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Thread: Diving

  1. #1
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    Default Diving

    Being more than a little claustrophobic I am curious if there are any divers on this board. The idea of spending time under water intrigues me, but I am wondering if one feels closed in while using a self contained breather.
    Of course in this area things are a little too muddy for anything visual.
    "Still waitin on the Judgement Day"

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    Senior Member samizdat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Diving

    When I was young, I dived off a very high cliff. It took a long time to get back to the surface and I got water in my nose. Diving beats jumping, though, Luke. When I jumped off the same cliff, I still got water up the butt and the other end sure smarted for a good bit of time. So basically, I'd stick to diving. Be sure not to dive at the quarry where I did. The cliff is really too high, and besides the water up your nose or butt, probably farmer Jones is still there ready to pump some salt shot, which really makes your cheeks smart. All in all, this goes to prove the inverse paraphraseof what Joe declared for the new year. Some things were bound to happen and other stuff results. And that's the darn truth.

    I've known some profesional diving instructors and a hobbie diver. I also read somewhat on this topic concerning emergency medicine. On all accounts, 100% sure- if you dive, you will be surrounded by water. After 10 feet, you will be deep in water. Your ears will hurt, and other parts, if you have just jumped off a cliff. If you get down 19 or twenty feet, then you will probably feel dizzy headache and temples bulging. This is the time to make like a minnow.

    Even if you gently plunge into the water with an o2 tank, fins and friendly instructor- you cannot speak under water. Be sure to check your bp and do depth levels slowly.
    Good basic sign language and a trusted partner are a must. One can easily black out and equipment does fail. I forget the physiology but some people cannot dive due to some nitrogen problem. At lower depths, it's a must to have a sharing signing partner. With fins and no tank you can probably rise 50 feet, maybe blacking out and make it, but it wont feel good.

    canto XXV Dante

    from purgatory, the lustful... "open your breast to the truth which follows and know that as soon as the articulations in the brain are perfected in the embryo, the first Mover turns to it, happy...."
    Shema Israel

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    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Diving

    Did it once. Never had the chance to finish my courses. I do, however, dive with a mask and snorkel.... pretty good at that, but you're somewhat limited on how long you can stay under
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Senior Member Toad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Diving

    In my former younger life I was a Dive Master and held a PADI teaching certificate. (Circa 1991 when I was single and backpacking Asia/S. Pacific) Disclaimer - I haven't dived in about 5 years.

    There is a equipment/technique/skills learning curve, but the largest learning curve of diving, is the learning curve of self control under stress. Specifically breathing control and clarity of thought under confusion. Or at least in the overwhelming majority of my students. It's a new enviroment, your perceptions change, communication is limited, when things go wrong they go wrong fast.

    Clausterphobia may be very much a problem. When under water, the pressure on your inner ear distorts your 3-D perception of body/head alignment. Standing on shore, were I to ask you to close your eyes and turn 360 degrees around in a full circle, few people have much of a problem doing this. Under water, I ask you to close your eyes and spin a full 360 full circle, very few people can actually DO this. The pressure on yout inner ear tells you you've already done it before you've done it. Likewise, your perception of "up" gets equally distorted under certain circumstances. This orientation distortion becomes even more exagerated when cave/wreck/reef wall diving and you're kicking up silt further distorting your sight and remaining ability to orient yourself visually. Breathing control and panic then become a big issue, because not only is uncontrolled breathing using air, it's affecting your buoyancy. You fight the over buoyancy, you fight body alignment, you're working harder, you're breathing more and heavier, your buoyancy and alignment is even more uncontrolled. Vicious circle. I've seen plently of underwater panic attacks from people who say they've never had a panic attack before.

    I've also had more than a few people say "All that gear makes me feel confined" or "enclosed".

    You will of course start very simple in a very controlled enviroment. The first hurdle will be flooding your facemask and clearing it while staying under. Then taking it off entirely and putting it back on. Then the instructor taking it off and dropping it. You finding it, putting it on, clearing it. Then taking all your gear off, re-gearing entirely underwater. (Diff classes may do this differently) The whole point of this is of course panic control underwater where hyperventilation suddenly has immediate consiquences that very quickly spiral out of control.

    I would encourage you to just take the beginner 101 course. It's a great learning experience in and of itself into something outside your box. By the end of the very first course and it's pool time you'll have a good idea as to if it is something for you or not. If you have any other Q's feel free to PM me.

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    Default Re: Diving

    I have been there and done that Samizdat.
    Your reply brought a chuckle from this old pond swimming, quarry diving hillbilly. Some fond memories of my misguided youth returned, thanks!

    It sounds like under the sea is no place for me. I have the upmost respect for any and all submariners out there. I remember a specific family vaction wherein my Dad let me explore a retired USN submarine. I believe it was in Galveston. Pretty cool being able to look through the periscope, but even at that age it made me nervous to be in such a small space.

    I would imagine space flight to be a similar sensation, with the exception of being weightless. As one who can't ride a merry-go-round without losing my lunch my list of new hobbies grows shorter by the day!
    "Still waitin on the Judgement Day"

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