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Thread: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Russian General Warns Of World War 3, Russia’s Nuclear Weapons Plans For The World



    A new Cold War is the talk of international politics in 2015, but a former Russian general is warning that the world stands on the brink of a “hot war,” not Cold War 2. In addition, it’s “jokingly” claimed that keeping the “U.S. territory at gunpoint” by threatening World War 3 may be the most effective method of combating the United States.

    In a related report by the Inquisitr, Vladimir Putin recently signed and enacted a new Russian military doctrine which proposes that Russian nuclear weapons defense systems near Europe will be expanded, based upon joint defense projects with China, India, and other countries.

    Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev also warns that the Ukraine crisis may transform into World War 3, claiming that a nuclear war between Russia and the U.S. is possible.

    Former member of Russian Joint Chiefs of Staff Colonel-General Leonid Ivashov spoke to Pravda in a recent interview, and when he was asked about non-nuclear deterrence he responded with a very dark joke.
    “One should keep the U.S. territory at gunpoint to be able to immediately act on the territory. The group should target the Federal Reserve, but I’m joking here, of course. Yet, there is some truth in this joke, because, as a rule, it is financial oligarchs, who need to start wars.”
    Ivashov suggests that the Ministry for Foreign Affairs should start a “combat mission” against the United States to “cause the damage with the use of economics methods.” In particular, he suggests targeting oil supplies and other commodities necessary for waging war. But Ivashov believes that placing Russian nuclear weapons in strategic locations like Latin America would be the best deterrent.
    “Bingo – they have the U.S. territory at gunpoint, and this is what the Americans fear most. They invest a lot of money in missile defense not to wage wars on their own territory. They will be happy to stage wars anywhere, but not on their own territory. We need to find some power to create a group that could, in case of aggression against Russia, act on the territory of the United States. Now that would be a factor of deterrence. They say that the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation and the Russian Ministry of Defense work on that already.”
    Although Ivashov believes a large focus on Russia’s nuclear weapons should be a factor, he also notes that the United States has “not upgraded one single ballistic missile, and they do not build new ones either.”



    This decision has led to the number of Russian nuclear weapons surpassing the number of U.S. nuclear missiles. Under the new U.S. directive that was put into place in 2003, it’s said the U.S. military has focused on positioning high-precision vehicles in strategic locations that use the AEGIS Ballistic Missile System.

    “Thus, the Americans plan to destroy our remaining ballistic missiles in the boost phase of their flight. For these purposes, the Americans create this missile defense. Afterwards, AEGIS systems will disable the warheads of the missiles that have been launched. The Americans do their best to devalue the Russian nuclear missile potential. And they can succeed.”

    If “non-nuclear powers show aggression against Russia, threatening the existence and the territorial integrity of Russia,” then Russia will preemptively use tactical nuclear weapons, according to the former Russian general. Due to the technological balance of power being in favor of the United States and its allies, Ivashov apparently believes this effort will fail since most of Russia’s neighbors are all under the “American nuclear umbrella,” and that World War 3 may be around the corner.


    “It just so happens that it is only Mongolia and Finland that can be the countries against which we can use nuclear weapons, if they threaten us. The situation has changed dramatically, and we are standing on the brink of a war – not a cold, but a hot war. Therefore, today Russia hastily takes efforts to rebuild the defensive capacity of the armed forces and change the military doctrine.”

    As part of this plan for modernizing Russia’s nuclear weapons and military capabilities, Leonid Ivashov claims the space group and long-range aircraft need to be upgraded. He believes that Russia has relied upon the “nuclear shield” as the primary factor of nuclear deterrence, but this shield does not guarantee safety “because we do not see a situation when we can push the button, even for a retaliatory attack.”

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
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    like overripe fruit into our hands."



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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Again, I say... "I'm shocked" that anyone would even consider Russia a problem, let alone a danger to the world...
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Quote Originally Posted by vector7 View Post
    US Now Concerned About Russia's Emerging Nuclear and Strategic Military Capabilities

    by Staff Writers
    Washington DC (Sputnik) Jan 16, 2015



    The United States is concerned about Russia's emerging strategic capabilities in nuclear, space, cyber security spheres, Commander of US Strategic Command Adm. Cecil Haney said on Thursday.

    "Russia has had more than a decade of investments in modernization across their strategic nuclear forces. This is not about the continuation of the cold war <...>This is about emerging capability at a time of significant concerns in Russians execution of their near abroad strategy," Adm. Haney said at the event devoted to strategic deterrence in Atlantic Council, Washington, DC.

    The commander went on by saying that Moscow has significant cyber capability and also "has publicly stated they are developing counter space capabilities."

    "Russian leaders openly maintain that Russia's armed forces have anti-satellite weapons and conduct anti-satellite research," Adm. Haney noted. The commander also reminded of the news of "Russian strategic bombers penetrating the US and ally air defense identification zones on multiple occasions this year."

    Hmm...I've seen this posted somewhere else before.



    Quote Originally Posted by vector7 View Post
    Efforts in the past to lower our defense spending for political purposes to reallocate defense budgets to social programs and cut our nuclear deterrents to appease our enemies has put the nation at a severe strategic disadvantage.

    During America's decline both Russia and China made strides in some technological advancements in its military weaponry. China has reverse engineered much technology it has gleaned from the West.

    Russia has also made advancements in newly acquired weapons technology to counter some of our limited but more advanced weapons systems.

    Russia, China and their allies have been formulating contingency plans to deal with the United States. Plans aiming at long range 'wearing down' of the United States that require close political, geopolitical, financial and military cooperation.

    Although they review the possibility of war, neither power wants to jeopardize an open confrontation until America poses little retaliatory threat. Both agree that the United States is not to be taken intact, but is to be destroyed and broken up after weakened.


    During America's prolonged decline, financially crippled and unable to purchase her foreign policy she becomes isolated from her allies.

    Through a coordinated effort the strongest assets of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air forces are drawn out into an orchestrated and coordinated conflicts and dealt severe blows.

    After greater terror attacks and catastrophic disasters Russia preempts a strike.

    Some major cities are destroyed...













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  4. #284
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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Russia ends US nuclear security alliance

    Accord worked to keep stockpiles secure


    54 Comments Print
    18l oosenukes - In this Wednesday, Dec. 24, 1997 file photo, soldiers prepare to destroy a ballistic SS-19 missile in the yard of the largest former Soviet military rocket base in Vakulenchuk, Ukraine, 220 kilometers (137 miles) west of Kiev. The U.S. helped Ukraine and other ex-Soviet nations secure former Soviet nuclear weapons and dismantle some of them under the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program initiated by Sens. Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar. (Associated Press)

    AP/File

    The United States helped Russia secure and dismantle nuclear weapons in the Cooperative Threat Reduction programs.
    By Bryan BenderGlobe Staff January 19, 2015

    WASHINGTON — The private diplomatic meetings took place over two days in mid-December in a hotel overlooking Moscow’s Red Square.

    But unlike in previous such gatherings, the sense of camaraderie, even brotherhood, was overshadowed by an uncomfortable chill, according to participants.

    In the previously undisclosed discussions, the Russians informed the Americans that they were refusing any more US help protecting their largest stockpiles of weapons-grade uranium and plutonium from being stolen or sold on the black market. The declaration effectively ended one of the most successful areas of cooperation between the former Cold War adversaries.

    “I think it greatly increases the risk of catastrophic terrorism,” said Sam Nunn, the former Democratic senator from Georgia and an architect of the “cooperative threat reduction” programs of the 1990s.

    Official word came in a terse, three-page agreement signed on Dec. 16. A copy was obtained by the Globe, and a description of the Moscow meeting was provided by three people who attended the session or were briefed on it. They declined to be identified for security reasons.

     Russia’s change of heart was not unexpected.

    The Globe reported in August that US officials were concerned about the future of the programs, because of increased diplomatic hostilities between the United States and Russia. The New York Times reported in November that it appeared likely many of the programs would end.

    RELATED: 8/2014: US-Russia work on nuclear materials in jeopardy

    On hand for the Moscow meeting were nearly four dozen of the leading figures on both sides who have been working to safeguard the largest supplies of the world’s deadliest weapons, according to the three-page agreement.

    The group included officials from the US Department of Energy, its nuclear weapons labs, the Pentagon, and the State Department, and a host of Russian officials in charge of everything from dismantling nuclear submarines to arms control.

    Specialists said the final meeting was a dismaying development in a joint effort that the United States has invested some $2 billion in and had been a symbol of the thaw between East and West and of global efforts to prevent the spread of doomsday weapons. An additional $100 million had been budgeted for the effort this year and many of the programs were envisioned to continue at least through 2018.

    Since the cooperative agreement began, US experts have helped destroy hundreds of weapons and nuclear-powered submarines, pay workers’ salaries, install security measures at myriad facilities containing weapons material across Russia and the former Soviet Union, and conduct training programs for their personnel.

    Officials said estimates of how much bomb-grade material has either been destroyed or secured inside the former Soviet Union is classified but insist the stockpiles are enough to make many hundreds of atomic bombs.

    The work has been driven by deep concern that large supplies of nuclear material could be stolen by terrorists seeking weapons of mass destruction or diverted by underpaid workers susceptible to bribes.

    Russian President Vladimir Putin’s decision last year to invade the Ukrainian territory of Crimea and then back an armed rebellion in eastern Ukraine prompted a series of US and EU sanctions against Russia, which stirred fears that the era of nuclear cooperation was at risk.

    Now security upgrades have been cancelled at some of Russia’s seven “closed nuclear cities,” which contain among the largest stockpiles of highly enriched uranium and plutonium, according to the official “record of meeting” signed by the sides in December.

    The Russians also told the Americans that joint security work at 18 civilian facilities housing weapons material would cease, effective Jan. 1. Another project at two facilities to convert highly enriched uranium into a less dangerous form also has been stopped.

    Lack of US funding and expertise also jeopardizes planned construction of high-tech surveillance systems at 13 buildings that store nuclear material, as well as a project to deploy radiation detectors at Russian ports, airports, and border crossings to catch potential nuclear smugglers.



    A limited amount of cooperation will continue in other countries that have highly enriched uranium that originated in Russia. The two sides also will continue working on ways to secure industrial sources of radioactive material, which could be used to make a “dirty bomb.’’ The Russian decision will not affect inspections that both sides regularly conduct of each other’s active nuclear arsenals as part of arms control treaties.

    But that is little consolation for those like Siegfried S. Hecker, one of the nation’s premier experts on nuclear weapons. Hecker, a former head of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has traveled more than 40 times to Russia since 1992 as part of the joint security efforts. While he said vast improvements have been made in Russia’s atomic security since the end of the Cold War, “you’re never done.”

    “They need continuous attention and international cooperation,” he said in an interview. “You cannot afford to isolate your country, your own nuclear complex, from the rest of the world.”

    The Russian embassy in Washington, and the Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation in Moscow, did not respond to requests for comment. In the December document, the Russians said they are capable of securing their own nuclear facilities, out of Russia’s federal budget.

    But a number of former US government officials and nuclear experts expressed doubts about the Russian pledge, pointing to recent economic troubles.

    “The Russians say they are going to put a lot more of their resources into this,” said Nunn, who is cochairman of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a Washington nonprofit that works to reduce the dangers of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. “That would be good news if they do, but with their economic challenges now and with the huge distrust built because of Ukraine and the deterioration of the ruble, the proof will be in the pudding.”

    Another key architect of the programs, former Republican senator Richard Lugar of Indiana, who last visited some of the facilities in 2012, said he wonders if the Russians have the expertise needed to keep track of the vast amount of nuclear bomb material.

    “The housekeeping by the Russians has not been comprehensive,” Lugar said in an interview. “There had been work done [with the United States] hunting down nuclear materials. This is now terminated.”

    Some warn that the distrust on both sides could bleed into other areas, including arms control treaties.

    “It’s important for the US and Russia to have nuclear security, but it is also important for us to believe we have nuclear security,” said Matthew Bunn, a weapons proliferation specialist at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University. “That’s hard to do just by saying so.”

    US government officials, for their part, insist they are trying to make the best of it.

    “We are encouraged that they statedmultiple times that they intend to finish this work,” said David Huizenga, who runs the nonproliferation programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration, an arm of the Department of Energy. Huizenga led the US delegation to Moscow last month.

    But he said US officials still hope that the Russians will change their mind and restart a partnership that by most accounts has significantly strengthened global security.

    “[It will be] harder to resurrect if we don’t actually engage in any meaningful way,” Huizenga said.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
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    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
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    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Russia Deploys Nuclear ICBM Launchers On Combat Patrol

    Submitted by Tyler Durden on 02/05/2015 12:56 -0500






    Perhaps it is a coincidence that a day before John Kerry's arrival in Kiev (a visit which "coincided" with a 35% devaluation of the local currency) where among other things the US statesman discussed the possibility of official (as opposed to unofficial) deliveries of US "lethal support" to the civil war torn and now hyperinflation country, that Russia decided to put its nuclear ICBMs on combat patrol missions in various Russian regions. Specifically, according to Tass, "About 700 units of military equipment, including launchers are deployed in the positioning areas in the Tver, Ivanovo, Kirov, Irkutsk regions, as well as in Altai Territory and the Mari El republic."



    More:


    The Topol, Topol-M and Yars mobile ballistic missile launchers have been put on combat patrol mission in six Russian regions, Russian Defense Ministry spokesman for Strategic Missile Forces (RVSN) Colonel Igor Yegorov said on Wednesday.

    "The Topol, Topol-M and Yars mobile launchers are drilling combat duty tasks in six regions of the country with extended combat patrolling time. About 700 units of military equipment, including launchers are deployed in the positioning areas in the Tver, Ivanovo, Kirov, Irkutsk regions, as well as in Altai Territory and the Mari El republic," Yegorov said.

    According to him, the time of winter combat patrolling has been extended to nearly a month this year. "This means that each missile regiment will spend about 60 days per year on combat patrolling routes," he said.

    Topol is a ground-based mobile strategic intercontinental ballistic missile system. The Topol-M ICBM system belongs to the fifth generation of strategic missiles. The three-stage solid-propelled single warhead missile has a silo and mobile version. Yars is a solid-propelled mobile and silo-based intercontinental ballistic missile with multiple warhead.

    Now all that is needed is for Emmett Fitz-Hume and Austin Millbarge to show up and to confirm the old saying that "a weapon unused is a useless weapon", especially if said weapon belongs to Northrop Grumman, Lockheed or General Dynamics.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
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    添ou Americans are so gullible.
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    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

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    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  6. #286
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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Emmett Fitz-Hume and Austin Millbarge? LOL
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    You rang?


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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    That sinister 'flexibility' Obama promised Russia finally emerges

    BY ANDREW MALCOLM
    09:44 AM ET


    Then, I'll take my sanctions and go home. (AP)


    Who knew 35 months ago what Barack Obama really meant when he 'secretly' pleaded with Russia's Dmitry Medvedev for patience and space so he could steal the 2012 election and gain more "flexibility."

    "On all these issues, but particularly missile defense, this, this can be solved but it's important for him to give me space," Obama said with a brotherly arm pat, noting 2012 was his last election. Medvedev responded, "I will transmit this information to Vladimir."

    It was long thought that Obama's gaffe, caught on an open mic during one of those frequent summits national leaders feel the need for, dealt only with the Democrat giving away more to Russia on missile defense. (Scroll down to hear the whispers not intended for his own countrymen's ears.)

    But Obama has elongated the nuclear "negotiations" with Iran to no end and Russia's benefit. Obama slapped sanctions on Russia that have surely hurt the Russian economy but produced zero effect on that country's relentless military destabilization of Ukraine.

    And Obama has dithered more than a year now, with many more months to come apparently, over providing vital defensive weapons for Ukraine's elected government to fight Russian-backed insurgents. Obama's Codeword: Strategic Patience. Dmitry and Vlad are no doubt appreciative.

    Obama talked with the Russian leader Tuesday and, according to the White House, the American threatened to raise the costs for his Ukraine intervention. Economic sanctions have not worked there or in Iran, so more of them will?

    Such phone call accounts do not include the other leader's response, which was likely "LOL."

    Obama has vowed to "degrade and ultimately destroy" the terrorist army of ISIS. But he's only bombing here and there. He's ordered retirement of the A-10 Warthog, America's best ground-attack weapon. And Obama has halted purchases of all new Tomahawk missiles. Other than that, Obama's all-in the terrorist fight.

    Now come new Obama prevarications on terrorism. He and aides have performed amusing linguistic contortions to avoid calling Islamic terrorists Islamic terrorists. On Fox News Sunday Gen. Michael Flynn, recently retired head of the Defense Intelligence Agency, warned: "You can't defeat an enemy that you don't admit exists."

    And a new Rasmussen Reports poll finds Americans seeing through Obama's guise. A substantial majority of likely voters say he's not spoken strongly enough against ISIS' atrocities.

    In a lengthy interview with Vox.com, Obama said Americans are being distracted from the most important genuine issue facing the world by a commercial media focusing on scary accounts of terrorist beheadings and fiery deaths.


    Gen. Michael Flynn, Ret. (AP)


    "My first job is to protect the American people," Obama stated. "It is entirely legitimate for the American people to be deeply concerned when you've got a bunch of violent, vicious zealots who behead people or randomly shoot a bunch of folks in a deli in Paris."

    That sounds like someone who could see a clear link between the Crusades of 1096 A.D. and ISIS of 2015.

    Where to begin on Obama's way-too convenient formulation? First of all, an armed Muslim with al Qaeda links walking into a kosher deli to fatally shoot four Parisians, all of them Jews, is hardly a random act of violence. Despite his chronic grandiosity, if Obama says it and aides applaud, that doesn't make it true.

    Secondly, they must not teach Jewish history at Harvard Law School. The name Zealots originally refers to Jews, not deranged Muslim gunmen. Zealots were a first century Jewish sect that practiced violence against Roman occupiers because only God could be their ruler.

    Then, believe it or not, in the interview Obama likened global terrorism to a city's ordinary crime problems that require a vigilant mayor. "But we also have to attend to a lot of other issues," Obama insisted. "And we've got to make sure we're right-sizing our approach so that what we do isn't counterproductive."

    And what, the families of Kayla Mueller or that incinerated Jordanian pilot or the Benghazi Four or anyone who remembers the original 9/11, might ask does this president see as the paramount threat facing the United States today?

    Climate change.

    It's got nothing to do with merit. Americans don't grasp this truth, Obama explains, simply because "it's not a sexy story."

    The scariest part of this latest Oval Office delusion is that, unlike most normal people, the current U.S. commander-in-chief may actually believe it.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
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    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
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    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

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  9. #289
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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Russian Nuclear Missile Forces Conduct Large-Scale Exercises Across Country

    By Dennis Lynch @neato_itsdennis on February 12 2015 9:26 AM



    Russia's Strategic Missile Forces have conducted exercises involving 30 regiments on preparedness, combating chemical weapons attacks and anti-sabotage techniques. Russian Defense Ministry

    Russia’s nuclear missile force staged large-scale exercises across the vast country Thursday consisting of drills to combat sabotage and chemical weapons attacks. More than 30 regiments of the Strategic Missile Forces were involved in 12 regions, according to Itar-Tass, a Russian news agency close to the government.

    “According to the drill scenario, simulated enemy’s sabotage groups planted mines on the combat patrolling route sections and used toxic agents in the field. Engineer troops, radiological, chemical and biological defense forces, as well as anti-sabotage units have been engaged in the exercises,” said Defense Ministry spokesman Col. Igor Yegorov. Russia’s Strategic Missile Forces plan to test-fire their new Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile in 2017. The Sarmat would replace the Cold War-era R-36 missile, nicknamed “Satan” by NATO, which is the largest ICBM ever made.

    Russia’s stockpile of 8,400 nuclear warheads is the largest in the world, surpassing the U.S.’s 7,500. Both nuclear superpowers have taken steps over the last 25 years to reduce their stockpiles under landmark accords agreed upon following the end of the Cold War.

    Meanwhile, the Russian navy launched nuclear combat exercises in international waters in the Arctic last week, which was rumored to be in response to NATO’s plans to bolster defenses in the ex-Soviet Baltic states on Russia’s western border. Russia’s nuclear submarine fleet was involved in the exercises and engaged in simulated ballistic missile launches and Arctic navigation, according to Newsweek.

    The Russian government announced late last year that it would upgrade its nuclear weapons capabilities as a part of a wider military modernization over the next decade. That includes building a "guaranteed nuclear deterrent,” according to President Vladimir Putin.

    Putin emerged Thursday morning from a marathon, 17-hour negotiation with his Ukrainian, French and German counterparts to hammer out a peace deal in Ukraine, where the Ukrainian government and pro-Russian rebels have fought a nearly yearlong conflict that's claimed the lives of more than 5,400 people. The West accuses Putin of directly intervening militarily on behalf of the rebels, but he denies that allegation.

    High tensions over the Ukraine conflict have brought East-West relations to their lowest since the end of the Cold War. Defense officials in NATO member states expressed concern over Russia’s nuclear modernization plans at last week’s Munich Security Conference and discussed upgrading and modernizing their own nuclear deterrent forces in response, according to Reuters.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
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    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  10. #290
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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    This IS real, unlike the fake borg slides.
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons


    Russia To Add 40 New Intercontinental Missiles This Year

    June 16, 2016

    Russia's military will add over 40 new intercontinental ballistic missiles this year alone that are capable of piercing any missile defenses, President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday in a blunt reminder of the nation's nuclear might amid tensions with the West over Ukraine.

    Putin spoke at the opening of an arms show at a shooting range in Alabino just west of Moscow, a huge display intended to showcase Russia's resurgent military.

    NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg accused the Russians of "nuclear saber-rattling," and said that was one of the reasons the western military alliance has been beefing up its ability to defend its members.

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, briefing reporters via teleconference from Boston, where he is recovering from surgery on a broken leg, called Putin's announcement concerning.

    "We're trying to move in the opposite direction," Kerry said. "We have had enormous cooperation from the 1990s forward with respect to the structure of nuclear weapons in the former territories of the Soviet Union. And no one wants to see us step backwards."

    He said Putin could be posturing.

    "It's really hard to tell," Kerry said. "But nobody should hear that kind of an announcement from the leader of a powerful country and not be concerned about the implications."

    Russia-West relations have plunged to their lowest point since Cold War times over Moscow's annexation of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula and support for a pro-Russia separatist insurgency in eastern Ukraine. The U.S. and the EU have slapped Russia with economic sanctions, and Washington and its NATO allies have pondered an array of measures in response to Russia's moves.

    The three Baltic members of the alliance, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, have asked NATO to permanently deploy ground troops to their nations as a deterrent against an increasingly assertive Russia. And Polish Defense Minister Tomasz Siemoniak says he and U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter have held talks about placing U.S. heavy army equipment in Poland.

    The NATO chief said he expected Carter to brief other alliance members on the proposal to stockpile tanks and other weapons and supplies in Eastern Europe during a NATO defense ministers meeting next week.

    "I welcome all efforts to defend and protect allies," Stoltenberg said in Brussels.

    Moscow bristled at the plans, warning Washington that the deployment of new U.S. weapons near Russian borders would foment dangerous instability in Europe.

    "The United States is inciting tensions and carefully nurturing their European allies' anti-Russian phobias in order to use the current difficult situation for further expanding its military presence and influence in Europe," the Russian Foreign Ministry said.

    "We hope that reason will prevail and it will be possible to save the situation in Europe from sliding toward a military standoff, which could entail dangerous consequences," the ministry added.

    The NATO chief said the alliance had to respond to Russia's actions by "increasing the readiness and the preparedness of our forces."

    "We are responding by making sure that NATO also in the future is an alliance which provides deterrence and protection for all allies against any threat," Stoltenberg said.

    In his speech at the arms show, Putin vowed to continue a big arms modernization program despite the nation's economic downturn. He specifically mentioned the Armata tanks and other new armored vehicles, which were first shown to the public during a Red Square military parade last month.

    The Russian leader also noted the military was to start testing its new long-range early warning radar intended to monitor the western border and later will deploy another one in the east.

    "Over 40 new intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of penetrating any, even the most technologically advanced missile defense systems, will join the nuclear forces in the current year," he said.

    Last year, the military received 38 ICBMs, according to Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu. Modernizing the nation's nuclear forces is a top priority for the military, which needs to gradually decommission its aging Soviet-built ICBMs.

    Stoltenberg described the Russian arms buildup as destabilizing.

    "They are developing new nuclear capabilities and they are also using nuclear rhetoric more in the way they are messaging their defense strategy and defense posture," Stoltenberg said. "This nuclear saber-rattling of Russia is unjustified. It's destabilizing and it's dangerous."

    Putin said the re-armament program should help encourage the nation's economic growth and spearhead innovations. Independent experts warn, however, that a weapons upgrade that envisages spending 22 trillion rubles (over $400 billion) on new weapons through 2020 would be an unbearable burden now when the Russian economy has plunged into recession.

    Despite the gloomy economic outlook, Russian arms makers used the arms show to publicize costly new weapons that even the Soviet Union couldn't afford.

    The navy revealed a project of an aircraft carrier capable of carrying 90 aircraft. It also showed a mock-up of a new amphibious landing ship, a vessel similar to the Mistral-class ship built on Russian orders in France, whose delivery has been suspended over the Ukrainian crisis.

    Amid the current spike in Russia-West tensions, Washington accused Moscow of violating its obligations under a landmark nuclear arms control treaty by flight-testing a ground-launched cruise missile with a range prohibited by the treaty. Russia rejected the accusations, and, in its turn, alleged that some elements of the U.S. missile defense shield violate the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces, or INF, treaty.

    The RIA Novosti news agency on Tuesday quoted Russia's Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov as saying that Moscow is ready to hold consultations to discuss the mutual complaints.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    It just goes to show how clueless the fuckwits in this administration are. "We're cutting nuclear arms, love us". Putin: "I'm building more, fuck you"
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Pentagon Quietly Concerned About Defending US Cities From Russian Cruise Missile First Strike



    June 18, 2015 By Marcus Weisgerber

    The military moves to set up an expensive sensor-and-shooter network, but is the threat real?

    Marcus Weisgerber is the global business reporter for Defense One, where he writes about the intersection of business and national security. He has been covering defense and national security issues for nearly a decade, previously as Pentagon correspondent for Defense News and chief editor of ... Full Bio

    The plan calls for buying radars that would enable National Guard F-16 fighter jets to spot and shoot down fast and low-flying missiles. Top generals want to network those radars with sensor-laden aerostat balloons hovering over U.S. cities and with coastal warships equipped with sensors and interceptor missiles of their own.

    One of those generals is Adm. William Gortney, who leads U.S. Northern Command, or NORTHCOM, and North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD. Earlier this year, Gortney submitted an “urgent need” request to put AESA radars on the F-16s that patrol the airspace around Washington. Such a request allows a project to circumvent the normal procurement process.

    While no one will talk openly about the Pentagon’s overall cruise missile defense plans, much of which remain classified, senior military officials have provided clues in speeches, congressional hearings and other public forums over the past year. The statements reveal the Pentagon’s concern about advanced cruise missiles being developed by Russia.

    “We’re devoting a good deal of attention to ensuring we’re properly configured against such an attack in the homeland, and we need to continue to do so,” Adm. Sandy Winnefeld, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said during a May 19 speech at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in Washington.

    We’re devoting a good deal of attention to ensuring we’re properly configured against such an attack in the homeland, and we need to continue to do so.
    Adm. Sandy Winnefeld, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    In recent years, the Pentagon has invested heavily, with mixed results, in ballistic missile defense: preparations to shoot down long-range rockets that touch the edge of space and then fall toward targets on Earth. Experts say North Korea and Iran are the countries most likely to strike the U.S. or its allies with such missiles, although neither arsenal has missiles of sufficient range so far.

    (Related: The Middle East Has Four Minutes To Act If Iran Fires a Missile)

    But the effort to defend the U.S. mainland against smaller, shorter-range cruise missiles has gone largely unnoticed.

    “While ballistic missile defense has now become established as a key military capability, the corresponding counters to cruise missiles have been prioritized far more slowly,” said Thomas Karako, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in Washington. “In some ways, this is understandable, in terms of the complexity of the threat, but sophisticated cruise missile technologies now out there are just not going away and we are going to have to find a way to deal with this — for the homeland, for allies and partners abroad, and for regional combatant commanders.”

    Intercepting cruise missiles is far different from shooting down a missile of the ballistic variety. Launched by ships, submarines, or even trailer-mounted launchers, cruise missiles are powered throughout their entire flight. This allows them to fly close to the ground and maneuver throughout flight, making them difficult for radar to spot.

    “A handful of senior military officials, including several current or past NORTHCOM commanders, have been among those quietly dinging the bell about cruise missile threats, and it’s beginning to be heard,” Karako said.

    While many of the combatant commanders — the 4-star generals and admirals who command forces in various geographic regions of the world — believe cruise missiles pose a threat to the United States, they have had trouble convincing their counterparts in the military services who decide what arms to buy.

    A handful of senior military officials, including several current or past NORTHCOM commanders, have been among those quietly dinging the bell about cruise missile threats, and it’s beginning to be heard
    Thomas Karako, missile defense analyst at CSIS

    Fast-track requests like Gortney’s demand for new radars on F-16s have been used over the past decade to quickly get equipment to troops on the battlefield. Other urgent operational needs have included putting a laser seeker on a Maverick missile to strike fast-moving vehicles and to buy tens of thousands of MRAP vehicles that were rushed to Iraq to protect soldiers from roadside bomb attacks.

    Last August, at a missile defense conference in Huntsville, Ala., then-NORTHCOM and NORAD commander Gen. Charles Jacoby criticized the Army and other services for failing to fund cruise missile defense projects. NORTHCOM, based in Colorado, is responsible for defending the United States from such attacks.

    “I’m trying to get a service to grab hold of it … but so far we’re not having a lot of success with that,” Jacoby said when asked by an attendee about the Pentagon’s cruise missile defense plans. “I’m glad you brought that up and gave me a chance to rail against my service for not doing the cruise missile work that I need them to do.”

    But since then, NORTHCOM has been able to muster support in Congress and at the Pentagon for various related projects. “We’ve made a case that growing cruise missile technology in our state adversaries, like Russia and China, present a real problem for our current defenses,” Jacoby said.

    One item at the center of these plans is a giant aerostat called JLENS, short for the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. The Pentagon is testing the system at Maryland’s Aberdeen Proving Ground, a sprawling military complex north of Baltimore. Reporters have even been invited to see the tethered airship, which hovers 10,000 feet in the air.

    We’ve made a case that growing cruise missile technology in our state adversaries, like Russia and China, present a real problem for our current defenses.
    Gen. Charles Jacoby, former commander, NORTHCOM and NORAD

    JLENS carries a powerful radar on its belly that Pentagon officials say can spot small moving objects – including cruise missiles – from Boston to Norfolk, Va., headquarters of the U.S. Navy’s Atlantic Fleet. Since it’s so high in the air, it can see farther than ground radars.

    JLENS is in the early stages of a three-year test phase, but comments by senior military officials indicate the Pentagon in considering expanding this use of aerostats far beyond the military’s National Capital Region district.

    “This is a big country and we probably couldn’t protect the entire place from cruise missile attack unless we want to break the bank,” Winnefeld said. “But there are important areas in this country we need to make sure are defended from that kind of attack.”

    New missile interceptors could also play a role in the network too.

    “We’re also looking at the changing-out of the kinds of systems that we would use to knock down any cruise missiles headed towards our nation’s capital,” Winnefeld said.

    Ground-launched versions of ship- and air-launched interceptors could be installed around major cities or infrastructure, experts say. Raytheon, which makes shipborne SM-6 interceptors, announced earlier this year that it was working on a ground-launched, long-range version of the AMRAAM air-to-air missile.

    The improvements make the missiles “even faster and more maneuverable,” the company said in a statement when the announcement was made at the IDEX international arms show in Abu Dhabi in February.

    The Threat

    Driving the concern at the Pentagon is Russia’s development of the Kh-101, an air-launched cruise missile with a reported range of more than 1,200 miles.

    (Related: The US Missile System Driving a Wedge Between China, South Korea)

    “The only nation that has an effective cruise missile capability is Russia,” Gortney said at a March 19 House Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee hearing.

    Russian cruise missiles can also be fired from ships and submarines. Moscow has also developed containers that could potentially conceal a cruise missile on a cargo ship, meaning it wouldn’t take a large nation’s trained military to strike American shores.

    The only nation that has an effective cruise missile capability is Russia.

    Adm. William Gortney, commander of U.S. Northern Command

    “Cruise missile technology is available and it’s exportable and it’s transferrable,” Jacoby said. “So it won’t be just state actors that present that threat to us.”

    During the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, American and Kuwaiti Patriot missiles intercepted a number of Iraqi ballistic missiles, Karako said. But they missed all five cruise missiles fired, including one fired at Marine headquarters in Kuwait. In 2006, Hezbollah hit an Israeli corvette ship with an Iranian-supplied, Chinese-designed, anti-ship cruise missile, Karako said.

    Shooting down the missiles themselves is a pricy proposition, which has led Pentagon officials to focus on the delivery platform.

    “The best way to defeat the cruise missile threat is to shoot down the archer, or sink the archer, that’s out there,” Gortney said at an April news briefing at the Pentagon.

    At a congressional hearing in March, Gortney said the Pentagon needed to expand its strategy to “hit that archer.”

    An existing network of radars, including the JLENS, and interceptors make defending Washington easier than the rest of the country.

    “[T]he national capital region is the easier part in terms of the entire kill chain,” Maj. Gen. Timothy Ray, director of Global Power Programs in the Air Force acquisition directorate, said in March at a House Armed Services Tactical Air and Land Forces Subcommittee hearing. “We remain concerned about the coverage for the rest of the country and the rest of the F-16 fleet.”

    Winnefeld said that the JLENS and “other systems we are putting in place” would “greatly enhance our early warning around the National Capital Region.”...

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Thanks for posting that vector!

    Good to see some in charge still have the balls to protect the US. Would be great to see what they could do with a decent CIC.

    We could outclass the Russians and Chinese at every turn if we had the will.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons


    Russia Adds 111 Warheads Under Arms Treaty

    Moscow warheads above New START treaty limit

    October 9, 2015
    By Bill Gertz

    Russia has now deployed more than 100 nuclear warheads in its strategic arsenal above the limits set by the New START arms treaty limits—two years before it must meet treaty arms reduction goals.

    New START nuclear warhead and delivery system numbers made public Oct. 1 reveal that since the 2010 arms accord went into force, Moscow increased the number of deployed nuclear warheads by a total of 111 weapons for a total of 1,648 deployed warheads. That number is 98 warheads above the treaty limit of 1,150 warheads that must be reached by the 2018 deadline of the treaty.

    At the same time, U.S. nuclear warheads, missiles, and bombers have fallen sharply and remain below the required levels under the New START pact.

    The United States during the same period of the Russian increases cut its deployed nuclear arsenal by 250 warheads.

    The Russian increases and U.S. cuts bolster claims by critics who say the arms treaty is one-sided in constraining U.S. forces while the Russians appear to be ignoring the treaty limits as part of a major strategic forces buildup of missiles, submarines, and bombers.

    Additionally, nuclear analysts say recent actions and statements suggest Russia may be preparing to jettison the New START treaty.

    “Russia may pull out of the New START before it requires any Russians reductions,” said former Pentagon nuclear policymaker Mark Schneider. “Director of the Russian Foreign Ministry’s department of security and disarmament issues, Mikhail Ulyanov, said so in 2014 and 2015.”

    U.S. nuclear forces in 2011 included 882 land- and sea-based missiles and bombers, 1,800 deployed nuclear warheads, and 1,124 non-deployed launchers and bombers.

    The United States today has 762 ICBMs, submarine-launched missiles and heavy bombers, 1,538 warheads and 898 non-deployed weapons.

    For the same categories, Russia added five missiles for a total of 526, and 12 non-deployed launchers and bombers for a total of 877.

    The Air Force in August carried out the first showing for Russian nuclear inspectors of a converted nuclear-capable B-52H bomber to a non-nuclear aircraft under the treaty. The bomber exhibition took place in September and thus was not counted in the latest U.S. figures for bomber cuts.

    Additionally, the Navy also showed the first nuclear missile submarine with converted launch tubes under the treaty last month.

    The United States plans to eliminate 98 launchers and heavy bombers under the treaty to reach the 800 treaty level for launchers and bombers by 2018.

    Plans call for converting 30 B-52H bombers and 56 submarine-launched ballistic missile launchers and send 12 B-52Hs to the aircraft bone yard.

    “To date, our reductions have been for inactive or weapon systems without a nuclear mission—104 ICBM launch facilities, 51 B-52Gs, and converting B-1s to conventional-only under the treaty,” said one defense official.

    By contrast, Russia under Vladimir Putin is embarked on a major strategic nuclear forces buildup that includes new missile submarines, upgrading older missile submarines and adding several new strategic missiles. Moscow, like the U.S. Air Force, is also planning a new bomber.

    Additionally, Russia under Putin has announced a new doctrine that places a greater emphasis on nuclear forces.

    During the crisis over Russia’s military annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea, Putin made threats to use nuclear forces against the Untied States and NATO if there were intervention to reverse the annexation.

    Russian officials also have made nuclear threats against the United States in response to reports that NATO plans to move military forces into Eastern Europe in response to Russian threats.

    Rep. Mike Rogers, chairman of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, said Russia “is in the business of violating treaties.”

    “From the Intermediate range Nuclear Forces Treaty, to the Open Skies Treaty, to other conventional and unconventional arms control agreements—Russia violates any treaty or agreement that puts limits on capabilities that Mr. Putin and his cronies desire,” Rogers said. “Russia’s arguable adherence to the New START Treaty just indicates how bad a deal it is for the United States.”

    The nuclear numbers were disclosed by the State Department’s bureau of arms control, verification, and compliance.

    Blake Narendra, a State Department spokesperson for the arms control bureau, said officials are aware of the increase in Russian deployed warheads and delivery vehicles. But he sought to play down the buildup.

    “The United States and Russia continue to implement the New START Treaty in a business-like manner,” Narendra said. “We fully expect Russia to meet the New START Treaty central limits in accordance with the stipulated timeline of February 2018.”

    By that date, Moscow and Washington must reach limits of no more than 700 deployed treaty limited delivery vehicles and 1,550 deployed warheads.

    Despite the U.S. cuts, Narendra said “our declared forces show clearly that the United States maintains a capable deterrent force capable of defending our interests and those of our friends and allies.”

    The increase in Russian numbers was anticipated as Moscow replaces older weapons, Narendra said, adding “we have known for a long time about Russia’s modernization of its strategic nuclear arsenal.”

    The spokesman defended the utility of the treaty despite the Russian buildup that has included unprecedented nuclear threats against NATO. The treaty provides knowledge of numbers and locations of Russian strategic forces “at a time when we need it the most,” he said.

    Schneider, now a senior analyst at the National Institute for Public Policy, said Russia is now at the highest level of deployed nuclear warheads since the New START treaty went into force.

    “For the last three reporting periods—18 months—Russia has moved from below New START limits in deployed warheads and deployed delivery vehicles to above them,” said Schneider.

    “In all three limited categories—deployed warheads, deployed delivery vehicles and deployed and non-deployed delivery vehicles—Russia is above its entry into force numbers from 2011”.

    Schneider said a flaw in the treaty counting numbers allowed the Russians to under count bomber weapons so that Russia may have between 400 to 500 more bomber-delivered warheads than the United States.

    “The U.S. left may not think this is very important, but the Russians do and it is their finger on the Russian nuclear trigger,” Schneider said.

    Adm. William Gortney, commander of the U.S. Northern Command, which is in charge of defending the continental United States, said Russia is qualitatively building up its military forces, with a new doctrine and, in particular, new cruise missiles capable of hitting the United States from Russian airspace.

    “They’ve read our play book and they’re putting in force, they’re fielding cruise missiles that are very, very accurate, very long range,” Gortney said Wednesday in remarks to the Atlantic Council, a think tank.

    The new missile has been identified by other defense officials as a KH-101 air launched cruise missile that can be armed with either nuclear or conventional warheads.

    The missile can reach U.S. infrastructure targets in Canada and the United States from launch points within Russian air space, Gortney said.

    Gortney said the Russians have been “messaging” the United States with long-range nuclear-capable bomber flights along U.S. and Canadian borders.

    War game scenarios in recent months have included simulated Russian conventional cruise missile strikes on long-range early warning radar in Alaska, he said.

    The military blog Russianforces.org said the increase of 66 Russian warheads and nine launchers since March, when the last treaty numbers were released, probably reflects Moscow’s deployment of new submarine-launched Bulava missiles on the new submarine Alexander Nevsky, launched in April.

    Army Lt. Col. Martin O’Donnell, a spokesman for the U.S. Strategic Command, said the treaty “continues to enhance security and strategic stability.”

    “We fully expect Russia to meet the New START Treaty central limits in accordance with the stipulated timeline of February 2018,” he said.

    Thomas Moore, a former professional staff member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee who specialized in arms control, said he is not surprised the Russians are over treaty limits while the the United States is below them.

    “But I guess we are under it early because ‘business-like’ implementation of the treaty is a way the administration can appear to be doing something, and they have a base of left-wing support which demands we go lower still, and faster,” Moore said.

    Russia has been building up its forces steadily, he added.

    “Its raid of Kalibr cruise missiles from the Caspian to targets in Syria is another sign that, along with New START warhead numbers, its nuclear-capable systems, strategic warheads, and overall nuclear capability at all ranges and with all types of weapons is building up, not down.”

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    Peace out, fools! Obama plays the clown by flashing the peace sign for nuclear security summit 'team photo'... and gets a very unimpressed look from David Cameron and bemused world leaders



    • President Barack Obama is meeting dozens of world leaders for a nuclear summit in Washington, DC, today
    • He gave the peace sign as the group stood together for a 'team photo' - bemusing dozens of the world's politicians
    • Prime Minister David Cameron looked less than impressed by Obama's behavior amid a strained special relationship
    • Obama recently slammed Cameron for being 'distracted' during the crisis in Libya and turning it into a 's**t show'
    • World leaders discussed nuclear terrorist threats as well as the controversial Iran deal at the summit


    By Ollie Gillman For Dailymail.com
    Published: 13:55 EST, 1 April 2016 | Updated: 19:23 EST, 1 April 2016

    Surrounded by world leaders, President Barack Obama gave the peace sign as they gathered for a 'team photo' during a two-day nuclear summit.
    All eyes were on Obama as 54 other presidents and prime ministers joined him in Washington, DC, for crunch talks on Iran and terrorist threats involving nuclear weapons.

    There was one set of eyes, however, that was particularly focused on the President - those of Prime Minister David Cameron.
    Relations between Cameron and Obama have been strained since the President criticized the Prime Minister for getting 'distracted' during the crisis in Libya and turning it into a 's**t show'.

    There was more than metaphorical distance between the pair at today's summit, with Cameron only able to glare at Obama from across the podium as he was elbowed out to the edge of the stage.

    Scroll down for video


    +18


    Peace, man: Surrounded by world leaders, President Barack Obama gave the peace sign at the end of a nuclear security summit today






    Special relationship in tatters? All eyes were on Obama (left) as 54 other presidents and prime ministers joined him in Washington - including those of David Cameron (right)



    Give us a wave, Dave! While the rest of the gathered leaders waved for the cameras, Cameron failed to lift his hand up






    Arms folded: Cameron - fresh from his vacation in Lanzarote - did not appear to be playing ball with an energetic President Obama


    Isolated: While Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (left) hit it off during the talks, Cameron (right) cut a lonely figure

    After a day of tense, sensitive discussions on ISIS and the Middle East, Obama played up for the cameras as he grinned and held up the peace sign.

    The President has come under fire for his relaxed attitude in recent weeks.

    On a state visit to Argentina, he was seen dancing the tango with an attractive female dancer. On a historic visit to Cuba, he went to a baseball game instead of returning to the United States to respond to the horrific terrorist attacks in Brussels.

    Before that, Obama chose not to attend the funeral of former First Lady Nancy Reagan, electing to go to a music festival and eat tacos instead.
    While the President was surrounded by power players Chinese President Xi Jinping, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte and Jordanian King Abdullah II ibn Al Hussein at the summit, Cameron was left languishing at the end of a row alongside Algeria's prime minister Abdelmalek Sellal.

    Earlier today, Obama spoke of the threat of nuclear weapons falling into the wrong hands, such as those of ISIS terrorists.

    The President said no terrorist group had succeeded in getting hold of making a dirty bomb, but said al-Qaeda wanted to and ISIS had already used chemical weapons in the Middle East.

    He said there was no doubt that if ISIS 'mad men' got a nuclear bomb, they would use it to kill as many people as possible. Obama gave a chilling warning that such a catastrophic disaster would 'change our world'.

    'We have measurably reduced the risk,' Obama said. But he added: 'The threat of nuclear terrorism persists and continues to evolve.'

    And he warned that as ISIS comes under greater pressure it will likely carry out more attacks elsewhere.

    'As ISIL is squeezed in Syria and Iraq, we can anticipate it lashing out elsewhere, as we've seen most recently and tragically in countries from Turkey to Brussels,' Obama said - using another acronym for ISIS.

    Despite Obama's warnings - and his hi-jinks during the photograph with other world leaders - Donald Trump's earlier comments on nuclear weapons cast a shadow over the summit.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...d-leaders.html

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    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons

    I'll do you one better vector...

    This is not an April Fool.


    Russia Doubling Nuclear Warheads

    New multiple-warhead missiles to break arms treaty limit

    April 1, 2016
    By Bill Gertz

    Russia is doubling the number of its strategic nuclear warheads on new missiles by deploying multiple reentry vehicles that have put Moscow over the limit set by the New START arms treaty, according to Pentagon officials.

    A recent intelligence assessment of the Russian strategic warhead buildup shows that the increase is the result of the addition of multiple, independently targetable reentry vehicles, or MIRVs, on recently deployed road-mobile SS-27 and submarine-launched SS-N-32 missiles, said officials familiar with reports of the buildup.

    “The Russians are doubling their warhead output,” said one official. “They will be exceeding the New START [arms treaty] levels because of MIRVing these new systems.”

    The 2010 treaty requires the United States and Russia to reduce deployed warheads to 1,550 warheads by February 2018.

    The United States has cut its warhead stockpiles significantly in recent years. Moscow, however, has increased its numbers of deployed warheads and new weapons.

    The State Department revealed in January that Russia currently has exceeded the New START warhead limit by 98 warheads, deploying a total number of 1,648 warheads. The U.S. level currently is below the treaty level at 1,538 warheads.

    Officials said that in addition to adding warheads to the new missiles, Russian officials have sought to prevent U.S. weapons inspectors from checking warheads as part of the 2010 treaty.

    The State Department, however, said it can inspect the new MIRVed missiles.

    Disclosure of the doubling of Moscow’s warhead force comes as world leaders gather in Washington this week to discus nuclear security—but without Russian President Vladimir Putin, who skipped the conclave in an apparent snub of the United States.

    The Nuclear Security Summit is the latest meeting of world leaders seeking to pursue President Obama’s 2009 declaration of a world without nuclear arms.

    Russia, however, is embarked on a major strategic nuclear forces build-up under Putin. Moscow is building new road-mobile, rail-mobile, and silo-based intercontinental-range missiles, along with new submarines equipped with modernized missiles. A new long-range bomber is also being built.

    “Russia’s modernization program and their nuclear deterrent force is of concern,” Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Strategic Command, which is in charge of nuclear forces, told Congress March 10.

    “When you look at what they’ve been modernizing, it didn’t just start,” Haney said. “They’ve been doing this quite frankly for some time with a lot of crescendo of activity over the last decade and a half.”

    By contrast, the Pentagon is scrambling to find funds to pay for modernizing aging U.S. nuclear forces after seven years of sharp defense spending cuts under Obama.

    Earlier this month, Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told Congress that Russia continues to pose the greatest threat to the United States.

    “The one that has the greatest capability and poses the greatest threat to the United States is Russia because of its capabilities—its nuclear capability, its cyber capability, and clearly because of some of the things we have seen in its leadership behavior over the last couple of years,” Dunford said.

    In addition to a large-scale nuclear buildup, Russia has upgraded its nuclear doctrine and its leaders and officials have issued numerous threats to use nuclear arms against the United States in recent months, compounding fears of a renewed Russian threat.

    Blake Narendra, spokesman for the State Department’s arms control, verification, and compliance bureau, said the Russian warhead build-up is the result of normal fluctuations due to modernization prior to the compliance deadline.

    “The Treaty has no interim limits,” Narendra told the Free Beacon. “We fully expect Russia to meet the New START treaty central limits in accordance with the stipulated timeline of February 2018. The treaty provides that by that date both sides must have no more than 700 deployed treaty-limited delivery vehicles and 1,550 deployed warheads.”

    Both the United States and Russia continue to implement the treaty in “a business-like manner,” he added.

    Mark Schneider, a former Pentagon official involved in strategic nuclear forces, however, said he has warned for years that Russia is not reducing its nuclear forces under the treaty.

    Since the New START arms accord, Moscow has eliminated small numbers of older SS-25 road-mobile missiles. But the missiles were replaced with new multiple-warhead SS-27s.

    “The Russians have not claimed to have made any reductions for five years,” Schneider said

    Additionally, Russian officials deceptively sought to make it appear their nuclear forces have been reduced during a recent nuclear review conference.

    “If they could have claimed to have made any reductions under New START counting rules they would have done it there,” Schneider said.

    The Obama administration also has been deceptive about the benefits of New START.

    “The administration public affairs talking points on New START reductions border on outright lies,” Schneider said.

    “The only reductions that have been made since New START entry into force have been by the United States,” he said. “Instead, Russia has moved from below the New START limits to above the New START limits in deployed warheads and deployed delivery vehicles.”

    Deployment of new multiple-warhead SS-27s and SS-N-32s are pushing up the Russian warhead numbers. Published Russian reports have stated the missiles will be armed with 10 warheads each.

    Former Defense Secretary William Perry said Thursday that New START was “very helpful” in promoting strategic stability but that recent trends in nuclear weapons are “very, very bad.”

    “When President Obama made his speech in Prague, I thought we were really set for major progress in this field [disarmament],” Perry said in remarks at the Atlantic Council.

    However, Russian “hostility” to the United States ended the progress. “Everything came to a grinding halt and we’re moving in reverse,” Perry said.

    Other nuclear powers that are expanding their arsenals include China and Pakistan, Perry said.

    Perry urged further engagement with Russia on nuclear weapons. “We do have a common interest in preventing a nuclear catastrophe,” he said.

    Perry is advocating that the United States unilaterally eliminate all its land-based missiles and rely instead on nuclear missile submarines and bombers for deterrence.

    However, he said his advocacy of the policy “may be pursuing a mission impossible.”

    “I highly doubt the Russians would follow suit” by eliminating their land-based missiles, the former secretary said.

    Additionally, Moscow is building a new heavy ICBM called Sarmat, code-named SS-X-30 by the Pentagon, that will be equipped with between 10 and 15 warheads per missile. And a new rail-based ICBM is being developed that will also carry multiple warheads.

    Another long-range missile, called the SS-X-31, is under development and will carry up to 12 warheads.

    Schneider, the former Pentagon official, said senior Russian arms officials have been quoted in press reports discussing Moscow’s withdrawal from the New START arms accord. If that takes place, Russia will have had six and a half years to prepare to violate the treaty limits, at the same time the United States will have reduced its forces to treaty limits.

    “Can they comply with New START? Yes. They can download their missile warheads and do a small number to delivery systems reductions,” Schneider said. “Will they? I doubt it. If they don’t start to do something very soon they are likely to pull the plug on the treaty. I don’t see them uploading the way they have, only to download in the next two years.”

    The White House said Moscow’s failure to take part in the nuclear summit was a sign of self-isolation based on the West’s sanctions aimed at punishing Russia for the military takeover of Ukraine’s Crimea.

    A Russian official said the snub by Putin was directed at Obama.

    “This summit is particularly important for the USA and for Obama—this is probably why Moscow has decided to go for this gesture and show its outrage with the West’s policy in this manner,” Alexei Arbatov, director of the Center for International Security at the Russian Academy of Sciences, told the business newspaper Vedomosti.

    A Russian Foreign Ministry official, Mikhail Ulyanov, told RIA Novosti that the summit was not needed.

    “There is no need for it, to be honest,” he said, adding that nuclear security talks should be the work of nuclear physicists, intelligence services, and engineers.

    “The political agenda of the summits has long been exhausted,” Ulyanov said.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons


    Why Russia Is Rebuilding Its Nuclear Arsenal

    April 4, 2016

    Vladimir Putin skipped the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington last week—one more sign that Russia isn't interested in cutting its arms.

    On Friday evening, at the end of the final nuclear security summit of his tenure, President Barack Obama took a swipe at his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, for standing in the way of nuclear disarmament. Obama’s remark was pointed, calling out Putin by name, and it cast a rare bit of light on the personal clash between the two presidents on an issue that both of them see as central to their legacies.

    “Because of the vision that he’s been pursuing of emphasizing military might,” Obama told reporters at the summit, “we have not seen the type of progress that I would have hoped for with Russia.”

    This was putting it lightly. Over the course of Obama’s presidency, Russia has managed to negotiate deep cuts to the U.S. arsenal while substantially strengthening of its own. It has allegedly violated the treaty that limits the deployment of nuclear weapons in Europe and, in the last few years, it has brought disarmament talks with the U.S. to a complete standstill for the first time since the 1960s. In its rhetoric, Moscow has also returned to a habit of nuclear threats, while in its military exercises, it has begun to practice for a nuclear strike, according to the NATO military alliance.

    But of all these stark reversions to the posture of the Cold War, nothing expressed Russia’s position on nuclear disarmament more clearly than Putin’s decision to skip the nuclear summit in Washington last week. Apart from North Korea, which was not invited to the talks, Russia was the only nuclear power not to send a senior delegate.

    The snub was no surprise. It was announced back on Nov. 5 in a statement from the Russian Foreign Ministry, which offered a curious explanation. By influencing the policies of global watchdogs like the International Atomic Energy Agency, “Washington is trying to take the role of the main and the privileged ‘player’ in this sphere,” the statement said. In part because of this, “we have shared with our American colleagues our doubts about the ‘added value’ of the forum.” Russia therefore saw no need to participate, the Ministry said.

    A few days after that statement, the world got a more colorful reminder of Putin’s position on nuclear disarmament. During a meeting at the Kremlin with his top generals on Nov. 10, he accused the U.S. of trying to “neutralize” Russia’s nuclear arsenal by building a missile shield over Europe, one that could knock Russian rockets out of the sky. In response, he said, Russia would have to “strengthen the potential of its strategic nuclear forces,” including the deployment of “attack systems” capable of piercing any missile shield.

    As if on cue, a state television camera then zoomed in on a piece of paper that one of the generals was holding in his hand. It showed the plans for a nuclear device codenamed Status-6, complete with a curt definition of its purpose: “to create an extensive zone of radioactive contamination” along the enemy’s coast, rendering it uninhabitable “for a long time.”

    Asked to comment the following day, Putin’s spokesman claimed the image had appeared in the nightly news by mistake. But the Kremlin’s mouthpiece newspaper then followed up with details. The warhead inside Status-6, it said, would likely be covered in cobalt, an element which would “guarantee the destruction of all living things” once it was irradiated and scattered by a nuclear explosion.

    Vladimir Dvorkin, a retired major general of the Russian strategic rocket forces, remembers such designs from his days developing nuclear submarines for the former Soviet Union. “It’s an old Soviet brainchild,” he told me by phone from Moscow. But he never expected to see it revived. In the 1990s and during first two years of Putin’s presidency, Dvorkin headed the main nuclear research directorate of the Russian Ministry of Defense. The emphasis throughout those years was on cooperating with the U.S. to secure nuclear stockpiles and keep them out of the hands of terrorists.

    The reemergence of Status-6—even if more as a propaganda ploy than as an actual weapon—shows just how far relations have fallen since then. “The idea is to creep up on the seaboard of the United States and set off a massive nuclear explosion,” says Dvorkin. “It’s being revived in order to spook the West.”

    Few in the West had expected to hear such spook stories again. For Americans, a nuclear arms race is the stuff of Cold War fiction. But for Russians, or at least their leaders, the world still looks much as it did in the age of the nuclear arms race.

    That became clear to many of Obama’s top advisers soon after his Administration took office. During a landmark speech in Prague in the spring of 2009, Obama described his vision for a nuclear-free world. The timing and venue were both highly symbolic. Earlier the same week, the newly-elected President had come to Europe for a summit of the NATO alliance, which had just extended membership to two more formerly communist nations, Albania and Croatia, moving the military bloc deeper into Moscow’s former zone of influence.

    Prague, too, had been a key Cold War battleground, and as Obama pointed out at the beginning of his speech, few people could have imagined in those years that the Czech Republic would eventually become a NATO member in 2004, standing as proof that Russian dominance of Eastern Europe was receding. “The Cold War has disappeared,” Obama told the city square packed with his Czech admirers. Yet the existence of nuclear weapons, he said, was its “most dangerous legacy.” He promised to work towards abolishing them.

    The previous week, the White House had begun talks with the Kremlin on an arms reduction treaty it called New Start. But the two sides came to the table with very different ambitions. “We wanted to get rid of as many nuclear weapons as we could,” says Michael McFaul, who was then serving as Obama’s top adviser on Russian affairs. The Kremlin did not seem to share that dream. During one round of talks at the Defense Ministry in Moscow early in 2010, Obama’s Prague speech came up in some idle conversation, McFaul says, and the Russians started laughing. “They said, ‘Yeah, of course you guys want a nuclear-free world, because then you would dominate the world with your conventional weapons. Why would we ever want to do that?’”

    For Russia, the Cold War had never simply disappeared. It had resulted in defeat and the loss of empire, leaving Russia’s rival of more than 40 years to dictate the terms of peace in Europe. By the time Putin took power in 2000, the only vestige of his country’s superpower status was its nuclear arsenal, which was still the biggest in the world. So he began to use it as a crutch.

    “Even in the darkest days of the Russian military, when they weren’t able to afford to pay their soldiers and fly their airplanes, they paid close attention to the readiness and modernization of their nuclear forces,” says David Ochmanek, who served as a U.S. Air Force officer during the Cold War and, between 2009 and 2014, was the Pentagon’s top official for force development. “Their doctrine reflected this,” he says.

    In one of his first acts as President, Putin adopted a new military doctrine in the spring of 2000, one that rejected the Soviet pledge never to launch a nuclear weapon first. His reasoning was simple: only Russia’s nukes could counter the vastly superior strength of U.S. conventional weapons. So he lowered the bar for using nuclear weapons in situations “critical to national security.” This meant that if Russia ever felt badly outgunned in a military conflict, it could launch a nuclear missile to even the score and make the enemy back off. That doctrine was still in place when the U.S. and Russia began negotiating the New Start treaty.

    But Putin’s position in Russia had changed. In 2008, the constitution prevented him from seeking a third consecutive term as President. So he moved over to the nominally less powerful role of Prime Minister and ceded the presidency to his prot馮, Dmitri Medvedev.

    Obama saw this as an opportunity. He and Medvedev had taken office within a year of each other, and Obama had made it one of his foreign policy priorities to improve—or “reset”—troubled relations with Russia. Nuclear arms reduction was at the core of this agenda, and the two leaders pursued the talks with notable warmth and enthusiasm. From behind the scenes, however, Putin and his generals set rigid parameters for Medvedev. Even with a new president, the balance of power in Russia had never really changed.

    “I always called Medvedev Putin’s lawyer,” says Gary Samore, who was then the White House coordinator for arms control and a lead negotiator of the treaty. “It was very clear who was calling the shots.”

    As the negotiations moved ahead, Samore saw the Russians advancing two core priorities. Most of their nuclear warheads were still deployed in static, Soviet-era silos dug into the ground, and these could easily get taken out if the U.S. were ever to launch a surprise attack against Russia. “They were very vulnerable to a pre-emptive first strike,” says Samore. What Russia needed most from the New Start treaty was a chance to get rid of this vulnerability and regain nuclear parity with the U.S. “Their priority first and foremost was to limit our capabilities,” he says, “and to buy time for the Russians to go through their strategic modernization program.”

    Obama was prepared to allow that. Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. security concerns had shifted away from the threat of nuclear war with Russia. The bigger American fear was the possibility that Moscow would let some of its nukes fall into the hands of terrorists, says Ivo Daalder, who served as U.S. ambassador to NATO during negotiations on the New Start treaty. “Russia as a military security concern wasn’t really on the agenda,” Daalder says. “The focus was really on cooperation.”

    In particular, Obama needed Russia’s help on Iran, whose nuclear program the West did see as a major security threat. “So to me there was a very clear quid pro quo,” Samore says. “We very consciously and deliberately were prepared to give the Russians strategic parity in exchange for cooperation on other key issues, Iran being the most important.”

    Both sides got what they wanted. In the spring of 2011, Obama returned to Prague to sign the New Start treaty with Medvedev, and that same day, Russia agreed to support another round of Western sanctions against Iran. The pain of these sanctions proved instrumental in getting Iran to give up its nuclear weapons program four year later, perhaps Obama’s most notable foreign policy achievement.

    On paper at least, the New Start treaty also looked impressive. Both sides agreed to cut their arsenals of long-range nuclear missiles in half and to reduce the number of warheads by around three-quarters. But in practice, the New Start treaty allowed Russia to scrap many of its old silo-based missile systems while pushing ahead with a wholesale upgrade of its broader arsenal. “The treaty does not prevent you from modernizing,” says McFaul, who went on to become the U.S. ambassador in Moscow from 2011 to 2013. “In terms of parity, they felt like they needed to modernize, whereas we didn’t feel that way.”

    It will still take Russia at least until the end of this decade to complete its nuclear modernization program. But it is off to an impressive start. Moscow is building a new generation of long-range nuclear bombers, truck-mounted ballistic missiles and nuclear-armed submarines. In the past two years, Russian officials and state-run media have routinely boasted about the fruits these efforts, often under giddy headlines like this gem from the Sputnik news agency: “Rail Phantom: Russia developing invisible death trains with nukes.”


    This seems far from the spirit of Medvedev’s term as president, which ended in 2012 with Putin’s return to the Kremlin’s top post. The New Start treaty, Medvedev told me in mid-February, “was a great achievement in Russian-U.S. relations, and it was good for the international situation.” Later in our interview, he added: “It’s a shame that things began to take a different path after that.”

    In the the foreseeable future, Medvedev said, Russia would have no choice but to develop weapons like Status-6 to balance against the enormous advantage the U.S. enjoys in conventional arms. (Washington spends more than seven times as much on defense as Russia, which will have to cut its military spending this year, thanks largely to a shrinking economy.) “Isn’t that scary? Yes, it is very scary,” Medvedev told me, referring to these weapons. “If hundreds or thousands of such missiles are used in an attack, the consequences will be just as devastating” as a nuclear strike.

    This point came back to the essential paradox of Russia’s position on nuclear weapons. It is the very real feeling of weakness and vulnerability that makes Russia cling to its most destructive and dangerous arms. And until Russia’s leaders are made to believe that the U.S. does not wish them any harm, Obama’s vision of a nuclear free world will never be realized.

    Obama admitted as much at the nuclear security summit in Washington. “It is very difficult,” he said at the closing news conference, “to see huge reductions in our nuclear arsenal unless the United States and Russia, as the two largest possessors of nuclear weapons, are prepared to lead the way.” From the start of his tenure, Obama tried to take that lead, likely believing that the Cold War had, as he put it, “disappeared.”

    But his most important partners in this effort saw things differently, says Samore, his former adviser. “To some extent Obama didn’t appreciate how the level of Russian paranoia and fear of the United States continued to permeate their defense and security establishment,” he says. “For them it was so old school. He just didn’t see it.” By now, as he prepares to leave office, Obama most certainly does.

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    Default Re: President Obama seeks Russian deal to slash nuclear weapons


    Russians Violating New START Arms Treaty

    Moscow tried to deceive inspectors on missile cuts, U.S. says

    June 9, 2016
    By Bill Gertz

    U.S. nuclear arms inspectors recently discovered that Russia is violating the New START arms treaty by improperly eliminating SS-25 mobile missiles, American defense officials said.

    The violations were discovered during an on-site inspection carried out in Russia in April, said officials familiar with details of the inspection.

    During the recent visit to a Russian missile base, U.S. technicians found critical components of SS-25s—road-mobile, intercontinental ballistic missiles—had been unbolted instead of cut to permanently disable the components.

    Additionally, American inspectors were unable to verify missiles slated for elimination had been destroyed. Instead, only missile launch canisters were inspected.

    As a result, inspectors were unable to determine if the missiles were properly eliminated as required by the 2010 arms treaty, the officials said.

    Additionally, the inspectors found that Russian missile forces had improperly displayed missile components slated for destruction by failing to leave them in the open for monitoring by so-called national technical means of verification, a euphemism for spy satellites and other sensors used in monitoring arms accords.

    On-site inspectors also reported they were unable to verify that Russia had completed all New START treaty cuts to launchers declared eliminated by Russia between 2011 and 2015.

    “Russia will meet their treaty elimination goals by using empty launchers from retired and retiring missile systems,” said one official. “They’re basically cutting up launchers that don’t carry missiles anyway.”

    Disclosure of the New START treaty violations is a further setback for the Obama administration’s arms control agenda. The administration has made arms agreements with Russian aimed at cutting nuclear forces a priority. Arms talks have been suspended since Moscow militarily annexed Ukraine’s Crimea in 2014.

    Asked about the April verification problems, State Department arms verification bureau spokesman Blake Narenda declined to discuss the matter, citing treaty secrecy rules.

    “The New START treaty forbids releasing to the public data and information obtained during implementation of the treaty,” Narenda said in a statement.

    “This would include any discussion of the results of inspection activities undertaken by the United States or the Russian Federation,” he said. “However, both sides continue to implement the treaty in a businesslike manner.”

    On Capitol Hill, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry said the potential New START verification problem highlights the larger issue of the Obama administration’s poor record in pressing Russia to abide by its treaty obligations.

    “Whether it’s Russian violations of the Open Skies Treaty, the Biological and Chemical Weapons Conventions, or multiple violations of the INF treaty, this administration has proven singularly unconcerned with arms control compliance,” Thornberry told the Free Beacon.

    “Never having been made to pay a price, why wouldn’t Putin conclude that violations of the New START treaty would go unpunished as well?” he said.

    John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and a former State Department undersecretary for arms control, said the latest Russian treaty issue raises questions about whether Moscow may have helped Iran to circumvent treaties.

    “Russian denials, obstructionism, and outright deception are nothing new in their efforts to prevent effective verification of arms control treaties,” Bolton said. “And just imagine what Moscow has taught Tehran.”

    Mark Schneider, a former Pentagon strategic nuclear policymaker, said the New START arms accord has serious verification shortcomings.

    “The New START treaty is a verification disaster area and Russia has a long history of violating substantive and verification provisions of strategic arms control agreements,” said Schneider, a senior analyst at the National Institute for Public Policy.

    Schneider, former Pentagon director for strategic arms control policy, said Russia has avoided complying with its treaty commitments. “They have violated all of the major arms control treaties and will continue to do so because we impose no penalties,” he said.

    New START provisions for eliminating solid-fuel missiles like the SS-25 call for crushing the first stage rocket motor or cutting it in two equal parts.

    “If Russia has not done this, the missiles would not have been removed from accountability,” Schneider said. “The requirement for cutting, crushing, or flattening is intended to prevent the reuse of the rocket motor casings to produce new missiles. There is no other reason to violate this provision of New START, except perhaps to sell them to rogue states.”

    Schneider said the elimination procedures for New START are less stringent than under the earlier START accord that allowed inspectors to witness the elimination of all mobile ICBMs.

    “This is not the case under New START,” he said. “For solid-fuel ICBMs, including mobile ICBMs, inspectors do not have the opportunity to observe eliminations. Instead, they are allowed to view a portion of the remains from eliminations.”

    Mobile launchers under New START also are eliminated by cutting erector-launchers, leveling supports, and mountings from the mobile chassis and removing launch support equipment, including instruments.

    Also, Russia is required under the treaty to display old mobile launchers for spy satellites to verify their elimination and to permit U.S. inspectors to verify the missile destruction within 30 days.

    The Obama administration’s record for responding to arms cheating by Russia is weak. The State Department, which is in charge of monitoring treaty compliance, hid Moscow’s violation of the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty for several years to avoid upsetting its arms control agenda.

    The INF violation was finally made public in 2014 after prodding from Congress in a State Department report that said the violation involved Russia’s development of illegal ground-launched cruise missiles.

    According to the State Department web site, there have been four “Type 2” on-site inspections since February under New START. Type 2 inspections are those used for confirming missile eliminations like those used for the SS-25.

    The location of the April treaty inspection could not be learned.

    Known locations where Russia has deployed SS-25s at bases include Yoshkar-Ola, Vypolzovo, Irkutsk, and Barnaul, according to the Russian strategic nuclear forces blog.

    In February, Secretary of State John Kerry hailed the fifth anniversary of the New START treaty as a “landmark” arms control accord.

    “New START is more important now than when it went into effect. It gives us the confidence and level of oversight we need— and could not otherwise have— by allowing U.S. inspectors unprecedented access to Russian nuclear facilities,” Kerry said.

    However, Russia has voiced less enthusiasm for the treaty. Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said in April that New START will be an “end document” for U.S.-Russian arms control relations.

    Asked if New START is a final accord, Ryabkov told Interfax, “Saying ‘final’ is not fashionable today. I would say that this document will obviously become an end document because, indeed, it has an end position on this scale of coordinates, where the time scale goes to the right and the quantity scale goes upwards, in other words, it is the quantity of weapons slated for limitation.”

    The treaty calls for both Washington and Moscow to pare their nuclear arsenals to 700 deployed land-based and sea-based missiles and heavy bombers, 1,550 deployed warheads, and 800 non-deployed launchers and bombers.

    Last Saturday, Anita Friedt, principal deputy assistant secretary of state for arms control verification and compliance, gave a speech that gave no suggestion there are problems with New START verification.

    “Buttressed by this robust verification architecture, New START treaty implementation is proceeding well and both the United States and Russia are expected to meet the treaty’s central limits when they take effect in February 2018,” she said.

    However, Friedt said New START verification measures, despite their intrusiveness, “may not be sufficient for effective verification in the future.”

    The House fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill contains a provision that if passed would prohibit the Pentagon from spending any funds to implement New START until Pentagon officials reported to Congress about the treaty’s impact on critical defense capabilities.

    The provision would block funding until the defense secretary and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff assessed the treaty’s impact on U.S. rapid reload of ballistic missiles and the impact of the treaty on U.S. deterrent strategy.

    The bill also would require an assessment of the threat posed by non-treaty-limited nuclear or strategic conventional systems to the United States and American allies and of the risk posed by Russian arms violations. It would require an explanation of why continued treaty implementation is in U.S. national security interests.

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