Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 115

Thread: China's Growing Carrier Fleet

  1. #81
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Bet it gets sunk "accidentally" haha
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  2. #82
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished


    Chinese Navy To Build Second Aircraft Carrier

    April 23, 2013

    China will build a second, larger aircraft carrier capable of carrying more fighter jets, the official Xinhua news service reported late Tuesday, quoting a senior officer with the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy.

    The report comes after Chinese officials denied foreign media reports in September 2012 that China was building a second carrier in Shanghai.

    "China will have more than one aircraft carrier ... The next aircraft carrier we need will be larger and carry more fighters," Xinhua quoted Song Xue, deputy chief of staff of the PLA Navy, as saying at a ceremony with foreign military attaches.

    Song said foreign media reports saying the carrier was being built in Shanghai were still inaccurate but did not elaborate, according to the report.

    China currently has one aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, which was refitted from a Russian-made model. Considered by military experts to be decades behind U.S. carrier technology, it was originally intended to serve as a floating casino, but was turned to military use in the runup to a once-in-a-decade power transition in late 2012.

    China is also building up other forms of military hardware, including a stealth fighter jet believed to be capable of landing on a carrier, drone aircraft and nuclear submarines.

    China is alone among the original nuclear weapons states to be expanding its nuclear forces, according to a report by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

    Song also said the PLA Navy is building a naval aviation force for the Liaoning, and there will be at least two aviation regiments on one carrier, including fighters, reconnaissance aircraft, anti-submarine aircraft, electronic countermeasure (ECM) planes and rotary-wing aircraft, the report said.

    Chinese officials have said the Liaoning will be used primarily for training purposes.

  3. #83
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    They better hurry, Japan will kick their asses near those islands. lol
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  4. #84
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,100
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 63 Times in 58 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    The Future Chinese Carrier Force

    By: Bernard D. Cole



    A naval honor guard at the in 2012 on board the Liaoning. Xinhua News Agency Photo


    China’s acquisition of its first operational aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, has generated headlines of late. Those reports have included questions about how many additional carriers Beijing intends acquiring.

    Air power is crucial to naval power, and Chinese officers have long expressed interest in acquiring aircraft carriers. Many reports of People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) carrier construction were published during the final quarter of the last century; President Jiang Zemin may have given the Navy permission to begin carrier design in the mid-1990s.

    Aircraft carrier advocates in the PLAN began taking significant steps in 1985 with acquisition of the ex-Australian carrier, Melbourne. Next came construction of a carrier deck mock-up, complete with catapults and arresting gear, in Guangdong Province a few years later. The mock carrier flight deck presumably was used for some period of time to train would-be carrier pilots from the PLAN or the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF), but did not last long.

    PLAN interest in acquiring aircraft carriers continued; following purchase of the Melbourne, China acquired three former Soviet carriers: the Kiev, Minsk, and Varyag. Commercial companies intending to convert the ships into casinos supposedly made all three purchases, but that obviously was a subterfuge; Beijing bought Kiev and Minsk to allow naval engineers to study their construction, as was the case with Melbourne.

    Minsk and Kiev are decrepit hulks; as two of the Soviet Union’s first carriers they were inactive for several years before being sold to Chinese interests. Varyag has had a different history. Its construction began in a Ukrainian shipyard in 1985 and stopped in 1992, a year after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. The ship is equipped with arresting gear and a “ski-jump” bow, the latter to facilitate fixed-wing aircraft operations.

    Varyag was incomplete when sold to China by the Ukraine in 2000, apparently lacking engines and much other equipment. The ship arrived in China in 2003, following a two-year delay: Turkey balked at its transit of the Turkish Straits and the Dardanelles, an apparent violation of the Montreux Convention. Then followed a hazardous voyage to China under tow. At one point the ship broke free from its tugs in the Eastern Mediterranean and was almost abandoned.

    Varyag then spent nearly a decade being reconstructed in Chinese shipyards before becoming operational in 2012. Renamed Liaoning, the carrier began training pilots in the fall. Two factors may detract from Liaoning’s operational life. First is the very long time from initial construction to commissioning, including many years of sitting idle and rusting; ships under construction that long often have proved to be difficult to maintain. Second was the Soviet plan to install a pressure-fired steam propulsion engineering plant in the ship. That plant, similar to that in the Sovremenny-class cruisers that China has acquired, is trouble-prone and difficult to keep in operational trim.

    That said, however, her very long time in reconstruction may mean that China rebuilt Liaoning from the keel up, thus ameliorating previous problems. Furthermore, if Beijing does intend employing the ship solely for training aviators, then it may serve that purpose quite satisfactorily. That means, of course, that China plans to build aircraft carriers.

    China has been using the J-15 as its first carrier airplane, but has reportedly been negotiating to procure the more capable Su-33 as its carrier aircraft from Russia. Additional, indigenously built aircraft carriers are almost certainly in the PLAN’s future. While Zhang Guangqin, a senior shipbuilding official, denied in June 2005 the report that China was building an aircraft carrier in Shanghai, in October 2006 a senior officer in the PLA General Armament Department, Lieutenant-General Wang Zhiyuan, stated that “the Chinese army will study how to manufacture aircraft carriers so that we can develop our own. . . . [They] are indispensable if we want to protect our interests in the oceans.”

    A similar statement was made six months later by a senior PLAN admiral, and then by China’s defense minister, General Liang Guanglie, who reportedly stated in March 2009 that China intends to build aircraft carriers.

    Chinese press reports usually describe a 40,000–50,000-ton ship, perhaps similar to the French-built Charles de Gaulle—including possible nuclear propulsion. Liaoning displaces closer to 70,000 tons, however, and it is likely that China will build at least three carriers of approximately that size; also unanswered is whether the new Chinese flat-tops will utilize catapults, like the de Gaulle, or a ski-jump for launching aircraft.

    Three carriers theoretically will allow Beijing to maintain near-continuous operational status for at least one of its flattops. Rather than assign one to each of its three fleets, the PLAN may decide to station them in the same port, perhaps in Qingdao, with the North Sea Fleet. The PLAN is also constructing the ships to fill out an aircraft carrier battle group.

    New Fuchi-class replenishment-at-sea (RAS) ships are being constructed, but a newer, larger class of RAS ship should be anticipated. That ship will have to be capable of refueling and rearming the carrier plus at least four escorting warships, ideally more than once before reloading fuel and stores. The escorts are likely to be the new Luyang-class destroyers and Jiangkai-class frigates, several of which have already joined PLAN operating forces. Additionally, if the navy follows the U.S. model, at least one submarine would be assigned to operate in at least loose cooperation with the carrier group. The new Type-095 reportedly under construction is a likely candidate.

    Liaoning currently is more of a political statement than a naval threat, posing little operational danger to the United States, its allies in East Asia, or even to smaller regional nations. But those nations are reacting to the pending Chinese carrier fleet, primarily by modernizing or acquiring submarines. Japan, South Korea, Australia, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, and perhaps Thailand are all strengthening their ability to conduct undersea warfare. For instance, Hanoi’s purchase of six Kilo-class submarines from Russia is undoubtedly in reaction to PLAN modernization. And India is acquiring a nuclear powered submarine fleet, more out of concern for Chinese intrusions into the Indian Ocean than from fear of Pakistan, its more historic enemy.

    A future, robust Chinese aircraft carrier force is likely, then, but not assured. The PLAN, like the Indian navy—which plans for three carrier task forces—will no doubt face competition from its army and air force colleagues for defense resources, particularly if the Chinese economy slows. Acquisition of carriers is evidence of Beijing’s maritime thinking in a world in which the Taiwan issue is resolved in China’s favor, with the island coming under the mainland’s effective political control. Seaborne air power does little to enhance the PLAN’s capabilities against Taiwan, even if that regime receives U.S. naval assistance.

    Beyond Taiwan, the PLAN faces challenges in the East and South China Seas. The operational ranges involved in an East China Sea scenario do not justify PLAN aircraft carriers; those in the South China Sea do require carrier air power to ensure air cover for PLAN surface forces operating throughout that sea. If Beijing achieves its probable strategic maritime goal of gaining sea control capabilities over the three seas (Yellow, East and South China) by 2049, then next for a PLAN planner would be operations in the mid-Pacific or, more likely, in the Indian Ocean. Either theater requires seaborne air power for effective naval operations.

    In sum, the advent of Liaoning, and the likely acquisition of two-to-three additional aircraft carriers, signals Beijing’s seriousness about operating naval forces capable of operating after and beyond a Taiwan scenario, including regular deployments outside the three seas.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  5. #85
    Senior Member Toad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minot, ND
    Posts
    1,403
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    New pic of the carrier CV-16.

    Name:  S81bRwj.jpg
Views: 43
Size:  868.7 KB

  6. #86
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,980
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Why are the numbers 16 on the side of a Chinese ship? Shouldn't the numbers be in Chinese?
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  7. #87
    Senior Member Toad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minot, ND
    Posts
    1,403
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    All asian countries regularly use western-arabic numerals. China and Japan have their indiginous numerals, but are less commonly used. For anything international in use (Military) you'll rarely see them.
    Last edited by Toad; May 24th, 2013 at 17:14. Reason: numeral name correction

  8. #88
    Super Moderator and PHILanthropist Extraordinaire Phil Fiord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,496
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Is this the one that was several years ago going to be a casino according to reports? You know, the one that was an unfinished Russian one that was not going to be made mil ready according to reports.

  9. #89
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Yep. There is also the Minsk which was turned into a type of USS Intrepid setup.

  10. #90
    Super Moderator and PHILanthropist Extraordinaire Phil Fiord's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,496
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Thank you Ryan. Means we called it years ago despite news accounts and scant images.

  11. #91
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,100
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 63 Times in 58 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    China To Build Second, Larger Aircraft Carrier To Bolster Military Hardware, Says State Media

    By Amrutha Gayathri | April 24 2013 5:56 AM

    China will build a second, larger aircraft carrier capable of carrying more fighter jets, the official Xinhua news service reported on Tuesday, as part of Beijing’s efforts to build up military hardware.



    Currently, China has one aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, purchased used from Ukraine and refurbished in China. It has conducted more than 100 exercises and experiments since it was commissioned last year, according to Xinhua.

    Song Xue, deputy chief of staff of China’s People Liberation Army (PLA) Navy, announced the decision to build the second aircraft carrier on Tuesday at a ceremony to celebrate the Navy's 64th founding anniversary in Beijing.

    “The next aircraft carrier we need will be larger and carry more fighters,” he said.

    The Liaoning has a full displacement of more than 50,000 tonnes, according to Xinhua. The carrier’s original design allows it to carry about 30 fixed-wing aircrafts. Song said the Navy hoped that the next carrier could be larger to load more aircrafts.

    He added the Liaoning does not belong to any of the Navy's three fleets, but under direct command and management of the Navy's headquarters.
    China is also building up other forms of military hardware, including a stealth fighter jet believed to be capable of landing on a carrier, drone aircraft and nuclear submarines, Reuters news agency reported.

    Since the mid‐1990s, China’s military reforms have accelerated and defense spending has steadily increased, according to the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC), set up by the U.S. Congress in 2000 with the legislative mandate to monitor the national security implications of the bilateral trade and economic relationship between the U.S. and China.

    China’s process of modernizing its armed forces has involved the development of indigenously designed weapons systems, some of which underwent a process of development, procurement and deployment outpacing the estimates of the U.S. and other foreign observers, the commission said in a report published in April last year.

    The report of China’s plan to build the new aircraft carrier came after Chinese officials denied foreign media reports in September 2012 that China was building a second carrier in Shanghai.

    According to the USCC, Beijing exercises secrecy over many aspects of its military affairs, and in some instances puts forth false or misleading information. The lack of transparency in China’s military modernization has been a frequent complaint of the U.S. defense officials in recent years.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  12. #92
    Senior Member Toad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Minot, ND
    Posts
    1,403
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished

    Toad~ The Liaoning(CV-16) is now leaving on it's first open sea training mission.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ch..._132447284.htm

    QINGDAO, June 11 (Xinhua) -- China's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, has left its homeport of Qingdao in east China's Shandong Province to conduct scientific experiments and sea training, naval authorities said Tuesday.

    This was the first time for the carrier to leave its homeport to conduct training voyage since it anchored there in February, according to the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Navy.

    The Liaoning and its crew members had conducted a series of scheduled tests and training drills in the homeport during the period.

    Currently, China operates one aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, which was refitted based on an unfinished Russian-made carrier and delivered to the Navy on Sept. 25, 2012.


    Name:  F0UP63b.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  40.6 KB

  13. #93
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Report: Chinese Carrier Almost Finished


    Is This China’s SECOND Aircraft Carrier?



    August 1, 2013

    After a 14-year saga involving a bargain-bin purchase from Ukraine, painstaking renovations and much obfuscation, in the summer of 2012 China commissioned its first aircraft carrier, the second-hand Liaoning.

    Lots of people in the U.S. and its allies freaked out, although the flattop itself is of limited utility. One small carrier is really just a target for America’s warplanes and submarines.

    More worrying for China’s maritime rivals including America was Beijing’s vow to build at least two more carriers. Bigger ones. With better systems. And maybe even stealth planes to fly off them.

    Now we might have glimpsed the earliest evidence of the first of these homegrown flattops, in hazy photos from northern China’s Dalian shipyard leaked online—presumably by the legions of government-sponsored Internet users who function as Beijing’s street-level propagandists.

    The photos seems to depict one of the new carrier’s blocks — that is, a section of the hull that later will be welded to other sections to produce the entire vessel.



    What’s most compelling is the divot in the deck, identified by the red square on the photo above. That’s apparently a trench for a steam-powered airplane catapult.

    That’s a big deal because like Russia’s sole carrier, Liaoning doesn’t have a catapult, so it can launch only lightly-loaded warplanes. The Russian and Chinese Flanker carrier jets fly from their flattops with minimal fuel and weaponry, putting them at a disadvantage against American and French carrier fighters that are boosted fully loaded by their ships’ catapults.

    With this apparent evidence of a new carrier, China’s future naval plan is becoming clearer. The new flattop could carry the latest warplanes, possibly including a sea-based version of the Chinese J-31 stealth fighter prototype, unveiled last fall. The J-31 features the heavy-duty twin nose wheels that are typical of flattop-based planes.


    It’s not clear when the home-made carrier might enter service. American flattops take nearly a decade to build. China’s could take longer, especially given Liaoning’s tortured development (it was originally launched by the Soviets in 1988).

    If China aims to challenge the U.S. Navy at sea, a big fleet of carriers is a good start — although submarines would be a cheaper and more dangerous option. For now, America has a huge aviation advantage, with 10 carriers in service, powerful air wings and 100 years of flattop experience.

    But if these snapshots are any indication, China could catch up soon in the at-sea arms race.

  14. #94
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet

    Thread title change!

  15. #95
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet

    "Flat top carriers of any fleet, from any country, anywhere in the world are merely targets for US fighter planes and bombers..."

    There. Fixed it.

  16. #96
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet


    China Building Second Aircraft Carrier, Two More In The Pipeline

    January 19, 2014

    For months, rumors have been floating that China is building a second aircrafit carrier. It is not a fact. Reuters cites Chinese and Hong Kong media reports that China is building its second aircraft carrier, which is expected to take six years. While it is constructing this one, China plans to build at least two more, as it aims to have four aircraft carriers in the near future.



    As a reminder, the country's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning - a Soviet-era ship bought from Ukraine in 1998 and re-fitted in a Chinese shipyard - has long been a symbol of China's naval build-up, and recently saw its maiden voyage in the South China Sea when in a clear demonstration of naval force, it crossed through the Taiwan straits. The Liaoning successfully executed more than 100 tests, including those of its combat systems, during drills in the disputed South China Sea last month. The exercises off the coast of Hainan Island marked not only the first time China had sent a carrier into the South China Sea but the first time it had maneuvered with the kind of strike group of escort ships U.S. carriers deploy, according to regional military officers and analysts.

    However, since the Lioning was a retrofit and not China's own creation, the country's navy has been scrambling to get beyond the ridicule it can only "reverse engineer" its crowning ship. Hence the push for a second one.

    From Reuters:

    After two decades of double-digit increases in the military budget, China's admirals plan to develop a full blue-water navy capable of defending growing economic interests as well as disputed territory in the South and East China Seas.

    Successfully operating the 60,000-tonne Liaoning is the first step in what state media and some military experts believe will be the deployment of locally built carriers by 2020.

    In comments carried on Chinese news websites, Wang Min, the Communist Party boss of the northeastern province of Liaoning, where the first carrier is based, said the second carrier was being built in the port city of Dalian.

    Its construction would take about six years, and in future China would have a fleet of at least four carriers, Wang told members of the province's legislature on Saturday, the reports added.

    Dalian is the port where the existing carrier was re-fitted for use by the Chinese navy.

    Of course, the parallels to the cold war build up of nuclear weapons between the US and the USSR are quite obvious making one wonder if the same strategy is in play once more, especially when one considers that the US itself is also building three Ford-class supercarriers, the CVN-78, 79 and 80.

    Finally, as we showed before, here are leaked photos of the second aircraft carrier in construction from China Defense.





    Finally for those curious about more than just China's nascent aircraft carrier fleet, here are some additional maps from the most recent Congressional report on Chinese military developments:








  17. #97
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,100
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 63 Times in 58 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet

    China confirms to build 4 Aircraft Carriers

    January 18 2014 at 5:25 PM


    Section of aircraft carrier built last year to attract aircraft carrier contract.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The 2nd session of the 12th Liaoning Provincial Peoples Congress is now being held in Shenyang. Wang Min, Liaoning Party secretary and Chairman of the Standing Committee of the Congress disclosed in the morning group discussion today that construction of Chinas second homegrown aircraft carrier has started at Dalian Shipyard and is expected to be completed in 6 years. In the future, China will at least have 4 aircraft carriers. In addition, the shipyard is responsible for building two new-version 052D Aegis missile destroyers.

    That has been the first official disclosure ever of the construction of a China-made aircraft carrier.

    However, Wang has given no information about the carrier: whether it is conventional or nuclear powered and whether there will be catapult to help taking off.

    Chinese military expert Li Jie believes that the new aircraft carrier will be bigger than the Liaoning with a displacement of 70,000 to 90,000 tons. It will be a conventional one without catapult so that it will be easier to build.

    He believes that Chinas third aircraft carrier will be bigger to carry more aircrafts and allow the installation of a catapult.

    Another expert Du Wenlong also believes that Chinas first homegrown aircraft carrier will be a conventional one.

    Previously CSIC (China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation) said in December 2013 that it had received two super shipbuilding contracts.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Since 1985, China has acquired four retired aircraft carriers for study, the Australian HMAS Melbourne and the ex-Soviet carriers Minsk, Kiev and Varyag.


    HMAS Melbourne (Majestic-class)



    Minsk aircraft carrier (Kiev-class)


    Kiev aircraft carrier (Kiev-class)


    Liaoning aircraft carrier (Kuznetsov-class)


    Future Carrier





    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Source: news.ifeng.com Liaoning Provincial Party Secretary confirms Chinas homegrown aircraft carrier is being built in Liaoning to be completed in 6 years


    China building second aircraft carrier: Report

    AFP Jan 18, 2014, 05.41PM IST



    Tags:





    BEIJING: China has started constructing the second of four planned aircraft carriers, a top government official said according to media reports on Saturday.

    The ship is under construction in the northeastern port of Dalian and will take six years to build, the reports said quoting Wang Min, Communist Party chief for Dalian's Liaoning province.

    The country's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, was completed in September 2012 in a symbolic milestone for the country's increasingly muscular military.

    Another two are in the pipeline, according to Wang, in a projection of power that could be seen as contradicting Beijing's long-stated policy of arming itself strictly for self-defence.

    When the Liaoning went into service, Beijing and Tokyo were locked in a territorial row over the Japanese-controlled Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea which China also claims and calls the Diaoyus.

    The row continues to simmer, along with other sovereignty disputes with the Philippines and Vietnam.

    Early this month a Japanese newspaper said China was overhauling its military structure in order to strengthen its attack capability and secure air and naval superiority in the South China and East China seas.

    The Liaoning carrier conducted its maiden mission in the South China Sea in January.

    It followed an incident in December in which a US warship was forced to avoid a collision with a Chinese naval vessel, prompting Washington to accuse China of being the aggressor.



    Insider Photos of Chinese Aircraft Carrier Liaoning (Source: China.org.cn)












    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  18. #98
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet


    J-15's Buddy Centerline Refueling Store

    January 4, 2014

    Here is one potential solution to the challenge of limited takeoff weight and range of Short take-off but arrested-recovery (STOBAR) carrier borne aircraft -- Give them a “hard point mounted fuel pod with a hose-and-drogue system” (a.k.a buddy store) This arrangement allows carrier borne aircraft to increase their combat range as well as their take-off weight without the need of a dedicated tanker support.


    Judging from the following public release photos of China’s Shenyang J-15 Flying Shark, such a buddy store is available to the Chinese Naval Aviators, assuming that they have mastered the mid-air refueling techniques of course. Given the fact that the J15 is based on the Russian SU-33, the Shangyang buddy store bears resemblance to the UPAZ-1A Sakhalin centerline refueling store series currently available in the international arms market.





  19. #99
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,452
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet


    Hagel Tours China's New Aircraft Carrier

    April 7, 2014


    Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is welcomed by Sun Jianguo, Deputy Chief of General Staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army, upon his arrival Monday at Beijing International in Beijing.

    U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel got a rare tour Monday of China’s first aircraft carrier, becoming the first foreign visitor to go aboard the ship, according to Chinese leaders.

    But in a speech planned for Tuesday, Hagel will point to cyber as an example of an area where the U.S. would like the Chinese to be more transparent, said a senior U.S. official who was not authorized to talk publicly about the speech in advance of its delivery and therefore spoke only on grounds of anonymity.

    Hagel arrived in Beijing Monday after a stop in Japan, where he told reporters that China must be more open about its military buildup and better respect its neighbors — a pointed reference to Beijing’s ongoing territorial dispute with Japan and others over remote islands in the East China Sea.

    The official acknowledged that the U.S. officials recently met with Chinese leaders and shared some broad information about America’s fundamental cybersecurity policies and how the U.S. approaches the challenges in cyberspace. The Chinese, however, have so far refused to reciprocate, and have rebuffed U.S. efforts to gain more clarity on China’s cyber operations.

    U.S. intelligence and defense officials have long complained about the persistent, aggressive cyberattacks against U.S. government agencies and private corporations that emanate from China.

    And Hagel, during unusually forceful remarks on his visit to Japan, drew a direct line between Russia’s takeover of Ukraine’s Crimea region and the ongoing territorial disputes among China, Japan and others over remote islands in the East China Sea.

    Calling China a great power, he added that “with this power comes new and wider responsibilities as to how you use that power, how you employ that military power.”

    U.S. officials on Monday said the tour of China’s aircraft carrier was a good first step toward building better relations with the Chinese.

    “The secretary was very pleased with his visit today aboard the carrier Liaoning,” said Pentagon press secretary Adm. John Kirby. “He understands how significant it was for the PLA to grant his request for a tour, and he was impressed by the professionalism of the officers and crew. He hopes today’s visit is a harbinger for other opportunities to improve our military-to-military dialogue and transparency.”

    A senior official said that Hagel and a small number of his staff spent about two hours on the ship at Yuchi Naval Base. Hagel received a briefing about the carrier, and then toured its medical facilities, living quarters, flight deck, bridge, and flight control station. He also had refreshments with junior officers in the dining area.

    China spent a decade refurbishing the derelict Soviet-era carrier bought from Ukraine before commissioning it as the Liaoning in 2012. It moved to Qingdao in February 2013 and is part of a major expansion of the Chinese navy that includes sophisticated new surface ships and submarines.

    The U.S. defense official said the ship is not as fast as a U.S. aircraft carrier and doesn’t carry as many aircraft. The official also said the Chinese military leaders agreed that they still have much to learn about naval aviation, and how to operate fighter jets and other aircraft off a navy ship.

    Hagel earlier this year had asked to see the ship, and a few weeks ago the Chinese agreed.

    Early this year the Liaoning completed sea trials in the South China Sea. The official Xinhua News Agency said the carrier tested its combat system, conducted a formation practice and “attained the anticipated objectives.”

    On Dec. 5, early in the Liaoning’s trial run, one of the Chinese ships accompanying it was involved in a near collision with a U.S. Navy cruiser, the USS Cowpens, when it was operating in international waters in the South China Sea. U.S. Navy officials said the Cowpens maneuvered to avoid the collision, but it marked the two nations’ most serious sea confrontation in years.

    At the time, a Chinese media report said the U.S. ship got too close to the Liaoning.

    Hagel is on a 10-day trip to the Asia Pacific region and is scheduled to meet with senior Chinese leaders before traveling to Mongolia, then returning home.

  20. #100
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,100
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 63 Times in 58 Posts

    Default Re: China's Growing Carrier Fleet

    Companion Threads:




    Hillary: We 'Welcome China's Rise'

    7:26 PM, Jan 31, 2013 • By DANIEL HALPER


    In a farewell speech today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made clear that we, the United States, "welcome China's rise." Clinton is expected to step down from her current perch tomorrow, and John Kerry will take her place.


    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    "The Pacific is big enough for all of us," said Clinton, "and we will continue to welcome China's rise if it chooses to play a constructive role in the region. For both of us, the future of this relationship depends on our ability to engage across all these issues at once."

    Clinton continued that "That's true as well for another very complicated and important region, the Middle East and North Africa. I've talked at length recently about our strategy in this region, including in speeches at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and the Saban Forum and in my recent testimony before Congress."

    And she suggested her helm as head of the State Department has been successful. "So let me just say this: There has been progress. American soldiers have come home from Iraq. People are electing their leaders for the first time in generations, or ever, in Egypt, Tunisia and Libya. The United States and our partners built a broad coalition to stop Gadhafi from massacring his people. And a cease-fire is holding in Gaza. All good things, but not nearly enough."

    Regarding China, President Obama has said something similar in the past. "We welcome China's rise," said Obama in 2011 standing next to China president Hu Jintao at the White House, according to CBS. "I absolutely believe that China's peaceful rise is good for the world, and it's good for America."

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: December 26th, 2010, 23:00
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 17th, 2008, 04:24
  3. Menace Of The Growing Red Fleet
    By Ryan Ruck in forum China
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: September 5th, 2008, 17:10
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 11th, 2007, 22:00
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 18th, 2006, 22:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •