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Thread: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    And KKK. God the left is so fucked up and they DON'T EVEN KNOW IT!!!!!!

    Jim Jones was born in a rural area of Randolph County, Indiana, near its border with Ohio,[4] to James Thurman Jones (May 31, 1887 – May 29, 1951), a World War I veteran, and Lynetta Putnam (April 16, 1902 – December 11, 1977), who believed she had given birth to a messiah.[5][6] He was of Irish and Welsh descent.[7] Jones later claimed partial Cherokee ancestry through his mother, though according to his maternal second cousin Barbara Shaffer, this is likely untrue.[7][note 1] Economic difficulties during the Great Depression necessitated that Jones' family move to nearby Lynn, Indiana, in 1934 where, he grew up in a shack without plumbing.[2][8] Jim Jones and a childhood friend both claimed that Jones' father was associated with the Ku Klux Klan.[8]


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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    'Panicky' Brits buying 25-year food survival packs ahead of possible 'Mayan apocalypse'

    London , Tue, 11 Dec 2012
    London, Dec. 11 (ANI): A possible end of the world predicted by the Mayan calendar has prompted UK customers to buy 'food survival packs' for upto 25 years.


    As fears rise that December 21, the day the Mayan calendar ends, will mark the end of the world, James Blake from Emergency Food Storage has revealed about what's on the menu when it comes to survival rations.


    Blake from Emergency Food Storage, which sells freeze dried food and survival equipment, says that he has also had British people visiting his warehouse in fear of the worst, The Telegraph reports.


    According to the paper, for his customers who believe that there will be an apocalypse in a couple of weeks time, Blake says that he recommends that they buy food packs that can last up to 25 years.


    Inside the food pack is freeze-dried "chicken korma, chili, lasagna," Blake says, adding, "there is a wide variety of food out there and it's tasty food as well," the paper said.


    Ahead of December 21, which marks the conclusion of the 5,125-year "Long Count" Mayan calendar, panic buying of food and candles has swept through China and Russia also as the fear spreads that the date will mark some form of apocalypse, the paper added. (ANI)
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    LOL!

    If it is the end of the world, why buy anything? Now is the time to consume!!!!!! HOOKERS AND BLOW FOR EVERYONE!
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    December 21: Mayan apocalypse believer camps out at French doomsday mountain

    Meet the 30-year-old plumber and Mayan apocalypse believer who has been camping below Mount Bugarach for a week, waiting for the end of the world. 4:17PM GMT 11 Dec 2012


    Sparked by rumours on the internet, dedicated believers including Ludovic Broquet hope that the peak might provide a refuge from the impending apocalypse which dedicated followers of the Mayan calendar think will come about just 4 days before Christmas.

    December 21 marks the conclusion of the 5,125-year "Long Count" Mayan calendar.

    The 30-year old Mr Brouquet, a plumber and apocalypse believer travelled from Bordeaux for the occasion. He has been camping in the mountains near the peak of Bugarach for almost a week.

    Located at an altitude of 1,230 metres (4,040 feet), near the border between France and Andorra, the Bugarach mountain is the highest peak in the Corbieres mountains.

    "I've been preparing this trip for about twelve months, I've known this for two years, and I'm here to try to find out this kind of gateway, the vortex that will maybe open up here for the day of the end of the world," said Mr Broquet.

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    One theory goes that the Pic de Bugarach is an "alien garage" and that extraterrestrials are quietly waiting in a massive cavity beneath the rock for the world to end, at which point they will leave, taking, it is hoped, a lucky few humans with them.
    But those who plan to seek refuge under the mountain could be scuppered by local gendarmes. French authorities have decided to block access to the peak and any underground pathways between December 19-23, except for the village's 200 residents.
    Regional prefect Eric Freysselinard said nearly 100 policemen and firemen will prevent access to the peak.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    ‘Mayan Apocalypse’ Started With A Bad 70s Mushroom Trip, Not Ancient Civilization

    Posted: December 10, 2012

    This might assuage your Doomsday 2012 fears before December 21 comes and goes without a hitch. One British academic says that the ancient Mayan Apocalypse prophecies are only about as ancient as the 1970s, and that they had some psychedelic help entering the zeitgeist.
    “December 21st will be just another Friday morning,” said Andrew Wilson, Assistant Head of Social Studies at the University of Derby. He says that the Mayan Apocalypse prophecy didn’t come from ancient civilization, and that the idea is hardly older than 30-40 years, give or take. Two New Age books in the 70s and 80s are to blame for our apocalyptic fears. The books detail an “upgrade” to human consciousness, predicted by a spirit from the seventh century, and that the whole thing came about from a magic mushroom trip, reports Yahoo.


    “A hippy guru called Jose Arguelles associated the date with the Mayan calendar in a book called The Mayan Factor in 1987. But it’s an obsolete form of the calendar, which had not been used since the year 1100AD.”
    “He claimed to be channelling various spirits, including the spirit of a Mayan king from the seventh century. He predicted a ‘shift in human consciousness’ – mass enlightenment.” The December 21 date appeared in a 1975 book by Terence McKenna, a writer who is also infamous for strange descriptions of “machine elves” he saw while he was tripping balls.
    “The significance of December 21, 2012 in ‘New Age’ circles emerged from the work of ‘ethnobotanist’ Terence McKenna as he travelled deep into the Amazon in the 1970s,” says Wilson. “His calculations of a ‘zero time wave’ suggested the world would go through a large change on December 21.”
    “Arguelles, who had a long-held interest in Native American spiritualties, was inspired by McKenna’s work. He popularized the date in connection with the ‘long count calendar’ of the Mayan people in his new-age circles.”
    The idea evolved, and became something of a catch-all for random apocalyptic hypotheses like the “Planet X” conspiracy and the idea that Earth will be swallowed by a black hole.
    “There is no central belief,” says Wilson, “It varies from the ideas that Earth’s magnetic poles might shift, to the idea of a ‘galactic council’ visiting Earth. There’s no one, definite idea – it mirrors the New Age beliefs from which it comes.”
    “It’s become part of a lot of religious movements. For instance, ‘The Galactic Federation of Light’ believes that ‘Planet X’ will make a close pass by the earth in 2012 – causing a deep transformation of human life on Earth.”
    “What this and other apocalyptic dates have in common across new religious movements is that they are often predicted to occur within a believer’s lifetime – making their beliefs urgent and important,” said Wilson.
    “However, most people who believe in the significance of December 21, 2012 have tempered their predictions of an apocalypse to, instead, signifying some significant change in humanity. Whether that is a change in culture or a world-wide event – most believers in an apocalypse won’t be preparing for an earthly end but looking forward to an imminent transformation.”
    “A lot of people look to this story for reassurance – about the financial climate, or even about fears of, for instance, the Large Hadron Collider.”


    “What’s been popularised is the dramatic stuff – but I am definitely still doing my Christmas shopping as normal this year.”


    Wilson’s paper, ‘From Mushrooms to the Stars,’ will be published by Ashgate in 2013, well after the world doesn’t end.


    There you go. The Mayan Apocalypse came from a giant mushroom trip.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    LOL!!!!!!

    Russians Prepare for World’s End, Buy Candles and Vodka

    Officials try to stem fears that the Mayan apocalypse will hit, while shoppers stock up on candles, vodka.


    To prepare for the approaching end of the world—a.k.a. the Mayan calendar’s doomsday on Dec. 21—Russian shoppers are clearing out the store shelves in the country’s far north and east, the first places that the apocalypse will supposedly hit. (That fateful moment is known to believers as the time when “the planet enters the Zero Stage,” a total blackout.) The end-timers are buying vodka, of course. They’re also stocking up on matches and candles, which have been going for three to four times the normal rate and have practically disappeared from stores in the cities of Chita and Krasnoyarsk. Even skeptics are stocking up on a few extra kilos of buckwheat, pasta, oatmeal, rice, and salt “for the black day.”

    Russia's Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev speaks during his interview with five major national television channels in Moscow, on December 7, 2012. (Dmitry Astakhov / AFP / Getty Images)
    Authorities, meanwhile, are trying to calm the public paranoia. Last week, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev felt the need to reject the Mayan cosmology. “I do not believe in the end of the world,” he emphasized. “At least, not this year.” And earlier this month Russia’s minister of Emergency Situations, Vladimir Puchkov, assured Russians that there was no reason to panic. He had, he promised “access to methods of monitoring what is occurring on the planet Earth” and could say with certainty that the end doesn’t appear to be nigh. But apparently, the promises of officials are not comforting to everybody. Almost one third of Russia’s population is still concerned about the dire predictions, according to a report from the social polling firm the Levada Center.




    Members of Parliament blame the media for creating a sense of panic. Last month, officials addressed a letter to the directors of all the state-run channels, asking them to cancel the end-of-world coverage. The fearmongering of such a “pseudo-scientific phenomenon” was causing real health problems for many Russians, they said. The channels ignored the deputies, and one outlet even aired a show called Apocalypse: Unfriendly Universe several times a week. The author of the letter, Mikhail Degtiarev, complained about the program on a talk show, and predicted that the media itself would cause social collapse before the end of the year. “Instead of talking about how to clear snow—which I thought would be the topic under discussion—this popular but irresponsible TV channel dedicated the show to the same insane end-of-the-world [nonsense],” he complained. “My theory is that affirmations turn to reality. I would not be surprised to see a collapse this month, just because the theme has been distorting people’s psychology so often.”

    Russian state television and the Internet have also taken to quoting a Tibetan lama—known as the “Oracle of Shambhala”—who allegedly predicted a two-week-long time of “complete darkness and silence” in an October address. State channels have also taken to airing daily shows devoted to the world’s worst disasters, and news websites are publishing helpful survival recommendations—among them, “move to a country house and make sure you have a stove, plenty of water, and firewood.” (Most people in Russia have country homes, called dachas, with underground storage for canned vegetables and fruit.) A popular website, which has a clock counting down the days, minutes, and seconds until Zero Stage, urges, “Do not wait, get prepared!” The site’s creators also provide a list of food items necessary for surviving the apocalypse.

    Moscow businessman Valentin Sveridov, 45, decided not to wait for the first signs of the apocalypse before evacuating his wife and 7-year-old son from Moscow. He read on the Internet that the capital would be the most terrifying place to stay during the inevitable natural disasters. “Rivers of blood, hundreds of rotting dead bodies, and deadly epidemics,” he explained. Sveridov suggested that the family move to the home of his childhood friend Alexander, who has a nice dacha outside of St. Petersburg. They’re going to get out of Moscow for a few days, “just in case.”

    “I do not believe in the end of the world,” Medvedev emphasized. “At least, not this year.”
    This is not the first time that the two friends have helped each other survive. During the years of post-perestroika inflation in 1993–96, when the two young entrepreneurs lost all the rubles in their savings accounts, they helped each other begin a new life. “Russians are made to survive,” Sveridov said, opening his car trunk to show off an extra can of gas stashed there. “We are used to living on the verge of apocalypse—they turn the electricity off almost every day in my home village in the far east.”

    Vodka helped back in the early days after the Soviet collapse. “Our rubles had no value, but our vodka bottles were always good to pay for everything,” Sveridov said. Come hell or high water, he’s certain of one thing: vodka will remain the true currency of Russia.

    Indeed, this is hardly the first time that Russians have been faced with the prospect of extinction. Older generations still remember the bitter cold winters in Stalin’s gulags, as well as the mass murders and the desperate hunger of the Second World War. But the apocalypse talk may be so popular these days because it appeals to a deeper search for meaning afoot among young Russians. In search of paradise, tens of thousands of Russians flock to the Indian state of Goa each year, or to ecologically friendly communities in the Altai and Ural mountains, or deep in the Siberian taiga. Meditation and yoga have become wildly popular in Moscow. And New Agers are flocking from the cities to the wilderness in search of salvation. “It takes years of spiritual work to save one’s soul,” says Yevgenia Pystina, a former doctor in Novosibirsk who moved 70 miles away from “hostile city life” with her husband and two daughters to the Land of Plenty commune on the Ob River. “Our commune is the best ark for surviving disasters,” she said.

    Still, with so many Russians refusing to treat the supposed apocalypse seriously and not stocking up on supplies, industrious entrepreneurs are springing up with special offers. Pussy Riot member Yekaterina Samutsevitch, who was recently released from jail, received a phone call not long ago with an offer for a ticket to a high-security bunker. “Somebody, who introduced himself as a member of the Last Day church, offered me one entry ticket onto an ark-bunker if I want to survive the apocalypse,” she said. She told the seller she needed to think it over, but she has no interest in hiding away. “One day, the apocalypse will come to all of us—we’re all going to die,” she reflected. “I prefer to have some fun before that happens.”

    Reporting for this article was made possible by a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    So, carry the 13 and add.... a few more billions of years maybe?

    lol

    End of the World: Is the Apocalypse Really Coming on Dec. 21?

    The Mayans may or may not have predicted the apocalypse will occur on Dec. 21 -- just less than two weeks from now. Do you buy it?

    • December 10, 2012









    Upload Photos and Videos





    Do you expect the world to end on Dec. 21, 2012?
    As the day draws near, NASA is getting in on the action. The agency created a page on its website devoted to debunking the Mayan apocalypse idea—not least because the Mayans never predicted any such thing. The date is simply the end of one time period that simply starts over.
    “Our planet has been getting along just fine for more than 4 billion years, and credible scientists worldwide know of no threat associated with 2012,” NASA wrote.
    But maybe they're just fun-haters: there are a number of parties planned for Dec. 20 or 21 this year, just in case the Earth explodes, or zombies run amok. With the "long count" calendar of the Ancient Mayans coming to an end that day, some people are a little pessimistic about any calendar continuing past that date.
    However, experts on the matter, like the NASA thing above, say we've got nothing to worry about. According to an article on nbcnews.com, "Experts estimate the system starts counting at 3114 B.C., and will have run through 13 baktuns, or 5,125 years, around Dec. 21. Experts say 13 was a significant number for the Maya, and the end of that cycle would be a milestone — but not an end."
    Some people believe the Maya may have predicted "impending astronomical disasters that would coincide with 2012, ranging from explosive storms on the surface of the sun that could knock out power grids to a galactic alignment that could trigger a reversal in Earth's magnetic field."
    But according to the article, that is not the case. In fact Mayan predictions go way past our present-day, indicating that they expected a future to come even after their long count calendar came to an end.
    So what do you think? Are we doomed? Or not so much? Let us know!
    Editor's note: This article initially ran on Cummings Patch.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Widespread panic greets purported Mayan Apocalypse


    Many believe this coming December 21 will be the end of the world
    For some, there is no need to buy Christmas presents this year. This December 21 marks the conclusion of the 5,125-year "Long Count" Mayan calendar. People the world over are stocking up on doomsday supplies as they did in the year 2000. There are reports of panic shopping in China and Russia, along with an explosion in sales of survival shelters in America.


    In the French Pyrenees, in the tiny town of Bugarach, population 179, has attempted to prevent pandemonium by banning UFO watchers and light aircraft from the flat topped mount Pic de Bugarach. According to New Age lore, the area is an 'alien garage' where extraterrestrials are waiting to abandon Earth, taking a lucky few humans with them.
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    LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - The fact that the Mayans NEVER predicted the end of the world falls on deaf ears to the frightened faithful. As such, the cause of Armageddon remains especially vague. Some predict a celestial collision between Earth and the mythical planet Nibiru, a.k.a. "Planet X."

    NASA has been aggressively seeking to dispel doomsday fears. It says there is no evidence Nibiru exists, and rumors it could be hiding behind the sun are unfounded.

    "It can't hide behind the sun forever, and we would've seen it years ago," a NASA scientist said.

    Other predictions include a crash with a comet or the annihilation of civilization by a giant solar storm.

    "We've gone from one a month to one a day," Ron Hubbard, an American manufacturer of hi-tech underground survival shelters. "I don't have an opinion on the Mayan calendar but, when astrophysicists come to me, buy my shelters and tell me to be prepared for solar flares, radiation, EMPs (electromagnetic pulses) ... I'm going underground on the 19th and coming out on the 23rd. It's just in case anybody's right."

    In the French Pyrenees, in the tiny town of Bugarach, population 179, has attempted to prevent pandemonium by banning UFO watchers and light aircraft from the flat topped mount Pic de Bugarach. According to New Age lore, the area is an "alien garage" where extraterrestrials are waiting to abandon Earth, taking a lucky few humans with them.

    In Russia, in Omutninsk, in Kirov region, people are rushing to buy kerosene and supplies after a newspaper article, supposedly written by a Tibetan monk, confirmed the end of the world.

    "I don't believe in the end of the world," Dmitry Medvedev, the Russian Prime Minister declared. Then he added, "At least, not this year."

    Even in China, which has no history of preoccupation with doomsday, a wave of paranoia about the apocalypse can be traced to the 2009 Hollywood blockbuster "2012." The film was a smash hit in China, as viewers were seduced by a plot that saw the Chinese military building arks to save humanity.

    A post on Sina Weibo, China's version of Twitter, predicted that there will be three days of darkness when the apocalypse arrives. Thusly, a wave of panic buying of candles has been reported in Sichuan province.

    "At first, we had no idea why. But then we heard someone muttering about the continuous darkness," one grocery store owner said.

    In Mexico, where the ancient Mayan civilization at onetime flourished, the end time has been seen as an opportunity. The country has organized hundreds of Maya-themed events, and tourism is expected to have doubled this year.

    While viewed by some as wacky, many are taking the hysteria very seriously.

    NASA astronomer David Morrison is among those who are not amused. "At least once a week I get a message from a young person, as young as 11, who says they are ill and/or contemplating suicide because of the coming doomsday. I think its evil for people to propagate rumors on the internet to frighten children."
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    Mayan apocalypse: Bruce Willis and Sigourney Weaver voted favourites to save us

    More than one in four respondents put their faith in Willis, who played Harry Stamper in Armageddon, and Weaver, who was Ellen Ripley in Aliens




    Armageddon out of here: What an asteroid might look like crashing into Earth
    Getty

    If the end of the world really is nigh, the British public have declared who they want to save them: Bruce Willis and Sigourney Weaver.
    The two actors were picked as the Hollywood action heroes best placed to save humanity from the brink of disaster in an online poll of 2,000 Brits.
    More than one in four respondents put their faith in Willis, who played Harry Stamper in Armageddon, and Weaver, who was Ellen Ripley in Aliens.
    The survey, carried out by OnePoll for online movie provider blinkbox, revealed that 57% of people were aware of the Mayan prophecy of the apocalypse and 13% confessed to being worried.
    An asteroid strike was the most likely cause of the end of the world, closely followed by a natural disaster and a nuclear explosion, according to the poll.
    Those surveyed also revealed where they would feel safest when the apocalypse arrives: 27% said in an underground bunker and 26% said at home, while 6% picked under a duvet.
    Asked which movie best resembled what the end of the world will look like, respondents plumped for The Day After Tomorrow, the 2004 flick in which global warming ushered in a new ice age.
    Natalie Haynes, a comedian and regular film reviewer, said: "Hollywood has been obsessed with humankind's imminent demise recently so the hype around the Mayan apocalypse reflects our current neuroses.
    "We used to fear manmade crises like nuclear war, but now it all feels beyond our control - whether it's asteroids, plagues or zombies, our imagination has gone wild and more than ever we're wondering who could save us."
    Elsewhere Paddy Power released odds for the likelihood that the Mayan prediction will be proved right.
    They are offering 5000/1 for the world to end on Dec 21 2012 and 3000/1 for the World to end on any day in 2012.
    A Paddy Power spokesperson said: "Whichever way you look at it, the Mayans were capable of some top-class Mystic Meg action.
    "Even though we're pretty sure they've over-cooked it and that there won't be an apocalypse any time this December, we do think they foresaw the horrible and devastating end of the world for Simon Cowell with Maloney getting to the X-Factor final.
    "You've got to hand it to them."
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    From China:

    Apocalypse 2012: 'Noah's Ark' Prepared For Doomsday By Lu Zhenghai Of China

    By Danny Choy | December 7, 2012 9:59 PM EST
    [Photo: rocketnews24.com]

    Remember that awesome disaster flick "2012" starring John Cusack? Inspired by the Mayan prophesy, the movie depicts the end of the world, December 21, 2012, and celebrates mankind's will to survive. In the end [SPOILER ALERT], Cusack's character and his family, a geophysicist, and the President's daughter make their way onto an enormous Chinese vessel known as an "Ark" and survive the epic destruction of Earth as we know it.
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    While the incredible special effects are certainly impressive, the movie has caused a man in China to take the Mayan apocalypse a bit too literally. Lu Zhenghai pooled his life savings to building his very own "Noah's Ark."
    Interestingly, Lu, a master ship builder, lives in northwestern China's Xinjiang Uighur. The farthest location on Earth from any ocean, Lu's home town is the most landlocked area on Earth. An interesting occupation, what drives Lu Zhenghai to believe a ship is the answer to the apocalypse when many of his fellow neighbors have never even seen a body of water in their whole lives?
    Nevermind the flawed logic - Lu Zhenghai is probably certified. A long-time enthusiast of ancient myths and legends, Lu first heard of the Mayan prophecy in 2010. Convinced of its validity, Lu set out to prepare for his survival by getting started on the ark. To date, Lu has already spent 1 million yuan, or $160,500, on building his vessel.
    While Lu's ambitions are enormous, his vessel is actually relatively small. The "Ark" is merely 69 feet long, 51 feet wide, 18 feet tall, and weighs about 140 tons. Construction is made by wood and steel materials. Later, the ship will also be furnished and stocked with food to make it through the end of days.
    While the ship may seem humble, Lu points out a party piece - the ship will receive three new diesel engines for a power output of 540 horsepower. In total, the ship is expected to cost two million yuan, or $320,000, when it's all said and done.
    "Because the homes might be consumed by flood from 2012, I spent my life savings on this ship. Using it we can all escape."
    A heavy gamble on what even Lu admits is a myth, Lu did formulate a contingency plan. In the event that the flood does not make it to Xinjiang Uighur, Lu believes he can still use the boat to help flood victims elsewhere. Finally, if there is no flood at all, he would keep the vessel as a tourist attraction or sell it as a ferry or a sightseeing boat.
    With only a couple weeks to live, we will soon find out whether Mr. Lu Zhenhai is a gullible idiot or, in fact, brilliantly prepared. To learn more about the coming Mayan apocalypse, be sure to read this special apocalypse article from our colleague at iDigital Times.
    Check out more pictures of Zhenghai's Ark below:






    [Source: RocketNews24]
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Well... if the authorities are to die on the 21st, SO ARE YOU BUGGERS!

    lol

    Access to sacred mountain refuge from Mayan Apocalypse blocked by authorities (Video)






    Medium Discusses 2012 Predictions Medium Discusses 2012 Predictions









    Pic de Bugarach, a small mountain in southwest France, is rumored to be the only spot on earth that will be saved from the Mayan Apocalypse predicted for Dec. 21, 2012, says a Latinos Post report dated Nov 27. According to doomsday theorists, the mountain will open up and reveal an alien spaceship ready to whisk humans away to safety. That is, if humans can access the mountain.


    French officials have banned access to the mountain to New Age enthusiasts, sightseers and journalists, says Daily Mail in a Nov. 19 report. Access to the small village with the same name is also being blocked in an attempt to avert disaster.






    Sacred mountain refuge from Mayan Apocalypse blocked by authorities
    Photo credit:
    ibling via Flickr




    According to Jean-Pierre Delord, mayor of the village of Bugarach, he is not concerned about the doomsday prophecies.
    "This is the 183rd end-of-the-world prophecy since antiquity. But I can't take the risk of a lot of people coming here, trying to climb the mountain and getting hurt." He told the Guardian.
    Whether Pic de Bugarach will offer refuse for those seeking to escape the Mayan Apocalypse seems unlikely, particularly in light of the fact that rumors that Mayan's predicted the end of the world by ending their calendar on Dec. 21, 2012 appears to stem from a misunderstanding.
    Although Dec. 21 ends one era in the Mayan calendar, there is no indication that they Mayan's intended it to mark the end of the world. In fact, Geoffrey Braswell, a University of California anthropologist assured the Daily Mail this simply isn't true.
    "There are many ancient Maya monuments that discuss events far into the future from now. The ancient Maya clearly believed things would happen far into the future from now." says Braswell.
    Those looking for refuge from the predicted Mayan Apocalypse should make alternate plans, as access to the alien ship at Pic de Bugarach will be closed on Dec. 21, 2012.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    hehehehehe




    The end is nigh. And delicious.





    Apocalypse LOL: 12 'Mayan Calendar' Memes for 12.21.12


    ICTMN Staff


    December 03, 2012




    What is happening on December 21? Those not suckered by the hype will enjoy a Friday like any other. Mockery of the so-called Mayan Apocalypse is becoming one of the Internet's favorite pastimes.


    Our collection of jokes starts with this one, which is not so much a joke as a useful infographic:



    Ok, Maya, Aztec... as much as these are important factual distinctions, we won't let them get in the way of a few good jokes. Like these:






























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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Duct tape? To stop runaway greenhouse effects?

    /sigh




    Apocalypse now? Canadians weigh in on Mayan calendar concept of imminent end


    By Misty Harris, Postmedia News December 7, 2012

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    Apocalypse now? Canadians weigh in on Mayan calendar concept of imminent end

    Cubans participate in a Mayan ritual at Bacuranao beach in eastern Havana. Mayan leaders are in Cuba celebrating the beginning of a new era, while others are pondering the 'end' of their ancient calendar as a possible sign of the End Time.
    Photograph by: ADALBERTO ROQUE , AFP/Getty Images

    A Canadian earth scientist confirms that the end of the world is coming. Just not in time to meet the latest doomsday deadline.

    With the termination of the Mayan calendar approaching, speculation around Dec. 21 marking Armageddon — a prediction believed by nearly one in 10 Canadians — is kicking into high gear. Even skeptics are expected to join in, with experts noting that it’s only natural to entertain the question of, ‘What if?’

    “Humans are very preoccupied with their own lifetimes,” says Robert McLeman, associate professor of environmental studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. “There’s a latent concern in everybody that maybe there’s something [threatening] out there that they should be aware of.”

    A recent Ipsos survey of 16,262 people in 21 countries found 10 per cent of global citizens agree that “the Mayan calendar, which some say ‘ends’ in 2012, marks the end of the world.” Of the roughly 1,000 Canadians polled, nine per cent held that belief.

    But if Judgment Day is imminent, there’s little sign of it in popular science.

    NASA NOT ON SIDE

    NASA has refuted all claims that the planet could meet its end, or experience any kind of “blackout,” on Dec. 21. And McLeman notes that the next asteroid that poses even a mild threat isn’t likely to be a danger until 2040, let alone in the next two weeks.

    “I don’t think the ancient Mayans knew anything more about the end of the world than we do today,” says McLeman, adding with a laugh that he’s “prepared to be wrong and face the punishment of the gods.”

    Colin Goldblatt, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, says the planet is indeed operating under a deadline. Just not the same one professed by “2012’ers.”

    ‘RUNAWAY GREENHOUSE’

    “Ultimately, the apocalypse will be something called a runaway greenhouse,” says Goldblatt. “Venus in the past is like earth in the future.”

    Evidence suggests Venus’s early history was marked by a warming effect similar to what we’re experiencing now, with temperatures eventually soaring to more than 1,000 degrees Celsius — boiling the ocean — as a result of more energy getting in than out. Goldblatt says the same thing will happen here, making earth uninhabitable, but likely not for another billion years.

    “I wouldn’t change your Christmas plans,” he says wryly.

    Bruce Beach has been preparing for End Times for decades, and boasts one of the largest privately constructed fallout shelters in North America. The 10,000-square-foot bunker, known as ‘Ark Two,’ is made from 42 school buses buried beneath earth and concrete in rural Ontario.

    ‘RECONSTRUCTIONIST’ READY

    “My expectation is that 80 per cent of current humanity will be eliminated,” says Beach, a 78-year-old “reconstructionist” who spends 14 hours a day readying for nuclear catastrophe.

    Jacqui Derbecker, a visionary from Barrie, Ont., is preparing for a turning point of a rosier sort: she sees the post-Dec. 21 world as being characterized by a return to innocence, wherein “relationships and positive vibrations” prevail. She describes it as being more like Candy Land than the Walking Dead.

    “You could call it a dismantling of old ideas and really coming back to your original self,” says Derbecker, author of Movement of Stillness. “It’s an energy change, and it’s already happening.”

    Matt Sharp, executive producer of the TV show Doomsday Preppers, says some of the most common apocalyptic concerns include pandemic, economic collapse, nuclear war, and a power-grid failure that takes major cities off-line for a year or longer. In all scenarios, the foreseen outcome is the same: a world plunged into chaos.

    PLAN ‘JUST IN CASE’

    And Sharp doesn’t think that’s altogether unlikely. He points out that epic disaster scenarios which once seemed absurd — say, New York subways being flooded by a Frankenstorm — are increasingly being proven plausible.

    “Society always frowns upon people they see as alarmist … But there are a lot worse things to do than store food, water and come up with some sort of plan ‘just in case,’” says Sharp, who notes that the survivalists once seen as punchlines are causing others to reconsider who’ll have the last laugh.

    “There’s an audience out there that watches [our show] and says, ‘These people are crazy.’ But after a few episodes, they’re at the local hardware store stocking up on duct tape.”

    Read more: http://www.canada.com/Apocalypse+Can...#ixzz2Em4LDhh0
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Chinese woman....


    Woman mortgages family home due to Doomsday fears

    Doomsday
    December 5, 2012
    By: Nannette Richford
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    Woman mortgages family home due to Doomsday fears
    Woman mortgages family home due to Doomsday fears
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    A Chinese woman recently mortgaged the family apartment in an attempt to give money to charity before the predicted end of the world, reports The People Daily Online on Dec.5. According to the report, Jiang, a retired engineer, claims she had an overwhelming desire to ”do good” before the end of the world.

    Jiang donated 2 million yuan ($321,000) to charity, but nearly bankrupted her family in the process. She reportedly mortgaged the family apartment for 1.04 million yuan, withdrew money from the family savings and borrowed money from friends.

    Jiang's husband was alerted to his wife's donations to charity when a friend called asking about a 70,000-yuan loan.

    Fortunately for Jiang, the real estate agency was willing to refund the money, minus a 20,000 yuan fee, once her husband explained the situation.

    Meanwhile, Jiang still believes the world will end on Dec. 21, 2012, says China.org.cn.

    Numerous rumors and hoaxes perpetuated by New Agers and Doomsday theorists predict the end of the world as we know it to occur on Dec. 21, 2012, the date when some believe the Mayan calendar ends and the Mayan Apocalypse begins.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    some big issues with this lawsuit....


    Mayan historian sues Indian Jones producer for using Apocalypse skull

    Sunday Dec 09, 2012






    An archaeologist in Belize is suing the makers of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, claiming it is based on a real Mayan artifact.

    Dr Jaime Awe, director of the Institute of Archaeology of Belize, claims the Central American country should get a share of the profits from the Hollywood blockbuster.
    According to The Hollyood Reporter he is suing Lucasfilm, the Walt Disney Company and Paramount Pictures for using a "likeness" of the skull.


    The suit claims there are four known Mayan crystal skulls, made from quartz, three of which are in museum in the UK, France and Washington DC.


    The fourth is said to be with the family of a 1920s adventurer called F.A. Mitchell-Hedges in Indiana, it was claimed.


    According to the lawsuit, published by The Hollywood Reporter, Dr Awe claims: "In large part because of the mythology surrounding the Mitchell-Hedges Skull, the artifact has been popularised in global media - most notably, in the 2008 Lucasfilm production Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, the Mitchell-Hedges Skull is featured as the object of treasure-hunter Indiana Jones' latest quest."


    It says the film grossed over $786 million worldwide and "utilises a replica that clearly resembles the skull-shaped block of clear quartz that is the actual artifact."
    "The film alleges that the Mitchell-Hedges Skull was found in 'Peru' and was of unspecified Native American heritage.


    "LucasFilm never sought, nor was given permission to utilise the Mitchell-Hedges Skull or its likeness in the film.
    "To date, Belize has not participated in any of the profits derived from the sale of the film or the rights thereto."

    Read more: http://india.nydailynews.com/newsart...#ixzz2Em7GTxbi
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    By Stephanie Pappas /
    Livescience.com/ December 11, 2012, 11:14 AM
    Indiana Jones crystal skull lawsuit raises questions of hoax



    An archaeologist in Belize has filed a lawsuit against the makers of the film "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull," alleging that the movie profits off references to an artifact illegally stolen from the country.
    But the item in question, a real-life crystal skull, may not be a Belizean artifact carved by the ancient Maya people at all, but rather a hoax perpetrated by a self-styled 20th-century adventurer.
    The story starts in the 1930s, when explorer Frederick A. Mitchell-Hedges claims to have found the skull somewhere in Central America. Or maybe it starts in the 1920s: That's when Mitchell-Hedges' daughter, Anna, now deceased, recalled finding the skull in the ancient Maya city of Lubaantún in Belize, though the exact date varied with the telling of the story.
    The skull is smaller than the life-size ones seen in the Indiana Jones film (which are also, spoiler alert, alien in origin). It stands about 5 inches high, 7 inches tall and 5 inches wide. The skull is made of beautifully clear polished quartz, with a lower jaw that detaches.
    Since it surfaced, the skull has been the subject of many legends. It's said to get its glassy sheen from the efforts of five generations of ancient polishers. It's also been attributed magical powers, from the ability to repel witchcraft to the ability to kill on command. [Full Coverage: The Myth of the Mayan Apocalypse]
    Some have contested the truth of the Mitchell-Hedges tale, however: Smithsonian anthropologist Jane MacLaren Walsh has examined the Mitchell-Hedges skull and finds that it was carved with high-speed, diamond-coated tools from the 20th century.
    "The Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull is not ancient; not even very old. It was probably made in Europe in the 20th century, and was not polished for five generations. It is not powerful, not scary and not at all what it purports to be," Walsh wrote in 2010 in Archaeology, the magazine of the Archaeological Institute of America.
    Walsh's investigations of Frederick and Anna Mitchell-Hedges' claims about the skull's discovery also turned up many inconsistencies, she reported. It was likely purchased from an antiquities dealer in London in 1943, Walsh wrote.
    The Maya did leave other amazing artistry behind, including a carved limestone monkey skull and elaborate painted murals.
    The lawsuit of the crystal skull

    The new lawsuit, however, takes the Mitchell-Hedges' claims as truth and argues that by removing this alleged artifact from Belize, Frederick and Anna broke the country's laws. Archaeologist Jaime Awe, the director of the Institute of Archaeology of Belize, filed the lawsuit on behalf of his country.
    "The primary goal of the litigation is to: (a) preserve and return the artifact to the people of Belize; (b) to enforce the nation's rights to the artifact and the profits derived therefrom; and (c) to make known to the global community that while a relatively small, yet vibrant and growing nation, Belize will take whatever action necessary to preserve, and prevent the exploitation of its culture and cultural artifacts/landmarks," Awe's lawyer Adam Tracy wrote in an email to LiveScience.
    "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" name-checks the skull, with Indy talking about how he and fellow archaeologist Harold Oxley were obsessed with the find. [10 Modern Tools for Indiana Jones]
    "As the epicenter of Mayan culture, combined with the fact that the known crystal skulls were pilfered from the country, Belize is of the position that the physical artifacts, together with the nomenclature tied thereto, are properties of the people of the Belize," Tracy said.
    As such, Awe is suing Paramount Pictures, Lucasfilms and Lucasfilms' new owner Disney for illegally profiting from the skull's likeness. He is also suing the Mitchell-Hedges family for the return of the skull, which is now in possession of Anna's widower, William Homann, in Indiana.
    Many mystical skulls

    The Mitchell-Hedges' skull is not the only mystical skull out there. There's a Mitchell-Hedges lookalike in the British Museum in London. (Walsh suspects that the Mitchell-Hedges' skull was a copy of the British Museum version). The Musee du Quai Branly in Paris holds another large skull, and a third is in the catalog at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. That Smithsonian skull is approximately life-size at 15 inches tall.
    Unfortunately for believers in the Central American occult, not a single one of these skulls has been found to be authentic. The British Museum skull was likely made in the 1800s, according to the museum, based on tool marks left behind from the carving. Likewise, tests carried out on the Paris skull in 2007 and 2008 found it to be a late-1800s forgery. The Smithsonian skull, which happens to be the artifact that got anthropologist Jane MacLaren Walsh interested in investigating crystal skulls, was also carved with modern jewel-cutting equipment. [9 Famous Art Forgers]
    To test the authenticity of the Mitchell-Hedges' skull, Walsh used high-powered microscopy, ultraviolet light, computerized tomography (CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A real artifact from Central America, created before the arrival of Christopher Columbus would have been carved by stone implements and abrasive sand, Walsh wrote. These tools leave marks that look rough under the microscope. But the Mitchell-Hedges' skull revealed microscopic cut marks that were unmistakably smooth and straight, the telltale signature of a metal tool augmented by diamond.
    It remains to be seen whether the skull's veracity will play a role in the Indiana Jones lawsuit.
    "The government of Belize does not believe the skull is fake," Tracy told LiveScience. "As such, I do not foresee any further testing of the artifact."
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    hahahahaha

    Evolution Call: Next!

    Submitted by Henry Paterson on December 6, 2012 – 8:38 AMNo Comment | 333 views
    What, with the upcoming Mayan Apocalypse, the soon to ensue Zombie Apocalypse, Global Climate Change, comets, asteroids, impending nuclear conflict in the middle east, the fiscal cliff…the word is out.

    Now I was going to save this one for an April Fools article, but the title item forced my hand. So get out your check books and contribute now to save one of the rarest and least known cryptids indigenous to my neck of the woods:
    About The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus
    The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. These solitary cephalopods reach an average size (measured from arm-tip to mantle-tip,) of 30-33 cm. Unlike most other cephalopods, tree octopuses are amphibious, spending only their early life and the period of their mating season in their ancestral aquatic environment. Because of the moistness of the rainforests and specialized skin adaptations, they are able to keep from becoming desiccated for prolonged periods of time, but given the chance they would prefer resting in pooled water.
    An intelligent and inquisitive being (it has the largest brain-to-body ratio for any mollusk), the tree octopus explores its arboreal world by both touch and sight. Adaptations its ancestors originally evolved in the three dimensional environment of the sea have been put to good use in the spatially complex maze of the coniferous Olympic rainforests. The challenges and richness of this environment (and the intimate way in which it interacts with it,) may account for the tree octopus’s advanced behavioral development. (Some evolutionary theorists suppose that “arboreal adaptation” is what laid the groundwork in primates for the evolution of the human mind.)
    Think I am joking?
    GO ahead, say it. I can take it. Because we are on the verge of dooming ourselves somehow on this planet and the next steps in evolution are already being taken.
    Literally.
    No joke
    From Tree Hugger.com
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Panic grips world and America buys guns as end of Mayan calendar nears

    Alaska Dispatch and GlobalPost.com staff | Dec 07, 2012

    In Russia and China, citizens are stockpiling essentials and counting down until Dec. 21, 2012, the end of the Mayan Long Count Calendar. In America, guns are reportedly flying off the shelves in preparation for the Rapture. As the Apocalypse supposedly approaches, the New York Times has reported a number of strange, fear-fueled phenomena across Russia, a population which has a "penchant for mystical thinking."
    From prisoners experiencing "collective mass psychosis" to citizens stocking up on essential supplies or building an imposing Mayan-style archway, Russia has caught a case of the end-of-the-world fever. But the government has put its foot down: Vladimir Puchkov, the country's minister of emergency situations, said Friday that he had access to “methods of monitoring what is occurring on the planet Earth,” and that was able to guarantee the world was not ending in December, according to the New York Times.
    He did admit that Russia was still privy to “blizzards, ice storms, tornadoes, floods, trouble with transportation and food supply, breakdowns in heat, electricity and water supply.”
    Ah, right. The usual panic-inducers.
    Marie McDaniel, an assistant history professor at Southern Connecticut State University who teaches courses about the Apocalypse, also argues that we're going to be sticking around for a while longer, she told the New Haven Register.

    "These ideas come up all the time ... Throughout American history, we go back to this again and again. If we can take away the end-time narrative, then many of these threats are actually solvable," McDaniel said. "We need to get to work on the real threats that beset Earth: climate change, overpopulation, world hunger, the spreading of disease.
    "That's harder than deciding that we will be saved if we have faith that God will protect us."
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    Happy Mayan Holidays: Chinese Employees Get a 'Doomsday Vacation'

    By Rachel Lu
    One company's plan to stay on its workers' good side
    Wikimedia Commons
    How terribly inconvenient it is that the world as we know it should come to an end on a weekday. December 21, 2012, the last day of the Mayan calendar on which cataclysmic change is supposed to wreak havoc on our beloved planet, is a Friday.
    There's a silver lining: If you work at Chengdu Higgses Internet Technology Company, you will be given a two-day "Doomsday vacation" on December 20 and 21. The unverified office memo, now making the rounds on Sina Weibo, China's Twitter, reminds all of the company's "comrades-in-arms" to take safety precautions like fireproofing and watching out for looters. The memo also encourages the employees to spend their "final" days with their loved ones and wished everyone a meaningful Doomsday. (A full translation is below.)
    The announcement appears to be tongue-in-cheek, providing cover for a well-meaning employer to give employees some much-needed rest. But with Weibo chatter calling up over 57 million mentions of the term "doomsday" (mo ri in Chinese), the "vacation" may also reflect a calculation that some credulous workers would not be terribly productive on the cusp of a putative apocalypse. Even if the document is a mere publicity stunt, it's a brilliant one.
    To the uncertainty about the fate of our planet, let us add another weighty question: Is the Higgses company, which specializes in mobile technology, hiring?
    Vacation Announcement To all Comrades in Arms:
    In light of the special meaning of December 21, 2012, and after careful consideration, the company has reached the following decision: [To make] 2012 "Doomsday Vacation" arrangements, with vacation days on December 20 (a Thursday) and December 21 (a Friday), for two days in total.
    We hope that during this vacation time, everyone will take the following steps:
    1. Please take measures to prevent fire and theft.
    2. You may choose to entirely shut down your cell phone for the duration of the vacation to ensure you are not bothered.
    3. As everyone is usually always busy with work, we suggest you take advantage of this "final" time to spend more time with your closest family.
    We wish everyone a meaningful "doomsday."
    Notice is hereby given.

    This post also appears at Tea Leaf Nation, an Atlantic partner site.
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    Default Re: 2012: So ends the Mayan Calendar, as does the world?

    hehehehehe

    End of the world is nigh: Apple investors cash in shares

    Ex Apple investors may be building spaceship, swat up on how to survive apocalypse by watching collection of movies on iTunes

    Karen Haslam



    Apple investors may be cashing in shares in preparation for the end of the world.


    As predicted by the Mayan calendar, the world will end in less than two weeks on 21 December 2012. As a result of the pending apocalypse, Apple's shareholders are selling their shares.


    Whether investors are using the money they cashed in to build arcs or spaceships is unclear. However, the stock sell off wiped $35bn off Apple's market value in one day last week and that is enough to build a few spaceships (according to Nasa The Space Shuttle Endeavour cost approximately $1.7 billion). Places in the spaceship would obviously only be available to Apple fans and followers.


    The 21 December 2012 is the end of a 5125-year-long cycle in the Mayan calendar. The end of the Mayan calendar is said to coincide with the sun falling into alignment with the centre of the Milky Way. Another suggestion is that a planet called Nibiru (or Planet X) is hiding behind the sun, ready to go on a collision course with the Earth.



    Possible scenarios for the end of the world can be watched on iTunes. These include:
    2012
    Independence Day
    The Day After Tomorrow
    Deep Impact
    Armageddon
    The Core
    Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World
    Suggestions of ways to escape Armageddon include heading to the small French village of Bugarach, said to be the ideal location to weather the Apocalypse. Luckily Bugarach can be found on Apple Maps, but we would advise against travelling there, or relying on Apple Maps to locate it.
    To prepare, should disaster strike, it may be worth investing in a battery pack for your iPhone and a torch app.
    Libertatem Prius!


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