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Thread: Egypt is collapsing!

  1. #461
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    AJE - Military Police place barbed wire around President Mubarak's residence in Cairo

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    From Jonathan Rugman, a journalist from Channel 4

    http://twitter.com/jrug

    US Ambassador met El Baradei today. Rumour Mubarak gone to Bahrain. Still not confirmed. #jan25 #c4news #feb01 2 minutes ago via ÜberTwitter

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://twitter.com/Dima_Khatib




    1. John Kerry is the FIRST US official to ask Mubarak to step down. #egypt #jan25 half a minute ago via web
    2. John Kerry, chairman of US Senate Foreign Relations Committee called on Mubarak to step aside, make way for new political structure #jan25 1 minute ago via web
    3. I am reading a lot of rumours.. a lot of unconfirmed news. I would be very cautious at this stage #jan25 #egypt 4 minutes ago via web
    Last edited by BRVoice; February 1st, 2011 at 15:40.

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://www.jpost.com/Headlines/Article.aspx?id=206231


    Egyptian official: Mubarak will not resign
    By JPOST.COM STAFF
    02/01/2011 16:58

    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak does not intend on resigning from his position despite more than a week of protests against his rule, London-based Arabic language daily Asharq Alawsat quoted an Egyptian official as saying on Tuesday.

    The official denied reports that Mubarak appointed Intelligence chief Omar Suleiman to be Egypt's first vice president in 30 years with the eventual intention of stepping down and making him the president.

    He added that the protesters calling for Mubarak's ouster were a "minority" and do not represent the will of the Egyptian people.


    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://tweetgrid.com/search?q=%23egypt+%23jan25


    monaeltahawy: RT @monaeltahawy: My segment on #Egypt revolution with Amy Goodman on @DemocracyNow http://bit.ly/gzSCBO #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:32 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]

    almuraisy: RT @almuraisy: عااااااجل: حازم غنيم شقيق وائل غنيم موظف جوجل المفقود منذ أيام سيكون بعد دقائق على العربية.. ريتويت #Ghonim #Egypt #Jan25 #Cairo #Mubarak
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    AJArabic: RT @AJArabic: ميدان التحرير الآن و نحو ٢ مليون يتظاهرون لإسقاط النظام #jan25 #Egypt #aljazeera http://twitpic.com/3vgs0a
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    htrk: RT @ajtalk #Almahala 250,000 #Almenya 200,000 #Fayoum 150,000 #Monofeya 150,000 #Portsaid 100,000 #Arish 100,000 #Sinai 50,000 #Egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Dima_Khatib: RT @Dima_Khatib: Photos from Cairo's Tahrir Square throughout the day http://bit.ly/dYEZ2G #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    rheinzeitung: RT @rheinzeitung: #egypt: "Der Westen verhält sich beschämend", sagt Islam-Kritiker Hamed Abdel-Samad im RZ-Interview: http://ku-rz.de/abdelsamad #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:30 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    jonelmer: Mubarak's palace has been barb-wire fenced-in.. Onward dictator ghettos! #Egypt flipping the script since #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    monaeltahawy: RT @monaeltahawy: Message to #Mubarak: you've shut down practically all there is to shut down in #Egypt but you can't shut down the will for freedom. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NickKristof: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    tirebouchon: bellissime foto RT @Dima_Khatib: Photos from Cairo's Tahrir Square throughout the day http://bit.ly/dYEZ2G #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    ajtalk: RT @ajtalk: #Almahala 250,000 #Almenya 200,000 #Fayoum 150,000 #Monofeya 150,000 #Portsaid 100,000 #Arish 100,000 #Sinai 50,000 #Egypt #feb1 #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:28 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    gyonis: Protests started with less than 1% of #Egypt on the street, week later it's nearly 10%. Do the math, Mubarak, and leave while you can #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:27 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NickKristof: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:27 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NickKristof: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:26 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    amhelakos: RT @Cyberela Amazing picture! RT @mand0z: Tahrir Square right this moment: http://bit.ly/fAneeL #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:24 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    josephwillits: Syria in a better position than Egypt according to Assad http://bit.ly/hWf7N5 #Egypt #Assad # Mubarak # Syria #Jan25 #Golan #Israel
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:24 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NickKristof: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:24 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    ckaratnytsky: RT @sarahraslan: Friend in Egypt:"He is leaving TODAY.We are going to make him go. It's heavenlty here" #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:23 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    BintAlnass: #Mubarak what is going on in that old crippled brain of yours. #Egypt #Jan25 #millionmarch
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:23 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Dima_Khatib: RT @Dima_Khatib: Photos from Cairo's Tahrir Square throughout the day http://bit.ly/dYEZ2G #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:23 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NickKristof: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:21 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    guardian_world: RT @guardian_world: Young people protecting Alexandria library from looters http://t.co/Rf6lsxM #jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:21 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Dima_Khatib: RT @Dima_Khatib: Photos from Cairo's Tahrir Square throughout the day http://bit.ly/dYEZ2G #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:21 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    amnesty: RT @amnesty: If you're in Wash #DC, join us TODAY for rally at #Egypt embassy at noon! http://ow.ly/3O6oJ #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:21 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    naqvi: RT @NickKristof: When I lived in Egypt 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason for today's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:20 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    rtorres: RT @amnesty: If you're in Wash #DC, join us TODAY for rally at #Egypt embassy at noon! http://ow.ly/3O6oJ #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:19 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    AJArabic: RT @AJArabic: تصحيح : يرجى متابعة الجزيرة على نايل سات بالتردد الجديد V11355 #jan25 #Egypt #aljazeera http://twitpic.com/3vhk89
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:18 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    DanielFurrUK: RT @DanielFurrUK: Israel called the United States and European leaders, begging them to curb criticism of Mubarak #jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:18 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    jfowks: RT @acarvin: Sign in Tahrir Square: "Yes, We Can, Too" #jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:18 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Dima_Khatib: RT @Dima_Khatib: Details of John Kerry's statements: asking Mubarak to "step aside" http://politi.co/giP4l0 #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:17 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    _El_Fantasma: Llegan noticias tweeps que hay un rumor que #Mubarak se ha ido y que hay celebraciones en las calles. No confirmado. #Jan25 #egypt #egipto
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:17 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Mattison: RT @michaelscherer: Banner held aloft in Tahrir Square (in English), shown on Al Jazeera: "Yes We Can Too." #egypt #jan25 #p2 #tcot
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:16 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    ikaled: أحسس أنني كنت مخدوعا جدا حين كانوا يدمرون ثقتي باخواني ويقولون : اتفق العرب على ألا يتفقوا .. #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:16 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    marocmama: RT @NickKristof: When I lvd in Egy 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason 4 2day's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:15 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    marocmama: RT @NickKristof: When I lvd in Egy 27 yrs ago, #Egypt was wealthier than China. 1 reason 4 2day's revolution: Egypt has barely moved. #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:15 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    ajtalk: RT @ajtalk: #Almahala 250,000 #Almenya 200,000 #Fayoum 150,000 #Monofeya 150,000 #Portsaid 100,000 #Arish 100,000 #Sinai 50,000 #Egypt #feb1 #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 13:46:15 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  6. #466
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    Not gone. Not gonna resign. Not the "majority" out there huh?

    Wow.

    This is about to get a lot worse.
    Libertatem Prius!


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  7. #467
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    URGENT!!!

    Arab Newspaper (AlWatanDaily): Reports of an important speech to be delivered by President

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  8. #468
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    This is from the Twitter of Ranj Alaadin, columnist of the UK newspaper The Guardian

    http://twitter.com/RanjAlaaldin



    President Mubarak has apparently tendered his resignation according to a source. #Egypt #Jan25 #Mubarak 7 minutes ago via Twitter for iPhone

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  9. #469
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://twitter.com/jrug

    Mubarak's senior personal pilot has told #C4News he is at home and his boss hasn't left. #jan25 #feb01 #egypt 5 minutes ago via ÜberTwitter

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  10. #470
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    In fact, many confict reportings ones that he have resign other that he is not. The situation is very confuse.

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  11. #471
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://twitter.com/jrug

    V reliable source tells me US Ambassador spoke to Mubarak today - and that he said he wasn't leaving. #jan25 #feb01 #egypt #c4news 1 minute ago via ÜberTwitter

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    The Arab Dilemma: Dictators, the Dollar, and Demographics

    By John Galt
    January 31, 2011





    The American financial and mainstream media seem to be absolutely fascinated that an Arab nepotist system and oligarchy could be brought down with street riots only, as as happened in Tunisia. The problem is that the people who continue to focus on the “big picture” aspects and just assume that because oil prices are high and the citizens can be bribed that all is well behind the veil. The truth is somewhat more difficult for them to accept however as the social media has been buzzing about the internal issues which are destroying the societal structure of these nations from Morocco to Egypt, and soon to spread to the Arabian peninsula in force. For decades the receipt of our petrodollars meant unrivaled wealth for the ruling families and their ability to suppress dissent was comparably simple either through the use of brute force, religious leaders being bribed to inflame the masses in the name of Islam, or simply providing massive welfare programs which essentially paid the population to remain at home and silent. In addition to maintain order on their borders and within the Arab League, the petrol states often subsidized their neighbors to insure that the Islamic world remained united against their foes, be it Israel, Communism, or in some cases, the United States.


    I. DICTATORSHIPS GALORE




    The chart above only begins to tell the tale of wow for those “pro-democracy” loons who think that centuries of human behavior can be changed overnight because of Twitter or the invention of the Blackberry and iPhone. There is no app called “iFreedom” which installs an American style of government in the region and the hot spots which were foreign to the majority of American citizens just fourteen days ago. The hopes and aspirations of the left in our country and Europe that in some cases centuries old traditions and beliefs will fall to the wayside because of a speech and the jutting of one’s chin are smoking crack. Some nations are ready for change and will see a shift in political leadership. Others will become more repressive and slaughter the fools who think hope and change will stop a 125 mm round heading for their torso as they march and chant.


    The American leftist idealists are actually seeking not to replace the old oligarchies with a new republican or democratic form of government in these nations, but to usurp the Islamic Democracy movements and allow their original allies from the 1960′s and 1970′s to ascend to positions of power, creating a twisted Leninist-Mao Islamic Republic model as envisioned with the original Soviet Revolution of the early twentieth century. Reality hits them square in the eyes however when powerful leaders like the House of Saud express explicit support for dictatorships like those in Egypt. Thus when you hear the cries of support for usurping decades of dictatorship, remember what happened in the 1970′s when President James Earl Carter allowed staunch anti-communist allies in South Africa, Rhodesia, Southwest Africa, and Iran to twist in the wind and extend the suffering of the citizens of those nations well into the twenty-first century.


    II. Thank You Ben but the Arabs Do Not WANT Any More Dollars






    The Middle Eastern nations really do not have any desire to obtain any more dollars. In fact if anything, the desire to partner up with other nations wishing to avoid the dollar is becoming quite apparent as they intensify their trading relationships with China and India. The nation of Saudi Arabia in fact has expedited their cooperation and trade agreements with the Chinese communists as indicated in this article from Le Monde Diplomatique, China and Saud Arabia: Just Good Friends , January 2011 edition, where the highlights of the improved relations, as well as low points, are reviewed in detail. The U.S. Dollar has been on a steady decline versus the major world currencies since the first major peak in the post-recession 1980′s, and once again after 2001 when Greenspan engaged in the turbo printing policies which Bernanke continues to expand upon to this day. This is best exhibited by the Fed’s own chart of the Trade Weighted U.S. Dollar Index versus major trading currencies, the most accurate measurement of the strength of the dollar:





    The policy of degrading the U.S. dollar has created a huge problem overseas as the price of foodstuffs, despite record production levels for almost two decades now, continues to achieve annualized increases as reflected by the chart below overlaying the Trade Weighted Dollar Index against Major Currencies versus the inflation rate (cumulative, NSA) for food:





    Thus the policy of creating a more competitive America via depreciating the dollar might seem logical from the Fed standpoint, the consequences have been quite dire. Over the past forty years we have continued to increase yields and production of foodstuffs, yet the deterioration of our dollar has done nothing to improve the price of food. Since America is the leading producer of food in the world, the use of depreciated dollars being exported overseas to the Middle East and North Africa only having the same dollars losing value as they come back to purchase foodstuffs has created institutionalized food inflation overseas which only fuels the nightmare we are witnessing on television now.


    This policy of destroying the dollar has also impacted the American consumer yet few wish to admit it until they fill up their gas tanks or go grocery shopping for a family of four or more. That is best illustrated by using the same chart against the energy inflation over the same period as above:





    So much for “Quantitative Easing” helping the lower and middle class in America and the world.


    III. The Demographic Time Bomb

    The mainstream media in the United States and much of the West has finally elected to cover the chronic unemployment problems in the MENA(Middle East-North Africa) nations as the riots and protests expand on an almost daily basis. Years of repressive rule by regimes with no formal economic training nor desire to engage in anything beyond crony capitalism and Euro-Socialism has left a vast wasteland of opportunity dying in the deserts of the region, with only bribery maintaining the peace and quite in many of these countries. However when one peels the layers of the onion back, a well-educated workforce in many nations has created not just unrest, but an underemployed almost caste like system where only royal family members in the monarchies or those who achieve favor with the oligarchs can find work to match their educational skills. In the story from Arabian Business on January 18, 2011:
    Arab world needs 40m new jobs in next 20 years

    there is one key sentence which should alarm the West and especially those in Washington, D.C. who stay married to traditionalist views of the region:
    “We are all in need of economic integration, and without it we cannot sustain… with what is happening across the globe,” Rashid said, alluding to last week’s uprising in Tunisia. “Everyone is for regionalisation.”(sic)
    The problem with the Arab version of “regionalism” and creating a unified economic bloc, it would not behave like a NAFTA or European Union type of structure. The young and old all long for the glory days of empire when the Caliphates of Islam ruled from Spain to India and the center of world commerce flowed through their region while the world bowed down to the sword of Allah and the followers. Thus the demographic time bomb has a fuse which has been lit, and thus far two of the bombs have exploded in Tunisia and Egypt, with the fuse getting dangerously short in Yemen, Jordan, Algeria, and many other nations in the MENA region.


    For these regions I warn my readers, do not accept the Washington think-tank doublespeak nor the professorial nonsense some may espouse in the weeks ahead that everything will be fine and U.S. foreign policy is sound. Regardless of the outcome of the Egyptian crisis, there are more problems to come as the region experiences the onslaught of decades of self inflicted despotism antagonized further by the incompetence of the world’s central banks.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    “You Americans are so gullible.
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    outright, but we’ll keep feeding you small doses of
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    until you’ll finally wake up and find you already have communism.

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    ."
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    until you’ll
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    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  13. #473
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    Obama will go down in history as the president who lost Egypt

    The street revolts in Tunisia and Egypt show that the United States can do very little to save its friends from the wrath of
    their citizens.

    Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and U.S. President Barack Obama
    Photo by: AP

    By Aluf Benn

    Jimmy Carter will go down in American history as "the president who lost Iran," which during his term went from being a major strategic ally of the United States to being the revolutionary Islamic Republic. Barack Obama will be remembered as the president who "lost" Turkey, Lebanon and Egypt, and during whose tenure America's alliances in the Middle East crumbled.

    The superficial circumstances are similar. In both cases, a United States in financial crisis and after failed wars loses global influence under a leftist president whose good intentions are interpreted abroad as expressions of weakness. The results are reflected in the fall of regimes that were dependent on their relationship with Washington for survival, or in a change in their orientation, as with Ankara.

    America's general weakness clearly affects its friends. But unlike Carter, who preached human rights even when it hurt allies, Obama sat on the fence and exercised caution. He neither embraced despised leaders nor evangelized for political freedom, for fear of undermining stability.

    Obama began his presidency with trips to Turkey, Egypt and Saudi Arabia, and in speeches in Ankara and Cairo tried to forge new ties between the United States and the Muslim world. His message to Muslims was "I am one of you," and he backed it by quoting from the Koran. President Hosni Mubarak did not join him on the stage at Cairo University, and Obama did not mention his host. But he did not imitate his hated predecessor, President George W. Bush, with blunt calls for democracy and freedom.

    Obama apparently believed the main problem of the Middle East was the Israeli occupation, and focused his policy on demanding the suspension of construction in the settlements and on the abortive attempt to renew the peace talks. That failure led him to back off from the peace process in favor of concentrating on heading off an Israeli-Iranian war.

    Americans debated constantly the question of whether Obama cut his policy to fit the circumstances or aimed at the wrong targets. The absence of human rights issues from U.S. policy vis-a-vis Arab states drew harsh criticism; he was accused of ignoring the zeitgeist and clinging to old, rotten leaders. In the past few months many opinion pieces have appeared in the Western press asserting that the days of Mubarak's regime are numbered and calling on Obama to reach out to the opposition in Egypt. There was a sense that the U.S. foreign policy establishment was shaking off its long-term protege in Cairo, while the administration lagged behind the columnists and commentators.

    The administration faced a dilemma. One can guess that Obama himself identified with the demonstrators, not the aging dictator. But a superpower isn't the civil rights movement. If it abandons its allies the moment they flounder, who would trust it tomorrow? That's why Obama rallied to Mubarak's side until Friday, when the force of the protests bested his regime.

    The street revolts in Tunisia and Egypt showed that the United States can do very little to save its friends from the wrath of their citizens. Now Obama will come under fire for not getting close to the Egyptian opposition leaders soon enough and not demanding that Mubarak release his opponents from jail. He will be accused of not pushing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hard enough to stop the settlements and thus indirectly quell the rising tides of anger in the Muslim world. But that's a case of 20:20 hindsight. There's no guarantee that the Egyptian or Tunisian masses would have been willing to live in a repressive regime even if construction in Ariel was halted or a few opposition figures were released from jail.

    Now Obama will try to hunker down until the winds of revolt die out, and then forge ties with the new leaders in the region. It cannot be assumed that Mubarak's successors will be clones of Iran's leaders, bent on pursuing a radical anti-American policy. Perhaps they will emulate Turkey's prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who navigates among the blocs and superpowers without giving up his country's membership in NATO and its defense ties with the United States. Erdogan obtained a good deal for Turkey, which benefits from political stability and economic growth without being in anyone's pocket. It could work for Egypt, too.

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    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    “You Americans are so gullible.
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    like overripe fruit into our hands."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    After Egypt, How Will the Dominoes Fall?

    Posted by Joshua Norman 8 comments
    (Credit: CBS)


    In the 20th Century, the phrase "domino effect" brought to mind the spread of communism to vulnerable states.


    Today, a popular anti-government uprising in Tunisia has turned that phrase on its head, as protesters throughout the Middle East have begun rising up against their governments in support of more democratic reforms.


    Once Egypt's populace became inspired by events in Tunisia and rose up against the 30-year reign of President Hosni Mubarak, news and political pundits took to the airwaves, guessing who will be next. The truth is, no one can possibly know, just like no one knew that an enraged Tunisian fruit vendor from a rural town who lit himself on fire in frustration against government policies would inspire millions to take to the streets in protest of government policies and economic duress.


    Below is a list with information on the major countries in and close to the Middle East region, many of whom could be vulnerable to popular uprisings similar to those in Tunisia and Egypt.


    Special Section: Anger in the Arab World

    There are some notable states missing, especially Iraq and Afghanistan, because a continued, large-scale U.S. military presence in each of those countries presents a different and more complicated set of variables.



    Additionally, most of the smaller actors in the region - like Djibouti, Eritrea and Qatar - were left off the list due to limited information or a high-level of stability.


    Most of the country data was taken from the latest CIA World Factbook, which contains mostly 2010 estimates. News reports supplemented the rest of the information.


    Saudi Arabia

    Population - 25,731,776; Arab 90 percent, Afro-Asian 10 percent; Median Age is 25.


    Duration of Current Government - Run by King and Prime Minister Abdallah bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud since August 2005. The country has been run by the Al Saud monarchy since 1932.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Monarchy; everyday law based on Sharia law, but several secular codes have been introduced; commercial disputes handled by special committees.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $622.5 billion (world rank is 23); Per capita GDP is $24,200 (world rank is 55); unemployment rate of 10..8 percent (world rank is 119; unofficial unemployment rate of 25 percent); world's largest oil reserves.


    Political/Popular Unrest - The government held elections nationwide for the first time in 2005 for half the members of 179 municipal councils. The rest were appointed by King Abdallah. There are occasional terrorist attacks, but the monarchy is firmly in control of its populace, for now. While the government pursues economic reform and diversification, there is little talk of truly democratizing Saudi Arabia.



    After Tunisia's uprising, there was at least one copycat self-immolation, in addition to some reports of protests, but their size and affect was limited, at best.


    King Abdallah said protests in Egypt were instigated by "infiltrators," who "in the name of freedom of expression, have infiltrated into the brotherly people of Egypt, to destabilize its security. (Protesters had been) exploited to spew out their hatred in destruction . . . inciting a malicious sedition."


    Jordan

    Population - 6,407,085; Arab 98 percent, Circassian 1 percent, Armenian 1 percent; Median Age is 22.


    Duration of Current Government - Run by King Abdallah II since 1999. King Abdallah II is the son of King Hussein, who ruled from 1953 to 1999.
    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Constitutional monarchy; based on Islamic law and French codes; judicial review of legislative acts in a specially provided High Tribunal.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $33.79 billion (world rank is 103); Per capita GDP is $5,300 (world rank is 142); unemployment rate of 13 percent (world rank is 132; unofficial unemployment rate is 30 percent).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Since taking the throne, King Abdallah II has adeptly parlayed Jordan's strategic regional importance to curry favor with Arab and Western states and help consolidate his power. However, after thousands inspired by the Egypt uprising took to the streets protesting rising food prices and the current government, King Abdallah sacked his prime minister and cabinet. The difference between Egypt and Jordan, however, was the protesters in Jordan said they do not want to overthrow their king, just kick out Prime Minister Samir Rifai.


    King Abdullah promised immediate revision to the laws of Jordan after the protests, and said the task of the new government is to "undertake quick and tangible steps for real political reforms. (Economic reform is also a) necessity to provide a better life for our people, but we won't be able to attain that without real political reforms, which must increase popular participation in the decision-making. (The new government must undertake a) comprehensive assessment ... to correct the mistakes of the past."


    Syria

    Population - 22,198,110; Arab 90.3 percent, Kurds, Armenians, and other 9.7 percent; Median Age is 22.


    Duration of Current Government - Run by President Bashar al-Assad since being approved by popular referendum in July, 2000. Bashar's father, Hafiz al-Assad, had run the country since seizing power in a bloodless coup in 1970.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Republic under an authoritarian regime; Everyday law based on a combination of French and Ottoman civil law; Islamic law is used in the family court system.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $106.4 billion (world rank is 68); Per capita GDP is $4,800 (world rank is 152); unemployment rate of 8.3 percent (world rank is 95).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Clashes between Arabs and ethnic Kurds have occurred occasionally for years but are not widespread. Syria has long been accused of being directly involved (some say lethally influencing) the political unrest in Lebanon, with Iran's help. Although President Bashar and his security forces are firmly in control of the country, opposition figures have grown bolder since the Tunisian uprising. The uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt forced Bashar to officially call for reforms, some say for the first time, in order to head off mass protests. However, Bashar remains convinced that Syria is immune to similar uprisings.


    Bashar said the Middle East is beginning "a new era, but it did not start now. It started with the Iranian revolution. What is new is that it is happening inside independent countries in the Arab world. Syria is stable although it has more difficult conditions than Egypt, which enjoys financial support from the United States while Syria is under embargo by most countries of the world."


    Yemen

    Population - 23,495,361; predominantly Arab, but also some Afro-Arab, South Asians, Europeans; Median Age is 18.


    Duration of Current Government - Run by President Ali Abdallah Saleh since 1990, when Yemen officially took its current form after being divided in two since 1967.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Republic under an authoritarian regime; Everyday law based on Islamic law, Turkish law, English common law, and local tribal customary law.



    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $61.9 billion (world rank is 85); Per capita GDP is $2,600 (world rank is 174); unemployment rate of 35 percent (world rank is 185).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Regime change will be challenging for any protesters as President Saleh curries much favor among Western governments. The Tunisian uprising has sparked protests by thousands throughout this largely very poor country, forcing the government to call for dialogue with opposition leaders. Yemen is also alleged to be fertile ground for Al Qaeda, who have launched attacks on the West from within its poorly policed borders, as well as occasionally against Western targets within its borders.


    After calling for dialogue with the demonstraters, a statement from Yemen's ruling party said: "We call for stopping media propagandas and urge all political parties to work together to make the dialogue a success and arrange for the upcoming elections well, the committee added.



    Furthermore, we urge an end to protests that ignite dissent and to avoid dragging the country into conflict or sedition, as we urge to better use rights including freedom of expression."


    Israel

    Population - 7,353,985; Jewish 76.4 percent, non-Jewish 23.6 percent (mostly Arab); Median Age is 29.


    Duration of Current Government - Led by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu since 2009.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Parliamentary democracy; Everyday law is a mixture of English common law, British Mandate regulations, and in personal matters Jewish, Christian, and Muslim legal systems.



    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $217.1 billion (world rank is 51); Per capita GDP is $29,500 (world rank is 47); unemployment rate of 6.4 percent (world rank is 60).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Israel's democracy itself is relatively stable, frequently holding free and fair elections. However, Egypt, and specifically Mubarak, has been a close ally in negotiating truces and peace settlements with various Palestinian and Arab rulers. Israeli leaders fear the unrest in Egypt will most likely strengthen anti-Israeli factions in the Gaza Strip, who wage an ongoing war against Israel.


    Israeli President Shimon Peres said "we always have had and still have a great respect (for Mubarak.) I don't say everything that he did was right, but he did one thing for which all of us are thankful to him: He kept the peace in the Middle East."


    West Bank and Gaza Strip

    Population - Gaza Strip - 1,604,238; almost entirely Palestinian Arab; Median Age is 18. West Bank - 2,514,845; Palestinian Arab and other 83 percent, Jewish 17 percent; Median Age is 21.



    Duration of Current Government - The Gaza Strip has been run by the extremist Islamic group Hamas since 2007; exact leadership is unclear, but it is rumored to be heavily influenced by Syria, Iran and the Lebanon-based extremist group Hezbollah. The West Bank has been under the control of the Palestinian Authority (PA) and their president has been Mahmoud Abbas since 2007.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - The Gaza Strip's rule of law is unclear, but most likely follows some strict form of Islamic law. The West Bank is under the control of the more secular PA, which was designed to be an interim administrative authority decades ago.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $12.8 billion (world rank is 141); Per capita GDP is $2,900 (world rank is 170); unemployment rate of 16.5 percent (world rank is 157).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Since the two Palestinian territories split in 2007 after fierce fighting between Hamas and the PA, Hamas has largely focused on fighting Israel; the Egypt-Gaza border has been a huge supply route for weapons in that fight. Politically, however, there has been little turmoil in either Palestinian territory since 2007. For now, both the PA and Hamas have largely been silent about Egypt's turmoil, waiting to see which side wins. Hamas and the PA have violently disbursed demonstrations in their territories in support of Egypt's protestors. Food shortages in the Gaza Strip could make it fertile ground for popular uprisings.


    President Abbas told Mubarak in a phone call after protests began that he affirmed the Palestinian people's solidarity with the leadership and people of Egypt, expressing confidence that Egypt will overcome these delicate circumstances and restore calm and stability.


    Turkey

    Population - 77,804,122; Turkish 70-75 percent, Kurdish 18 percent, other minorities 7-12 percent; Median Age is 28
    Duration of Current Government - Led by President Abdullah Gul since 2007.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Republican parliamentary democracy; Everyday law is a civil law system derived from various European legal systems.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $958.3 billion (world rank is 17); Per capita GDP is $12,300 (world rank is 95); unemployment rate of 12.4 percent (world rank is 131).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Turkey has been beset by many periods of instability and intermittent military coups since its official inception in 1923. Much of the internal strife is over attempted Kurdish secession and the rise of hard-line Muslim groups. However, it is a largely secular, democratic government, for now. Over the past decade, it has undertaken many reforms to strengthen its democracy and economy. Egypt's unrest is unlikely to affect Turkey's government too much. Instead, it may boost Turkey's growing role as a leading international conflict negotiator.


    Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said, "For the sake of Egypt Mr. Mubarak must take the first step. He must do something to instigate change. Listen to the shouting of the people, the extremely humane demands. Without hesitation, satisfy the people's desire for change."



    Oman

    Population - 2,967,717; Mostly Arab, also some Baluchi, Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Bangladeshi, African; Median Age is 24
    Duration of Current Government - Led by Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al-Said since 1970. The sultan took power after overthrowing the restrictive rule of his father.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Monarchy; Everyday law is based on English common law and Islamic law; ultimate appeal lies with the sultan.
    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $76.5 billion (world rank is 80); Per capita GDP is $25,800 (world rank is 52); unemployment rate of 15 percent (world rank is 151).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Oman imports many foreign workers, and has experienced several bouts of unrest in recent years from them when unemployment rises. Mideast watchers said Egypt's unrest could spread to Oman. However, the sultanate has very good relations with the west, especially Britain, and usually uses firm security measures to dispel demonstrators before they can gain any real momentum.


    Libya

    Population - 6,461,454; Berber and Arab 97 percent, other 3 percent; Median Age is 24


    Duration of Current Government - Run by Col. Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi since he staged a successful coup in 1969.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Jamahiriya (a state of the masses) which, in theory, is a combination of socialism and Islamic law whereby the state is governed by the populace through local councils; in practice, it is an authoritarian state. Everyday law is based on Italian and French civil law systems and Islamic law; separate religious courts; no constitutional provision for judicial review of legislative acts.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $89 billion (world rank is 74); Per capita GDP is $13,800 (world rank is 84); unemployment rate of 30% (world rank is 181).


    Political/Popular Unrest - A recently leaked diplomatic cable claims Qaddafi has created a decadent, money-hungry family dynasty. Considering his western neighbor is Tunisia, and his eastern neighbor is Egypt, it is no wonder the Libyan leader has loudly supported the reviled rulers of those two countries. Since Qaddafi took power, there have been brief protests throughout the country, usually over the availability, or lack thereof, of services, but Qaddafi has always been quick to use his military to squash them.


    Qaddafi said he was "pained" by the protests and the fall of the Tunisian government. He claimed protesters had been led astray by WikiLeaks disclosures detailing the corruption in Ben Ali's family and his repressive regime. The leaked cables were written by "ambassadors in order to create chaos."



    Algeria

    Population - 34,586,184; Arab-Berber 99 percent, European less than 1 percent; Median Age is 27


    Duration of Current Government - Run by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika since 1999 with the backing of the military.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Republic; Everyday rule of law is socialist, based on French and Islamic law; judicial review of legislative acts is ad hoc Constitutional Council composed of various public officials including several Supreme Court justices.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $254.7 billion (world rank is 48); Per capita GDP is $7,400 (world rank is 127); unemployment rate of 9.9 percent (world rank is 110).


    Political/Popular Unrest -After a bloody, decade-long secession battle against French colonialism ended in 1962, Algeria has been marked by repeated uprisings, military interventions and fraudulent elections. Much of it has been focused around the rise of Islamic hardliners, but terrible economic conditions and political corruption also have given rise to unrest, especially right now. Additionally, the country faces a growing Islamic extremist threat in its rural regions. The uprising in Tunisia sparked public protests throughout the country against President Bouteflika, who had the constitution changed to allow him to be elected to a third five-year term in 2009, in an election many observers declared fraudulent. He is considered very unpopular among the larger, poorer population of the country.
    Morocco
    Population - 31,627,428; Arab-Berber 99.1 percent, other 0.7 percent, Jewish 0.2 percent; Median Age is 27


    Duration of Current Government - Led by King Mohammed VI since 1999. The Alaouite dynasty, to which the current Moroccan royal family belongs, established a sultanate in Morocco beginning in the 17th century.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Constitutional monarchy; Everyday law is based on Islamic law and French and Spanish civil law systems; judicial review of legislative acts in Constitutional Chamber of Supreme Court.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $153.8 billion (world rank is 58); Per capita GDP is $4,900 (world rank is 148); unemployment rate of 9.8 percent (world rank is 109).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Morocco's monarchy has a firm grip over politics and the security forces and is quick to exercise control. However, King Mohammed's cousin recently said in an interview that Morocco will probably not be spared the unrest sweeping the region because of economic conditions and the country's authoritarian rule.



    Mauritania

    Population - 3,205,060; mixed Moor/black 40 percent, Moor 30 percent, black 30 percent; Median Age is 19


    Duration of Current Government - General Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz was elected president in 2009 after his military junta deposed the previously democratically elected civilian president.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Military junta; Everyday law is a combination of Islamic law and French civil law.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $6.8 billion (world rank is 152); Per capita GDP is $2,100 (world rank is 188); unemployment rate of 30 percent (world rank is 180).


    Political/Popular Unrest - The country continues to experience ethnic tensions among its black population (Afro-Mauritanians) and white and black Moor (Arab-Berber) communities, and is having to confront a growing terrorism threat by al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). After the Tunisian uprisings, there were cases of copycat self-immolations and sporadic protests, although the junta has been quick to squash discontent.


    Lebanon

    Population - 4,125,247; Arab 95 percent, Armenian 4 percent, other 1 percent; Median Age is 29


    Duration of Current Government - Temporarily led by interim Prime Minister Saad Hariri, the Hezbollah-led opposition voted last month to have him replaced by Najib Mikati.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Republic; Everyday law is a mixture of Ottoman law, canon law, Napoleonic code, and civil law; the constitutional court reviews laws only after they have been passed.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $58.7 billion (world rank is 87); Per capita GDP is $14,200 (world rank is 83); unemployment rate NA.
    Political/Popular Unrest - The current tempestuous political dispute in Lebanon revolves around a UN tribunal investigation into the 2005 assassination of Hariri's father, Rafic Hariri, who was prime minister at the time. Many expect the tribunal to blame Hezbollah (defined by most Western countries as a terrorist group,) so Hezbollah has been seeking to politically delegitimize the tribunal by installing politicians who will reject it.



    There are persistent rumors of Syria's and Iran's support of Hezbollah, and international observers blame both for fomenting the Lebanon's turmoil to their benefit. Additionally, the country has not fully recovered, emotionally or otherwise, from a brutal 15-year civil war that ended in 1990. Take the political disputes and combine them with tough economic conditions, and Lebanon is fertile ground for continual civil unrest into the near future.


    Iran

    Population - 76,923,300; Persian 51 percent, Azeri 24 percent, Gilaki and Mazandarani 8 percent, Kurd 7 percent, Arab 3 percent, Lur 2 percent, Baloch 2 percent, Turkmen 2 percent, other 1 percent; Median Age is 26
    Duration of Current Government - Although the government has technically been led by democratically elected President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad since 2005, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has been controlling state policy since 1989. He is elected by and answerable only to the Assembly of Experts, a deliberative body of 86 Islamic scholars.
    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Theocratic republic; Everyday law is based on the Sharia law system.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $863.5 billion (world rank is 19); Per capita GDP is $11,200 (world rank is 100); unemployment rate 14.6 percent (world rank is 146).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Hundreds of thousands of Iranians took to the streets in summer of 2009 amid allegations of voter fraud to protest the reelection of conservative President Ahmadinejad. The demonstrations were violently stamped out by Iranian government forces, who also conducted mass arrests, the suspension of Internet and phone service and broad intimidation. Although calm recently, several news reports indicate opposition leaders are gathering and planning more protests after being inspired by the upheaval in Tunisia and Egypt.


    However, Iran's hard-line rulers have tried to take credit for the uprisings, calling them a replay of the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Ayatollah Ahmad Khatami said in a recent prayer sermon: "A new Middle East is emerging based on Islam ... based on religious democracy." Khatami added that Chants of "Allahu Akbar," or "God is Great," from protesters signal a new Middle East based on Islamic values, not U.S. goals, is emerging.


    Sudan

    Population - 43,939,598; black 52 percent, Arab 39 percent, Beja 6 percent, foreigners 2 percent, other 1 percent; Median Age is 18
    Duration of Current Government - President Omar al-Bashir was eventually installed as president after helping lead a military coup in 1989.



    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Government of National Unity (the National Congress Party and Sudan People's Liberation Movement formed a power-sharing government under the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement after a bloody civil war; the NCP, which came to power by military coup in 1989, was the majority partner; as part of the CPA, South Sudan voted recently to secede from the north; the division process is underway); Everyday law in the north is based on Sharia law, although there is some protection for non-Muslims living in the capital, Khartoum.
    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $98.8 billion (world rank is 71); Per capita GDP is $2,200 (world rank is 187); unemployment rate 18.7 percent (world rank is 163).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Although the recent secession vote in South Sudan was peaceful, the Bashir government is allegedly still supporting violence against residents of the disputed Darfur region in the west.



    Additionally, the unrest in Tunisia and Egypt also recently inspired anti-government protestors in Khartoum, albeit in much smaller numbers. They were quickly beaten back by state security forces.


    Pakistan

    Population - 184,404,791; Punjabi 44.68 percent, Pashtun (Pathan) 15.42 percent, Sindhi 14.1 percent, Sariaki 8.38 percent, Muhajirs 7.57 percent, Balochi 3.57 percent, other 6.28 percent; Median Age is 21
    Duration of Current Government - Asif Ali Zardari was elected president in parliamentary elections in 2008.


    Constitution and the Rule of Law - Federal republic; Everyday law in the north is based on English common law with provisions to accommodate Pakistan's status as an Islamic state.


    Economic Indicators - Overall GDP is $451.2 billion (world rank is 28); Per capita GDP is $2,400 (world rank is 182); unemployment rate 15 percent (world rank is 150).


    Political/Popular Unrest - Never mind that a large swath of the northwest of the country is out of the control of the central government, Islamic hard liners consistently spring attacks on the public, government officials and security forces. Most alarming, however, were last year's devastating floods that left 11 million homeless. The Red Cross recently warned that food shortages caused by the floods could lead to revolts similar to what happened in Tunisia.
    Libertatem Prius!


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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://twitter.com/jrug

    Seems like Mubarak got the "leave" memo and didn't like it. Egypt on the brink of who know's what #c4news #jan25 #feb01 10 minutes ago via ÜberTwitter

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://tweetgrid.com/search?q=%23egypt+%23jan25


    RiverDryFilm: If you haven't already, go to www.occupiedcairo.org for as much info as can be got out of here. #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:12 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]

    davidcdagley: RT @davidcdagley: Suu Kyi tells #Egypt protesters: 'We're all with you" http://ow.ly/3O98u #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:12 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    fieldproducer: RT @fieldproducer: Reuters snap on the Mubarak statement is based on reports by Al Arabiya television #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:11 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    people11revolt: The crimes #Mubarak & his cabinet has ordered (particularly against the the people of Suez) will come to light! #Egypt #Jan28 #Jan25 #Feb1
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:11 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    stanleyburburin: This DSL is still working in Egypt using dial up 0777 7776 or 07777 666. Share with everyone asap. #Broadcast #Egypt #jan25 #egypte
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:10 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    7oukaz: RT @RamyYaacoub: #OnPhoneW/ @SandMonkey: " @Ghonim is definitely still missing, no one can reach him" #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:10 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Esperanza82: RT @Esperanza82: #Egypt #REVOLUTION announces Feb 4th as the Friday of Departure! #Jan25 #Feb1 #SOLIDARITY
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:09 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    drsolaiman: كلٌ خط قلمه في خضم هذه الأحداث ،، لكن أيها كان يتنفس حبراً صادقاً ؟! #cairo #jan25 #Egypt #tahreer #jan28
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:09 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    emilylhauser: Post for the non-MidEast geek: Just some of the reasons that #Egypt 2011 isn't #Iran 2009 http://bit.ly/fookh9 #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:09 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    redostoneage: #Cairo Million Man March Underway in Tahrir square– Female Protesters Seen… Off to the Side http://is.gd/6MQGfM #egypt #jan25 #tcot #tlot
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:08 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    stanleyburburin: RT @stanleyburburin: #egypt #jan25 How to open any blocked website using Tor- http://youtu.be/RAI1Ic9-VAw / طريقة فتح المواقع المحجوبة
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:07 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    SuadHani: RT @SuadHani: #Google + #Twitter, thank you for making #tweeterspeak available to Egyptians <3 #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:06 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Muhanadalnidawi: Someone somewhere is saying there r reports on a speech for #Mubarak later tonight. will see ! #Egypt #jan25 #cairo #Tahrir @NickKristof
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:05 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Ann0ula: Oh look, more flotilla-esque propaganda from Israeli twitter spies #jan25 #egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:04 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    mynurealtor: rt @abeerallamft: Egypt wants change, not revenge #jan25 #egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:04 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    GlobalFundWomen: RT @monaeltahawy Women and #Egypt revolution: Equal Rights Takes to the Barricades - http://nyti.ms/ewmpH8 #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:03 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Khaledtron: RT @Khaledtron: This is #Epic, Fox News has no idea where Egypt is on a map: http://plixi.com/p/73294801 #jan25 #egypt #USA (via @cheeseycelt)
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:03 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    sokkari: الغندور على دريم لذيذ خالص معاه شاب تاني بيقول: انا كنت معارض علشان مافيش اختيارات لمدة ٣٠ سنة.دلوقتي فيه اختيارات #Egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:02 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    alarabiya_ar: RT @alarabiya_ar: انباء عن كلمة لمبارك اليوم #alarabiya #egypt #cairo #jan25 #FREEEGYPT #Internet #25jan
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:01 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    icicKAIROUAN: http://j.mp/i1aTp0%0A #egypt #Jan25 #aljazeera #change شكرا يا مصر @Dima_Khatib @AliAldafiri @alhiwarchannel @AJArabic @AzzamTamimi
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:29:00 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    NohaAtef: AJE: Locals r handing in food, water & blankets to protesters in Tahrir, you can hear a music in the background!! #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:28:59 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    dfnssr: RT @NicRobertsonCNN: Ask ppl how long demos can go if start running of food etc? Reply we've suffered such things before, this time we have a goal #egypt #jan25

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  17. #477
    Senior Member BRVoice's Avatar
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    http://tweetgrid.com/search?q=%23egypt+%23jan25


    ajtalk: RT @ajtalk: مراسل التوك: عمرو واكد:اشارك في المظاهرات منذ يوم الثلاثاءوآن آوان التغيير يجب ان يرحل النظام يكفي ثلاثين عاما من الفساد #jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:46 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]

    alarabiya_ar: RT @alarabiya_ar: انباء عن اعلان مبارك الليلة نيته عدم الترشح لولاية جديدة #alarabiya #egypt #cairo #jan25 #FREEEGYPT #Internet #25jan
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:46 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    theatlantic: RT @theatlantic: Video: “Your police are taking off their jackets and joining the people.” http://tumblr.com/xed1egp7aj #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:45 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    nejer: RT @nejer: نظام مبارك كان يدعم رجال أعمال مصريين في تصدير الأسمنت ومساعدة إسرائيل في بناء الجدار الفاصل #Egypt #Jan25 #25Jan
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:44 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    homovidens: Speak-to-tweet service – the ability for anyone to tweet using just a voice connection http://ow.ly/3OhyT #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:43 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    two_eggs: حصني مبارك بيسوي اكشن زي هذيك الكلمة.. بيعرضون اللقاء الساعة ثنتين الليل .. بروح ادور لي بوب كورن عشان اتابع الكلمة الاخيرة له #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:43 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    itsweezie: RT @RamyYaacoub: RT @mand0z: Al Arabeya says Omar Suleiman commenced meetings with representatives from opposition parties. #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:43 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    EDSETIADI: RT @EDSETIADI: "Egyptian Christians said they will guard the Muslims from the police while they on Friday Pray." Amazing solidarity. #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:42 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    fatalin: http://me.lt/315UX My interview with @Sandmonkey for #RFE/RL #Egypt #Jan25 #Jan28
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:42 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    kuuma_san: RT @kuuma_san: これは良い画像。ネット住民に是非見てほしい I love this one! #jan25 #egypt #tahrir (not today tho) on Twitpic http://t.co/T4RNICO via @AddThis #egyjp
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:42 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    amnesty: RT @amnesty: PHOTO: Amnesty rally going on right now at #Egypt embassy in #DC: http://twitpic.com/3vihyc #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:41 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    sunshineejc: Jordan’s King Dismisses Cabinet as Tremors Spread Through Region - http://nyti.ms/hL7qrA ...#egypt #jan25 #p2 #p21 #sgp #tlot #tcot
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:41 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    bahrainboard: المصريون عارضو التوريث واحنا مكتوب علينا التوريث المصريون ثارواعلى تزويرإنتخابات النواب وبرلماننا قائم على توزيع باطل #jan25 #Egypt #Bahrain
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:38 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    hemara: LOL - joke circulating Tahrir Sq/ recounted on #AJE: Mubarak is having #Egypt Air prepare jets to take the Egyptian people to KSA || #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:37 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    jeroenpraat: "Egyptian Revolution - The World Calls for Peace" #Egypt #peace #jan25 #revolution #egypte #video
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:37 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    icelos: RT @amnesty Interviews w/ protesters and our researcher in Cairo http://ow.ly/3OeMm #Egypt #Jan25 #cdnpoli
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:36 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    erinschrode: Turkish PM backs #Egypt protesters: Erdogan urges President #Mubarak to "lend an ear to the people'...@AJEnglish http://aje.me/hXUedh #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:36 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    pdacosta: RT @pdacosta: Jordan's king appoints new PM after protests http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7103G720110201 #Egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:34 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    HabibElAdly: I've made some mistakes in the past, chief amongst them not asking #Mubarak to institute some sort of profit sharing. #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:33 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    paguitoportal: RT @paguitoportal: RT @Milenio: El Baradei reclama que Mubarak deje el poder antes del viernes #Egypt #Jan25 http://mile.io/flt4A9
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    bencnn: RT @bencnn: How would Americans feel if #Obama shut down internet, cell phones, banks, trains, schools, etc.? Think about that. #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:31 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    anan_ibrahim: BREAKING Al Arabiya: Mubarak will announce tonight his intent not to re-enter the elections" #Jan25 #egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:30 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    Sara_Abdul_aziz: مبارك بيطلع بعد ما يحرق قلب كل شعب مصر - الله يكون بعونهم ويقوّيهم وينصرهم #egypt #cairo #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:30 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    nrc: Mubarak zal vandaag al een speech geven, is het laatste bericht. #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    pvdp: Mubarak zal vandaag al een speech geven, is het laatste bericht. #Egypt #Jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:29 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    jrug: RT @jrug: V reliable source tells me US Ambassador spoke to Mubarak today - and that he said he wasn't leaving. #jan25 #feb01 #egypt #c4news
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:28 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    YanniKouts: Let us not be over-optimistic re Mubarak speech. Not clear yet if he'll step down. | #Jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:28 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    SherineT: RT @SherineT: still no internet. tweeting via a friend! #egypt #jan25
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:27 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]


    khazelton: v @MacJordaN: This may be 1 of best pictures from #Egypt http://twitpic.http://twitpic.com/3v4jdsHeatherLaGarde & @KatieS ) #jan25 #Egypt
    terça-feira, 1 de fevereiro de 2011 16:30:27 [Reply] [ReTweet] [Favorite]



    majohnson111: RT @bbclysedoucet: @BBCWorld #Jordan ex dep PM says King has removed those ''resisting reform.'' But how far is King willing to go? #Egypt #jan25

    Saint Paul in the Ephesians 6:12


    "For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



  18. #478
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    Analysis - Syrians silently gripped by Arab upheaval


    Related News












    Syrian and Palestinian activists hold candles during a candlelight in support of the protests in Egypt in front of the Egyptian embassy in Damascus January 29, 2011.
    Credit: Reuters/Khaled al-Hariri






    By Khaled Yacoub Oweis


    DAMASCUS | Sun Jan 30, 2011 8:17am EST



    DAMASCUS (Reuters) - On the surface all is calm in Syria, tightly ruled by the same authoritarian party for half a century, despite the upheaval in several of its Arab neighbours. Below, ordinary Syrians are quietly captivated by the tumult.


    The government has barely commented on the six days of unprecedented protests against Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, and its control over the media has stifled public reaction in a country struggling with similar poverty and unemployment.


    "People are afraid to express an opinion, but between themselves they're saying:

    'Mubarak be damned'," said a man waiting for a haircut at a Damascus barber.


    "What are the authorities waiting for? Are they waiting for instability to hit Syria before they act? Open the country up," another man said.


    But there is no sign that the upheaval in Egypt will spark reform in Syria. Syria's ruling hierarchy has moved swiftly to neutralise dissent since Tunisia's uprising earlier this month which overthrew strongman Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali and inspired Egyptian protests against Mubarak's 30-year rule.


    The government raised a key fuel subsidy and tightened Internet controls, while a special security court jailed a 69-year-old leftist for seven years this month for discussing alternatives to the Baath Party's monopoly on power.


    Although Syria and Egypt have been at odds politically, backing different Palestinian and Lebanese factions, the two countries are ruled through emergency law and suffer an acute gap between rich and poor, widespread corruption and 10 percent unemployment estimated independently at least double that.


    CRISIS IN THE EAST


    They have similar Gross Domestic Product per capita at around $2,500 (£1,575.50) and two great rivers -- Egypt the Nile and Syria the Euphrates. But water mismanagement has turned Syria's eastern region that borders Iraq and Turkey into a dustbowl.


    The water crisis in the east, Syria's agricultural heartland, has displaced hundreds of thousands of people over the past five years. Violent demonstrations by the ethnic Kurdish minority swept the east in 2004, resulting in scores of deaths.


    A United Nations report last year said 800,000 people in the region were severely affected by lack of water and living in extreme poverty and "should be benefiting from much higher level of support than is now provided by the Syrian government."


    In a stark reminder of Syria's wealth gap, the region produces all of the country's output of 380,000 barrels of oil per day, down from a peak of 590,000 bpd in 2006.
    "You have a lot of discontent, and many people of the east have found themselves dispossessed refugees and are now around major Syrian cities," an unemployed Syrian engineer said.


    A lawyer educated in Europe said the upheaval in Tunisia and Egypt shows that corruption is a difficult habit to stop, although "the billions of dollars officials and their cronies amass will not help them one single iota when their end comes."


    "Stop the corruption. Stop the thefts. When is enough enough? There seems never to be a limit," he said.


    But change is not favoured by all, with ordinary Syrians living in a complex society of myriad sects and ethnicities. Members of the professional class worry that shattering the current system could result in mob rule, due to low education standards and the erosion of the middle class in recent decades.


    "At least we know who is ruling Syria now. If change comes it may not be the middle classes and people with Facebook accounts leading it," a Syrian doctor with a practice in an upscale area of Damascus said.


    "Our rulers have to rebuild the education system and clean up the judiciary, fast," he said. "Syria is running out of time."
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    Sudanese police clash with students in Khartoum

    By Khaled Abdelaziz

    KHARTOUM | Sun Jan 30, 2011 11:12am EST

    KHARTOUM (Reuters) - Sudanese police beat and arrested students on Sunday as hundreds protested throughout the capital demanding the government resign, inspired by a popular uprising in neighbouring Egypt.

    Armed riot police broke up groups of young Sudanese demonstrating in central Khartoum and surrounded the entrances of four universities in the capital, firing teargas and beating students at three of them.

    Some 500 young people also protested in the city of el-Obeid in North Kordofan in the west of the country.

    Police beat students with batons as they chanted anti-government slogans such as "we are ready to die for Sudan" and "revolution, revolution until victory."

    Groups have emerged on social networking sites calling themselves "Youth for Change" and "The Spark," since the uprisings in nearby Tunisia and close ally Egypt this month.

    "Youth for Change" has attracted more than 15,000 members.

    "The people of Sudan will not remain silent any more," its Facebook page said. "It is about time we demand our rights and take what's ours in a peaceful demonstration that will not involve any acts of sabotage."

    The pro-democracy group Girifna ("We're fed up") said nine members were detained the night before the protest and opposition party officials listed almost 40 names of protesters arrested on Sunday. Five were injured, they added.

    Sudan has a close affinity with Egypt -- the two countries were united under British colonial rule. The unprecedented scenes there inspired calls for similar action in Sudan, where protests without permission, which is rarely given, are illegal.

    Before Tunisia's popular revolt, Sudan was the last Arab country to overthrow a leader with popular protests, ousting Jaafar Nimeiri in 1985.

    Opposition leader Mubarak al-Fadil told Reuters two of his sons were arrested on their way to the central protest.

    Editor-in-chief of the al-Wan daily paper Hussein Khogali said his daughter had been detained by security forces since 8 a.m. (1 a.m. EST) accused of organising the Facebook-led protest.

    PROTESTS IN WEST

    Around 500 protestors engulfed the market in the North Kordofan capital el-Obeid in Sudan's west, before police used tear gas to disperse them, three witnesses said.

    "They were shouting against the government and demanding change," said witness Ahmed who declined to give his full name.

    Pro-government newspapers carried front page warnings against protests which they said would cause chaos and turmoil.

    The Sudan Vision daily's editorial blamed the opposition.

    "Our message to those opposition dinosaurs is to unite their ideas and objectives for the benefit of the citizens if they are really looking for the welfare of the Sudanese people," it read.

    Sudan is in deep economic crisis which analysts blame on government overspending and misguided policies. A bloated import bill caused foreign currency shortages and forced an effective devaluation of the Sudanese pound last year, sparking soaring inflation.

    Early this month the government cut subsidies on petroleum products and key commodity sugar, triggering smaller protests throughout the north.

    Sunday's protests coincided with the first official announcement of results for a referendum on the oil-producing south's secession from the north showing an overwhelming vote for independence, which many in the north oppose.

    Police spokesman Ahmed al-Tuhami told Reuters the police did not have figures for any injured or arrested.

    "We did not use more violence than necessary -- we did not want anyone to spoil this day with the referendum results."

    (Additional reporting by Talal Ismail and Opheera McDoom, editing by Elizabeth Fullerton)
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    Default Re: Egypt is collapsing!

    Just heard Mubarak will announce he WILL STEP DOWN!


    At the next election....
    Libertatem Prius!


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