Spring!! (Live Stream Video)

    nmorgan75 / 58 mins ago



    (N.Morgan) Here’s the live stream to Operation Spring for today!! Support our Patriots today and give them some prayers! A million self described revolutionary militia are heading to Washington DC with one very pivotal message, Obama regime, Get Out. They’re called the Operation American Spring — and they’re vowing to oust the likes of Mr. Obama, Mr. Boehner, Attorney General Eric Holder, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Sen. Mitch McConnell, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Raw Story reported.

    The stream will start when the protest begins, be patient!!

    SOURCE

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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Feds ignite suspicion with explosive buying spree

    16 Friday May 2014
    Posted by Mary W. in Foreign Policy, State Department, Tyrannical Government
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    Tags
    Arlington Virginia, blasting caps, blasting supplies, blasting tubes, C2, C4, explosives, Foreign Policy, fuse igniters, Metro DC, OBO, safety fuses, Sterling Virginia, US Consulates, US embassies, US Government, US State Department

    Blasting caps, ‘linear-shaped charges’ included in delivery order.
    Two days after WND uncovered a U.S. State Department plan to buy hundreds of pounds of plastic explosives and thousands of containers of liquid explosives, the agency – which refuses to comment on the discovery – awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars in contracts for the blasting supplies.


    The explosives, including hundreds of pounds of C4, originally were to be shipped to Sterling, Virginia, home to the Diplomatic Pouch and Mail Unit, or DPM/U. The unit is tasked with sending secure pouches and crates to U.S. embassies and consulates worldwide, as previously reported.


    The original contracting documents still mention the DPM/U shipping destination and list a State Department contracting office address in Dun Loring, Virginia, site of a diplomatic-security field office.


    But the new contract awards suddenly identify the contracting office address as 1701 N. Ft. Myer Dr., Arlington, Virginia – headquarters of the Office of Security Management within the State Department Construction, Facility and Security Management Directorate.


    The directorate is a division of State’s Bureau of Overseas Building Operations, or OBO, whose mission is to provide “safe, secure, and functional facilities that represent the U.S. government to the host nation and support our staff as they work to achieve U.S. foreign policy objectives.”


    The State Department thus far has awarded contracts in two explosives-procurement actions. Both went to the Arkansas-based Omni Explosives.


    Omni will get $320,000 via Contract Award No. 10524H1636 to provide State with 450 pounds of C4 M112 explosives, nearly 2,600 containers of liquid and aluminum-powder explosives, 188 feet of “linear-shaped charges” and more than 8,000 blasting caps and other equipment. The award satisfies Solicitation No. FY14-GC-273.


    State will pay Omni an additional $30,000 via Contract Award No. 10524H0257 for another 225 pounds of C4 plastic explosives, five pounds of C2 “sheet explosives” and 144 bottles of high-energy liquid explosives.


    Accompanying the order, which satisfies Solicitation No. FY14-GC-281, are thousands of feet of detonating cord plus 18,000 feet of military-grade safety fuses and hundreds of blasting caps and fuse igniters.


    State has not yet awarded contracts in Solicitation No. FY14-GC-282, which seeks yet another combination of C4 block, sheet and liquid explosives with accompanying caps, igniters and related blasting equipment. Nor has it awarded a contract for “explosive entry systems,” “blasting tubes” and inert C4 and dynamite via Solicitation no. FY14-GC-272.


    The State Department in the meantime appears ready, for reasons unknown, to privatize some of its diplomatic pouch-service functions.
    Read more at WND
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  11. #251
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Diplomatic pouches are not allowed to be used to transport explosives.

    That said, they're ignoring laws at every turn, what's another one.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    My thought from the first post on this munitions buy was the use as a means to build INTO a US compound abroad. The point being to blow up sensitive documents and hardware if a field station should fall to aggressor hands. In Benghazi, the compound yielded sensitive documents and CNN even found some things on their stroll through as I recall. Had there been explosives to detonate when it fell, a different story would have played out as far as documents and such. Maybe Benghazi is not the best example considering the implications of fail there, but you may see my point.

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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Normally, embassies and places that have classified materials have a way to shred and destroy the said classified - without having to ship it in dip pouches.

    Typically, the materials are stored on site, and can be used to destroy crypto gear to prevent it from falling into the hands of "commies". Of course, those days are gone, and the commies have access to everything now.

    Does anyone ever wonder why everyone can hear and read our most sensitive information passing across the SIPRnet? Because people at high offices pass information to the bad guys all the damned time now. There's simply no other explanation for it in my opinion.
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    Could it be high ranking officials looking to profit and turning a blind eye to do so? Nah, never happen

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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    The US Department of Agriculture Needs Submachine Guns…And This Is Why

    Posted on May 20, 2014 by Land & Livestock Interntional, Inc.
    “They can’t go to church in these communities without having someone say something. Their kids are harassed in school. Stores and restaurants are not serving them.”
    Ostracism is a valid means for exerting social power (vs. state power which is backed by force and violence) in Anarcho-capitalist societies.

    [Editor’s Note: The following post is by TDV contributor, Wendy McElroy]

    On May 7, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) posted a notice on the government’s Federal Business Opportunities site in order to solicit bids on an undisclosed number of submarine guns. The notice read, in part,


    “The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of Inspector General, located in Washington, DC, pursuant to the authority of FAR Part 13, has a requirement for the commerical [sic] acquisition of submachine guns, .40 Cal. S&W, ambidextrous safety, semi-automatic or 2 shot burts [sic] trigger group, Tritium night sights for front and rear, rails for attachment of flashlight (front under fore grip) and scope (top rear), stock-collapsilbe [sic] or folding, magazine – 30 rd. capacity, sling, light weight, and oversized trigger guard for gloved operation.” [Note: spelling errors in original]


    Speculation On The Why of Submachine Guns

    When President Abraham Lincoln established the USDA in 1862, he called it the “People’s Department.” The USDA website lists its current areas of authority as: Assisting Rural Communities; Conservation; Education and Research; Food and Nutrition; and, Marketing and Trade. The agency has over 100,000 employees. Why do employees of the People’s Department need semi-automatic machine guns to do their job? What would the job description be?


    Second Amendment sites have speculated that the most likely recipients are agents of the US Forest Service (USFS) Law Enforcement & Investigations unit; the USFS falls under USDA control. Although this seems likely, there are also counter-indications. The solicitation notice makes no mention of the USFS, and those agents are already armed. The Wikipedia site on USFS states “Special agents are normally plainclothes officers who carry concealed firearms, and other defensive equipment…” Moreover, the weapon being solicited is typically used for close quarter operations, such as inside a building or into a crowd, rather than in an open or unpopulated area.


    Several people have attempted to reach the two “public servants” listed in the notice as USDA contacts for interested weapon companies. Attempts to contact Linda F.B Josey, head of the Procurement Management Branch, reach an auto-reply that states she is “out for training.” Desiree Clayton, the contracting officer, is “not in the office at this time.”


    The news site Politico managed to get an answer. Politico reported, “USDA spokeswoman Courtney Rowe says the guns are needed by the more than 100 agents employed by the law-enforcement division of the department’s Office of the Inspector General. They’ve carried machine guns for 20 years, she notes. USDA OIG officers ‘are placed in very dangerous law enforcement situations,” another USDA official told POLITICO. ‘They make arrests, they serve subpoenas and they engage in undercover operations’.” What sort of “very dangerous law enforcement situation” does the USDA confront?


    Assuming The USFS Is The Intended Recipient
    The USFS is closely allied with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and often provides it with back-up. A key reason is because the two agencies share responsibility for managing an estimated 167 million acres of public rangeland in America, with the USFS presiding over more than half. The BLM recently laid seige to the ranch of Cliven Bundy. A timeline on the Bundy conflict provides insight into the relationship of the two agencies.


    In March 1993, the BLM designated hundreds of thousands of acres of federal land in Nevada for conservation efforts and closed it off to livestock grazing. Since the 1930s, federal rangelands in Nevada have been managed primarily by the BLM (or its predecessor) and the USFS. Rancher Cliven Bundy called the BLM move a “land grab.” He claimed Nevada owned the land and he refused to remove his cattle.
    In 1995, the USFS was responsible for overseeing 7 million acres in Nevada and became quickly entangled in conflict with ranchers. In April 1995, USA Today reported,


    Thursday evening, a small bomb went off in the U.S. Forest Service office in Carson City, Nev….


    “If it was sent as a message,” says Forest Service spokeswoman Erin O’Connor, “we got it.” Ultimately the issue will be settled by the courts, but ranchers who say they can’t afford to raise livestock without greater access to public land are taking matters into their own hands — setting up what some officials fear is an inevitable and dangerous confrontation. The situation is becoming so tense that federal workers now travel mostly in pairs and are in constant radio contact with district offices.


    “I’m concerned about the safety of my employees,” says Jim Nelson, Forest Service district manager for Nevada. “They can’t go to church in these communities without having someone say something. Their kids are harassed in school. Stores and restaurants are not serving them.”


    A year later, more pipebombs had exploded in the offices of the USFS and the BLM.


    In 2002, another Nevada rancher was found guilty of grazing on federally-claimed land. His sentence affirmed the USFS’s authority over the disputed area.


    Skip forward to April 2014. There were a series of conflicts with the Bundys and their supporters on one side, and armed BLM and other agents on the other. A photojournalist described one incident. “We were on a bridge in southern Nevada in the midst of a tense standoff between the BLM and a group of angry ranchers, milita-members [sic] and gun-rights activists. It seemed as if we were a hair’s breadth away from Americans killing Americans right in front of me.” He reported “the man with a rifle beside me….aimed his weapon in the direction of [BLM] officers,” and said “I’ve got a clear shot at four of them.” Ultimately, no shots were fired.


    Such stand-offs are undoubtedly among the “very dangerous law enforcement situations” that the USFS anticipates. The agency is hardly alone in stockpiling military weapons and ammunition. Bob Owens at the website Bearing Arms observed, “This is part of a trend to arm every branch of federal government, whether the individual agency has a legitimate need for a paramilitary force or not.”







    Conclusion
    No agency seems innocuous or too small to avoid becoming paramilitary. On August 13, 2012, the Business Insider reported, “ the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is looking for 46,000 rounds of ammunition for the National Weather Service.”


    After all, nothing says “public servant” like an armed enforcement agent who points a gun while checking the level of rainfall. That’s especially true if he packs a submachine gun which ordinary Americans cannot obtain without a Federal Firearms License.


    Join the other Dollar Vigilantes discussing this article.
    Wendy McElroy is a regular contributor to the Dollar Vigilante, and a renowned individualist anarchist and individualist feminist. She was a co-founder along with Carl Watner and George H. Smith of The Voluntaryist in 1982, and is the author/editor of twelve books, the latest of which is “The Art of Being Free”. Follow her work at www.wendymcelroy.com.

    http://flyoverpress.wordpress.com/20...d-this-is-why/
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  16. #256
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    http://www.examiner.com/article/anti-veteran-police-state-apologist-inadvertently-gets-one-thing-right

    Anti-veteran police state apologist (inadvertently?) gets one thing right


    Play

    Police Now "Armed For War" Against Returning Veterans Fox 59


    May 21, 2014



    The ongoing, and evidently accelerating, militarization of law enforcement has for a while now been of real concern to those of us who realize that the Posse Comitatus Act is of little value when state, and even local, police departments are allowed to arm themselves as if going to war (war with whom?). That's fine with the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, who caution us to "not pile too much on the militarization of law enforcement," but more than a little alarming to those of us who have vowed not to permit a "government monopoly on force."


    It's a topic that has been coming up with some frequency of late, as more and more police departments obtain heavily armored vehicles from the military, who will no longer be needing them in Afghanistan and Iraq. These huge, lumbering, greenhouse-gas-spewing (and where's the statist outrage over that?) behemoths may not hold much interest for the few remaining cops who think of themselves as "peace officers," but they sure excite the heck out of the inexorably growing number of "Only Ones" who fancy themselves as "operators."


    The law enforcement "need" for vehicles designed for combat operations in some of the most dangerous war zones on Earth (and aren't we supposed to be outraged about "'weapons of war' on our streets"?) has seen numerous dubious justifications, but we occasionally see an especially disturbing one. The sidebar video, showing an interview with Morgan County, Indiana Sheriff's Department Sergeant Dan Downing, is worth watching in its outrageous entirety, but Mike Vanderboegh's Sipsey Street Irregulars provides a transcription of the money quote:
    Sgt. Dan Downing of the Morgan County Sheriff's Department states, "When I first started we really didn't have the violence that we see today," adding, "The weaponry is totally different now that it was in the beginning of my career, plus, you have a lot of people who are coming out of the military that have the ability and knowledge to build IEDs and to defeat law enforcement techniques."
    Whoa--back up a minute. The reason that police have to be armed like an occupying army is that they might have to kill the veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq? Seriously? The Captain's Journal blogger Herschel Smith responds as politely as possible, but at some point, politeness must yield to honesty, and Mr. Smith gets about as close to the balance point as is possible:
    Good grief! First of all, returning veterans aren’t the problem – militarized police are. Second, if returning veterans did decide to take matters into their own hands, if this idiot thinks that a bunch of fat ass, unqualified, keystone cop goofballs like Amerikan police would be able to handle combat veterans, he is living in fantasy world – a world of his own making because he wasn’t man enough to go to the sand box and do it himself.
    Loud mouth coward.
    Yep.


    But Downing is right about one thing. If we the people do find ourselves with no recourse against tyranny short of "voting from the rooftops," we will certainly have the expertise of a great many combat veterans, whether formal members of the Oath Keepers or not, and some of that expertise will be in the form of hands-on experience with Army Technical Manual 31-201, the Improvised Munitions Handbook, although he should know that those techniques are not the exclusive province of military veterans.
    And the government's hired muscle is going to need a bigger MRAP.
    Libertatem Prius!


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  17. #257
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Well..... who knew?

    OMG! FBI Maintains 83-Page Glossary of Shorthand Internet Slang


    Steve Neavling
    ticklethewire.com

    BOGSAT. DILLIGAD. SOMSW.


    Those are three terms – or acronyms – that the FBI considers serious enough to add to its 83-page glossary if Internet slang.


    And the reason for adding the nearly 3,000 terms may be as confusing as the terms themselves, the Washington Post reports.


    The glossary is called “Twittter shorthand,” although it’s not limited to Twitter; it’s designed to familiarize agents with shorthand used on the Internet.


    So what does BOGSAT mean? Bunch of guys sitting around talking.


    DILLIGAD? Does it look like I give a damn?


    And SOMSW? Someone over my shoulder watching.


    “So while I might wanna (want to) LMSO (laugh my socks off) over this glossary, it’s actually kind of serious, when you TOTT (think on these things),” Washington Post writer Caitlin Dewey concludes.



    - See more at: http://www.ticklethewire.com/2014/06....QICpBK0j.dpuf
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  18. #258
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Wonder if they have this one...

    FBHO

  19. #259
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Ruck View Post
    Wonder if they have this one...

    FBHO
    I prefer the long form. Out loud, as I run down the street in my underwear.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  20. #260
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    Default Re: Police, TSA and other "Authorities"

    /chuckles
    Libertatem Prius!


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