Page 34 of 91 FirstFirst ... 243031323334353637384484 ... LastLast
Results 661 to 680 of 1810

Thread: Syria

  1. #661
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    U.S. Anxiously Shaping Contingency Options for Syrian Chemical Arsenal

    Print
    • Share
    • Email
    • Twitter
    • Facebook
    • LinkedIn



    Dec. 6, 2012

    By Elaine M. Grossman
    Global Security Newswire


    Syrian President Bashar Assad, shown during a 2009 trip to Iran. The United States and its allies are preparing contingency plans for a number of scenarios related to Syria's chemical arsenal, according to U.S. officials and experts (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi).
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. and allied officials have spent increasingly long hours over the past several days planning intensely for potential military and diplomatic responses in the event that the Syrian chemical weapons threat heightens, according to government sources and experts.
    “There are essentially about 10 plans now in the works, each having a different flavor, each focusing on a different aspect of conflict, each committing the president to different options,” one defense expert with ties to Capitol Hill said this week. Details of the contingency plans are highly classified.
    President Obama and his national security team -- including his top military commander for the Mideast region, sources said -- want to avoid U.S. armed intervention in the ongoing Syria civil war unless embattled President Bashar Assad unleashes his chemical arsenal.
    Barring a poison gas incident that would cross a “red line” laid out by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in public comments this week, “General [James] Mattis has strongly recommended against using any military forces, strongly,” said this defense expert.
    At the same time, the Marine Corps general is taking the lead in planning how U.S. troops would respond if conditions in Syria demand it, according to sources.
    Mattis, who leads U.S. Central Command, on Wednesday declined comment.
    Several issue specialists and government officials this week requested anonymity to discuss sensitive military contingency planning. They described a heightened level of international diplomatic and military coordination following intelligence indications that Syria appeared to be preparing toxic chemicals capable of being weaponized. And, on Thursday, NBC News reported that Syrian gravity bombs were observed being loaded with sarin nerve gas.
    “There are clearly options available to the president regarding military capabilities,” said retired Lt. Col. Anthony Shaffer, a former Army intelligence officer. “There is always the need -- and always consideration [of] -- worst-case scenarios.”
    Neither Obama nor his secretary of State has spelled out all of the scenarios that might trigger U.S. or allied military intervention.
    What is clear, though, is that a verified chemical attack by Assad’s forces against rebel fighters, the Syrian people or neighboring nations could draw Washington into the conflict after months of largely remaining on the sidelines.
    The United States has provided humanitarian aid for Syrian opposition forces and displaced civilians, and more recently has begun advising and providing defensive support to neighboring nations Jordan and Turkey.
    “The world is watching,” Obama said in a warning to Assad during a Monday speech at National Defense University. “The use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. And if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences, and you will be held accountable.”
    Clinton on Wednesday alluded to other conditions in Syria -- including the diversion of deadly arms to other actors -- that could also prompt direct U.S. involvement.
    “Our concerns are that an increasingly desperate Assad regime might turn to chemical weapons, or might lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within Syria,” she said after meeting with other NATO foreign ministers in Brussels. “We have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account.”
    Israel, deeply concerned about this possible proliferation, was reported to have recently sought Jordanian assent for possible military strikes against Syrian chemical weapons facilities.
    “Israel will have no choice if [the United States or] someone else doesn’t” eliminate the Syrian chemical threat, said Charles Freilich, a former Israeli deputy national security adviser. At the same time, he acknowledged concerns that any “major confrontation” between Israel and Syria “potentially broadens to others, as well.”
    Yet, Washington’s closest Mideast ally “can’t afford to allow chemical weapons to fall into hands of Hezbollah, jihadis or whomever,” he told Global Security Newswire. “If they start trucking things to Lebanon, that is easy -- attack trucks -- but it probably won’t be so clear cut, won’t have clearly identifiable and attackable targets.”
    Both detecting and intercepting such a transfer would likely require U.S. or allied intelligence forces and special operations troops on the ground, performing a risky mission with limited prospects for success, according to several experts.
    “That particular scenario is so feared -- that is, that the stuff will go to Hezbollah or to a terrorist group outside the country -- that I think we’d be prepared to take the risks to prevent it,” said Leonard Spector, deputy director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies.
    Syria is believed to retain among the most sophisticated chemical-weapon capabilities in the Middle East, including stocks of sarin, mustard gas and possibly VX nerve agent. Roughly a dozen chemical arms production and storage facilities have been identified in Syria, though experts suspect toxic agents and their delivery systems also have been widely dispersed to smaller sites throughout the nation.
    Damascus is one of just six capitals that have neither signed nor ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, a 188-member pact calling for elimination of all arms that carry mustard blister agent, sarin nerve gas or similar compounds.
    Potential scenarios under U.S. discussion, according to issue experts and officials, could include:
    -- Chemical weapons use: “I think what the president was [saying was], ‘Use the stuff, and you've crossed the red line, and there will be consequences,’” Spector said in a Tuesday telephone interview. “Frankly it would be attributed to Assad personally that he gave the order,” given his rigid control over special weapons, he said.
    Such a turn of events would likely signal a substantial shift in Washington’s involvement in the Syrian conflict, namely military action to help remove the governing regime, several sources said. It could happen if viewed necessary to counter a rare use of deadly weapons of mass destruction, but it would not be done eagerly, U.S. officials and experts underscored.
    Obama administration leaders see enormous risk in committing U.S. troops in yet another Mideast conflict. The loss of life and treasure in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya have loomed large, while the benefits of stability in these nations -- and close partnerships with them -- have remained somewhat elusive.
    Concern is also widespread that a U.S.-led fight for Damascus could spark a broader war involving antagonists across the region.
    “The Iranians would pile on. The Syrians would pile on. The Iraqis would pile on,” said G.I. Wilson, a retired Marine colonel with extensive Middle East experience. “And I don’t know how it would turn out.”
    “Do we want to do this again?” a former senior military official said in a separate interview. “I don’t think so. Unless we really have to.”
    -- Imminent chemical attack: U.S. officials might act to block what appears to be an impending use of poison gas, in hopes of heading off a deadly disaster before it can occur.
    However, the intelligence would have to be extraordinarily timely and solid before Obama would authorize pre-emptive military action following costly missteps in Iraq and elsewhere, according to a number of issue experts.
    “I can understand the logic behind” a desire to prevent Assad from launching a chemical assault, said one international expert in chemical weapons. Nonetheless, “to carry out military action prior to [chemical] use, there’s a legal challenge there. How do you guess that use is imminent? Can you read the symbols on the artillery rounds?”
    Following the Iraq experience -- in which weapons of mass destruction suspected by the Bush administration were never found -- “[it] comes down to the reliability of intelligence,” the issue specialist said. “It would be surprising if somehow you had absolute clarity that, yes, they’re about to pull the trigger.”
    To preserve solidarity among U.S. allies on the Syria issue, Washington would be unlikely to conduct a pre-emptive strike, added the chemical arms expert.
    “I think the red line is clear,” the source said. “The red line is use of chemical weapons, ‘use’ underlined.”
    -- Transfer of chemical weapons abroad or to violent extremists: Any detected attempt to move special weapons to Lebanon or Iran, or to hand them off to Hezbollah or other terrorist groups, could prompt a limited interception strike.
    Chemical arms in terrorist hands “is something we’re very worried about,” Spector said. In such a case, U.S. military drones or aircraft might “attack a convoy or you parachute in at a border crossing … but it wouldn't be the same [level of involvement] as military intervention in the civil war,” he said.
    Depending on proximity to population centers, even an attack confined to chemical-weapon convoys might have disastrous consequences.
    “There’s two things that could happen, neither of which is good,” Wilson said. “They could hit the trucks, and there would be collateral damage from that. Or, they could miss the trucks, and there would be collateral damage from that.”
    “I can agree that if you’re just bombing it from the air and hoping for the best, that’s not so great,” said Spector. However, he noted that the risks of harming the civilian population would be considerably lower outside of cities. Commandos on the ground -- possibly with or without air support -- might be able to carry out this type of mission more precisely than could airstrikes alone, Spector said.
    -- Loss of government control over a chemical site: Despite Western support for Syrian opposition fighters, many capitals would be concerned if chemical arms fell under their control, according to Mideast watchers.
    “They are so disparate, it’s not clear how anybody getting hold of these things would use them,” the international chemical weapons expert said. “They don’t have any artillery; they don’t have airplanes. They could use them like improvised devices if they felt so inclined.”
    A U.S. response under this scenario, though, becomes “very complicated,” this source said.
    “Taking anticipatory action there, I think, would be really, really difficult,” the expert said. “That brings us right into the game. … Even with a drone strike, you’re participating in the armed conflict immediately. It becomes an international armed conflict right away.”
    An estimated 75,000 soldiers might be needed for a mission to secure Syria's chemical weapons infrastructure. That figure likely assumes that Assad’s military remains viable and foreign forces could not easily reach the facilities, according to Spector.
    “The 75,000, I believe, is on the assumption that you have to go in and fight your way into the sites,” he said.
    A smaller intervention force, though, might actually be capable of restoring arsenal security, Spector said. Syrian facilities “are physically isolated and they’re more likely to be cut off and abandoned” than to be heavily defended by Assad’s troops, he said. That could ease somewhat any mission to enter the nation to secure the sites, according to Spector.
    -- Collapse of the central government: “Should there be a catastrophic failure of the central government in Syria, you have to be ready to take extraordinary measures to make certain that chemical weapons do not fall into terrorist hands,” said Shaffer, now a senior fellow at the Center for Advanced Defense Studies.
    Under these circumstances, “I think there would be [U.S.] intervention but I think it would be different,” Spector said. If rebel forces gain control over the nation, U.S. forces or U.N. peacekeepers might be invited in to help secure the sensitive sites, he said.
    With hundreds of tons of chemical warfare material estimated in Syria, these stocks would likely be secured and ultimately destroyed on-site rather than moved outside of the nation’s borders, Spector said.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  2. #662
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Syria to U.N.: 'Serious fear' it will be framed for the use of chemical weapons

    By CNN Staff
    updated 8:27 AM EST, Mon December 10, 2012


    New aid for Syrian rebels?


    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    • Syria's Foreign Ministry has written two letters to the United Nations, state-run media says
    • The letters outline the government's fear that the United States will try to frame it
    • Syria cites recent media reports about the possible use of the weapons
    • At least 7 people have been killed Monday in fighting across Syria, the opposition says



    (CNN) -- Syria is raising concern in two letters to the United Nations that the United States may be attempting to frame it for the use of chemical weapons, Syrian state-run media reported Monday.
    The letters, addressed to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and chairman of the Security Council, repeated Damascus' previous pledge that it would not use chemical weapons, if it were in possession of them, in its ongoing violence.
    The move by President Bashar al-Assad's government follows recent reports that Syrian forces appear to have begun preparing chemical weapons for use. The United States and other nations have warned that the use of such weapons by al-Assad's forces is a "red line" that would prompt a swift international response.
    "The U.S. administration has consistently worked over the past year to launch a campaign of allegations on the possibility that Syria could use chemical weapons during the current crisis," the Foreign Ministry wrote in the letters, according to the state-run Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA).
    Photos: Showdown in Syria


    Cold, hunger add to misery in Aleppo
    U.S. plans for possible Syria strike
    Syria ready to use WMDs?
    The letters, which were delivered Saturday, cited recent media reports about the possible use of the weapons, according to SANA.
    "What raises concerns about this news circulated by the media is our serious fear that some of the countries backing terrorism and terrorists might provide the armed terrorist groups with chemical weapons and claim that it was the Syrian government that used the weapons," the letters said.
    News of the letters to the United Nations also follows a CNN report that the United States and some European allies are using defense contractors to train Syrian rebels on how to secure chemical weapons stockpiles in Syria.
    The report, which cites a senior U.S. official and several senior diplomats, said the training is taking place in Jordan and Turkey, and involves how to monitor and secure stockpiles and handle weapons sites and materials, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the issue.
    Some of the contractors are in Syria working with the rebels to monitor some of the sites, one of the officials said. The nationality of the trainers was not disclosed, though the officials cautioned against assuming all are American.
    Syria has been under enormous international pressure to end a more than 21-month civil war that has left tens of thousands dead.
    Al-Assad has refused to acknowledge the civil war, claiming his forces are battling "terrorists" backed by foreign countries bent on destabilizing Syria.
    News of the letters came the same day that the opposition reported fighting across Syria, including the capital city of Damascus and the flashpoint city of Homs.
    At least seven people were killed in clashes, including a woman and two children killed by shelling in a Damascus suburb, the Local Coordination Committees of Syria said.
    CNN is unable to confirm casualty reports as the government has severely restricted access by international journalists.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  3. #663
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,173
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 65 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Russia Rules Out Libyan Scenario in Syria

    Topic: Protests in Syria


    Situation in Syria


    ゥ REUTERS/ Yazan Homsy

    17:23 09/12/2012
    Tags: Bashar al-Assad, Sergei Lavrov, Syria, Russia
    Related News




    Multimedia





    MOSCOW, December 9 (RIA Novosti) - Russia will not allow a repetition of the Libyan scenario in Syria, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Sunday.

    “We’ll not allow the Libyan experience to be reproduced in Syria. Unfortunately our Western partners have departed from the Geneva accords and are seeking the departure of [Syrian President] Bashar al-Assad,” Lavrov said, adding Russia was not clinging to any individual leaders in Syria.

    Russia and China vetoed a Western-backed UN resolution on Syria on July 19 over fears that it would lead to foreign military intervention in the Middle East country.

    The resolution was tied to Chapter 7 of the UN Charter, which would have provided for the use of force to put an end to the rapidly escalating conflict.

    Russia says it has no special interest in seeing Assad remain in power, but that the “Syrian people” should decide his fate.

    A number of Western countries have been trying to persuade Moscow to support a resolution effectively authorizing a military
    operation, but Russia has repeatedly insisted that the Western drive for a stronger crackdown on Syria is preparation for a “Libyan scenario.”

    In Libya, rebels ousted and killed long-standing dictator Muammar Gaddafi in October 2011 after a months-long military standoff in which they received assistance from NATO forces. Russia did not use its veto power in the UN Security Council to block the intervention in Libya that was started under the pretext of protecting civilians there.

    Lavrov also said Russia was not holding any talks on the fate of embattled Assad.

    Meanwhile, Russian Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev said the Syrian leadership had assured Russia there was no danger of the spread of chemical weapons in the Middle East country.

    “The Syrian government is assuring us that it will not allow their spread [chemical weapons]. We hope that this will be so,” Patrushev said.

    He was echoed by Lavrov, who said Russia is more concerned that the chemical weapons could fall into hands of Assad's opponents, whose ranks allegedly include al-Qaida affiliates. Official Damascus said on Saturday that the insurgents have taken control of a chemical factory in Aleppo, which could be used to manufacture chemical weapons, AFP reported.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  4. #664
    Postman vector7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Where it's quiet, peaceful and everyone owns guns
    Posts
    21,173
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 65 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Russia arms Syria with powerful ballistic missiles

    by Reza Kahlili WND December 09, 2012



    Hours after NATO agreed on Tuesday to send Patriot missiles to Turkey because of the crisis in Syria, Russia delivered its first shipment of Iskander missiles to Syria.


    The superior Iskander can travel at hypersonic speed of over 1.3 miles per second (Mach 6-7) and has a range of over 280 miles with pinpoint accuracy of destroying targets with its 1,500-pound warhead, a nightmare for any missile defense system.

    According to Mashregh, the Iranian Revolutionary Guard media outlet, Russia had warned Turkey not to escalate the situation, but with Turkey’s request for Patriot missiles, it delivered its first shipment of Iskanders to Syria.


    Reporting today, Mashregh said the handover occurred when Russian naval logistic vessels docked at Tartus in Syria.

    The Iskandar is a surface-to-surface missile that no missile defense system can trace or destroy, Mashregh said. Russia had earlier threatened that should America put its missile defense system in Poland, it would retaliate by placing its Iskander missiles at Kaliningrad, its Baltic Sea port.



    Russia’s delivery of Iskanders to Bashar Assad’s embattled regime clearly shows that the security and stability of Syria remains Russia’s red line, Mashregh said. It is unknown how many of these missiles have been delivered but the numbers given are sufficient to destroy any Patriot missiles in Turkey, it said.

    The delivery of the missile not only threatens the security of Turkey but also Israel, which would have to recalculate its strategy with its defensive and offensive capabilities.

    As reported in a WND exclusive on Dec. 5, Iran’s Islamic regime also sees the toppling of the Assad regime as its red line and has 170 ballistic missiles targeting Tel Aviv in underground missile silos, some with biological warheads.

    In August, a commentary in Mashregh, representing the regime’s views, warned America and Israel that further instability in Syria would spark a pre-emptive attack on Israel in which the use of weapons of mass destruction – biological, chemical and even nuclear bombs – won’t be off the table. It stated that certain groups (proxies, such as Hezbollah) have been armed with WMDs and that Israel will be their target.

    The Mashregh commentary charged that Israel is one of the conspirators behind the Syrian crisis in order to strategically change the geopolitics of the region and defeat one of the main players in the Islamic world’s “resistance front” (Iran, Syria and Hezbollah). It warned Israel that with the direction it has chosen, “There is a dead end, and the threat of mass killing awaits.”

    The Islamic regime in Iran for its part continues to ship arms to Syria via Iraq both by air and ground while its Quds Forces help the Assad regime in killing its own people. To date, over 40,000 people, including many women and children, have died since the Syrian uprising began in March of 2011.

    Reports indicate that Assad has decided to use chemical weapons on his own people as a last attempt to save his rule. Speaking in Prague on Monday, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton warned Syria that the use of chemical weapons would be a red line, indicating that America would retaliate.

    Meanwhile, Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, has ordered the Guards and its Quds Forces to use all of their capabilities to protect Assad and has threatened war against those helping the rebels in Syria, primarily Saudi Arabia and Turkey, according to a source who had served in the Revolutionary Guards intelligence unit but who has since defected.

    The source added that the recent Gaza conflict was a warning to America and Israel that the Islamic regime in Iran can destabilize the region further should the push in Syria continue to topple Assad. The region will witness terrorist attacks, assassinations and incitement for uprisings in countries allied with America as the situation in Syria further deteriorates, the regime has promised, according to the source.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    Nikita Khrushchev: "We will bury you"
    "Your grandchildren will live under communism."
    添ou Americans are so gullible.
    No, you won稚 accept
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    outright, but we値l keep feeding you small doses of
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l finally wake up and find you already have communism.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    ."
    We値l so weaken your
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    until you値l
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    like overripe fruit into our hands."



  5. #665
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Hmmm...

    One would think those the perfect weapons for the use of things like, say... Sarin gas... huh?
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  6. #666
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Syria rebels are claiming that Syria has already used chemical weapons.

    There is no independent confirmation of this yet.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  7. #667
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    found an article

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/syrian-...emical-attack/

    Syrian rebels claim new video shows victims of chemical attack

    Israeli special forces reportedly operating on the ground in Syria, monitoring chemical weapons stockpile

    By Times of Israel staff December 9, 2012, 6:59 am

    Tweet





    Alleged victims of a Syrian chemical attack seen in a screen capture from a YouTube video uploaded by Syrian rebels on Saturday, December 8, 2012

    <script language="javascript" src="http://adserver.adtech.de/addyn|3.0|1158|4131476|0|168|ADTECH;AdId=8368005;B nId=-1;;loc=700;target=_blank;misc=[timestamp];rdclick="></script><noscript><a href="http://adserver.adtech.de/adlink|3.0|1158|4131476|0|168|ADTECH;AdId=8368005; BnId=-1;;loc=300;misc=[timestamp]" target="_blank;AdId=8368005;BnId=-1;"><img src="http://adserver.adtech.de/adserv|3.0|1158|4131476|0|168|ADTECH;loc=300;misc=[timestamp]" border="0" width="120" height="600"></a></noscript>

    Syrian rebels on Saturday uploaded to YouTube a clip purportedly depicting victims of a chemical weapons attack perpetrated by the regime. The video shows Syrian civilians, some apparently dead and others injured, whose faces were disfigured in a manner that could be caused by a chemical agent.
    The rebels claim that the video was filmed in a suburb of Aleppo, where the Syrian regime reportedly maintains its largest depot of chemical weapons.
    Citing intelligence reports, British Foreign Secretary William Hague on Saturday warned that the Syrian government might use its sizable stockpile of chemical weapons against the rebels fighting to overturn Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime, AFP reported.
    “We are extremely concerned about the stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons, and we are also concerned about evidence during the last couple of weeks that the regime could use them,” Hague said on the sidelines of a regional security conference in Manama, the capital of Bahrain.
    The London-based Sunday Times reported that Israeli commandos were on the ground in Syria, monitoring the regime’s chemical weapons depots.
    “For years we’ve known the exact location of Syria’s chemical and biological munitions,” an Israeli source said was quoted as saying. “But in the past week we’ve got signs that munitions have been moved to new locations.”
    On Saturday, the Free Syrian Army announced that it had captured trucks belonging to the regime on the road leading to the Damascus international airport. The rebels claimed that some of the equipment they captured was meant to protect Syrian army soldiers from the effects of chemical weapons.
    On Wednesday, the London Times reported that the US, along with several key allies, was prepared to launch a military intervention in Syria should the Assad government resort to using chemical weapons against the rebels.
    A military source told the Times that US forces could be ready “rapidly, within days,” if Syrian chemical weapons were activated, and implied that the necessary forces were already in the region.
    “It won’t require major movement to make action happen. The muscle is already there to be flexed,” the source said. “It’s premature to say what could happen if a decision is made to intervene. That hasn’t taken shape, we’ve not reached that kind of decision. There are a lot of options, but it [military action] could be launched rapidly, within days.”
    The fate of Syria’s chemical weapon stockpiles, believed to be the third-largest in the world, is emerging as a key international issue as the civil war continues to generate chaos.
    Israel is particularly concerned that Syrian chemical and biological weapons could fall into the hands of terrorists and be used against the Jewish state.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  8. #668
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    PlayStation-Controlled DIY Tank May Be the Wildest Weapon Yet in the Syria War






    Syria’s rebels may have taken the concept of a videogame a tad too far. A homemade rebel tank has recently been seen rolling down the road like a post-apocalyptic battle wagon — and armed with a machine gun controlled like it’s a PlayStation.
    The Sham II — reportedly so named after ancient Syria — is also ready to be added to the rebels’ growing arsenal of DIY weapons. According to the AFP, a rebel engineer based near the city of Aleppo spent a month building the armored vehicle around a re-purposed car chassis, added cameras to it, and then hooked up a machine gun to a PlayStation controller and a TV screen inside. Four meters long and two meters wide, the vehicle is now readying to “join the fray in Aleppo as part of the Saad Benmoaz battalion of the Al-Ansar brigade.”
    It’s the gun that makes it into a proper fighting vehicle, if on the crude side. The machine gun appears to be a 7.62 millimeter PKM with a camera hooked onto it. This gun and its camera are also controlled by a game controller from inside the truck. The driver, meanwhile, has a TV screen linked to three cameras mounted to Sham II’s front with a fourth camera in the back. Protecting both the driver and gunner are 2.5 centimeters of steel plating, which can’t resist rounds from tanks or rocket-propelled grenades but is reportedly able to withstand fire from a 23-millimeter cannon.
    “Not including from the gun, the vehicle costs about $10,000,” a rebel named Abud, whose brother built the vehicle, told the AFP.
    But it’s hard to say how effective the machine really is at resisting bullets. If the armor is sloppily built, it risks being knocked out by “spall.” That’s what happens when a piece of armor is hit by a projectile of sufficient power, and the armor is strong enough to stop the round from penetrating, but is still hit with enough force to cause a concussive blast wave to detach shards of material from the armor’s interior side. The blast wave then propels that material through the interior of the vehicle at incredibly high speeds. That can be very lethal to passengers and crew, and means that bad armor can often be worse than no armor at all.
    The Sham II is also reportedly an upgrade to an even cruder predecessor. The first Sham has already seen combat, but only had enough armor to protect the driver. Syria’s rebels aren’t the only insurgents building crude, homemade armored trucks, either. Mexican drug cartels use them, often F-150s and semi-trucks re-purposed with steel plates, firing ports and room for passengers.
    The thing is, the rebels also have real tanks captured from Assad’s army. Those have been used in recent weeks to repeatedly shell regime troops and bases, as the rebels continue seizing territory, particularly in Syria’s north. On Sunday, a rebel group comprised of Islamic extremists reportedly captured a major military base to the west of Aleppo — the last base to the city’s west that was still under Assad’s control. But the war isn’t over yet, and the rebels need every piece of equipment they can get their hands on; which apparently now includes a meatspace videogame.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  9. #669
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,464
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Donaldson View Post
    PlayStation-Controlled DIY Tank May Be the Wildest Weapon Yet in the Syria War
    Some video of the "tank" in action...







    And, the same video made mo' betta by yours truly...




    Now tell me you weren't thinking that while watching the first one.

  10. #670
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Panetta: Syria chemical weapon threat has slowed

    The Oval

    David JacksonShareComments


    9:33AM EST December 11. 2012 - The prospect of U.S. and allied action against Syria over chemical weapons appears to be lessening.
    Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters that new intelligence indicates that Syria may be backing off any plans to use chemical weapons against rebel forces.
    "We haven't seen anything new indicating any aggressive steps to move forward in that way," Panetta said during a flight to Kuwait, adding that U.S. officials "continue to monitor it very closely and we continue to make clear to them that they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population.
    "That would produce serious consequences," Panetta, echoing a threat made last week by President Obama.
    From CBS News:
    "Rebel fighters have now inched so close to Assad's stronghold, the capital city of Damascus, that top U.S. officials had expressed fears the cornered dictator could try and use his chemical weapons as a last resort to try and avoid being toppled by the 21-month uprising.
    "Syrian government officials have refused to confirm that they even posses chemical or biological weapons -- saying only that if they did have them, they would not use them against the Syrian people, or anyone else."
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  11. #671
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    FNC reporting that several Scud D missiles have been launhed "from Damascus" against areas full of people. The rockets are armed with incendiary devices (I saw some home video/cellphone type) showing large burning balls of what might have been magnesium.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  12. #672
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    here's a news article on it:

    What Syria’s Scud missile launches tell us about the regime’s thinking

    Posted by Max Fisher on December 12, 2012 at 1:20 pm


    Syrian regime forces have fired several Scud missiles at rebels for the first time, the New York Times reports, citing unnamed U.S. officials. Scuds are inaccurate but nasty weapons and analysts say Syria may have as many as 700 Scud-D missiles with a range of up to 440 miles. That’s about the distance from northern Syria to the Turkish capital of Ankara. The missiles, which can be difficult to shoot down, are perhaps best known from Saddam Hussein’s attempt during the 1991 Gulf War to deter the West by firing 88 Scuds toward Israel. Most troubling, they can be fitted with chemical weapons, of which Syria has quite a stockpile.


    What does this move actually tell us about Syria’s conflict? It’s hard to say, in part because Scud missiles are an odd choice for use against nearby rebel positions. As international relations professor Robert Farley explains, the missiles are big but not very accurate, making artillery or air strikes probably a better choice for attacking local rebel positions. It’s possible that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime is simply lashing out in desperation; rebels have been gradually advancing, seizing military bases and making Assad’s fall seem more likely.


    It’s also possible that the Scuds are as much about scaring outside powers as about fighting rebels; a reminder to Western powers and maybe neighboring Turkey that Assad has a big Scud arsenal, and a warning that he has no qualms about using them. On Tuesday, President Obama announced that the United States formally recognizes a Syrian opposition group as the country’s legitimate representative. This may have heightened concerns inside Syria’s regime that the United States could get more assertive in supporting rebels.


    Whatever the motivation for Assad’s regime in firing the Scud missiles, it’s worth underscoring that they are an odd choice for fighting bands of rebel fighters. Farley, the university professor, explains this better than I could in a series of tweets. Jargon guide: CW stands for “chemical weapons;” CEP stands for “circular error probability,” a measure of missile accuracy. When Farley says that Scuds have a 50 meter CEP, that means that, if you aim the missiles at a specific spot, there’s a 50 percent chance it will land within 50 meters. If you’re firing them at rebel groups, that’s not very accurate at all.

    Even if you’re firing at a fortified rebel position, Scuds aren’t accurate enough to do a ton of effective damage, unless CW armed.

    — Robert Farley (@drfarls) December 12, 2012
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  13. #673
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Maybe they were thermite?


    Assad regime firing Scud missiles in Syria, US official says

    Published December 12, 2012

    FoxNews.com

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/12...#ixzz2Erm5GxPB


    Embattled Syrian President Bashar Assad has added a new wrinkle in his war with the newly U.S.-recognized Syrian rebels: Scud missiles.

    A senior U.S. defense official says Assad's regime has fired roughly six Scud missiles from Damascus, but there are no immediate reports of casualties.

    The New York Times reports the missiles are targeting areas in northern Syria controlled by the Free Syrian Army.

    "Using Scuds to target tanks or military bases is one thing," an official told the New York Times. "Using them to target rebels hiding in playgrounds at schools is something else."

    The use of Scud missiles also raises alarm because the Soviet-designed missile can be used to deliver chemical weapons. Western officials have warned Assad could unleash his chemical weapons stockpile against rebel forces.

    In a press briefing Wednesday, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney could not confirm reports of the Scud missiles fired, but said if it were true it would be "the latest desperate act from the regime showing utter disregard for the lives of citizens."

    "If it proves true, it would be another indication of the depravity of Assad," Carney said.

    Meanwhile, rebels continued their advance toward Damascus as fighting intensified in the southern districts of the Syrian capital and its suburbs.

    State TV reported an explosion targeting the Syrian Interior Ministry building on Wednesday. There was no immediate word on casualties.

    Rebels have targeted the center of Damascus with bomb attacks in the past, most dramatically in July when they detonated explosives inside a high-level crisis meeting in Damascus that killed four top regime officials, including Assad's brother-in-law and the defense minister, The Associated Press reports.

    An Al Qaeda linked group, Jabhat al-Nusra, has claimed many deadly blasts inside Syria.

    On the political front, more than 100 countries recognized a new opposition coalition as the legitimate representative of the Syrian people during an international meeting being held in Morocco. The U.S. also has declared the coalition is the "legitimate representative" of its country's people. The moves open the way for greater humanitarian assistance to the forces battling Assad and possibly even military aid.

    But the presence of extremist groups among the rebel forces has raised concerns in the U.S. and other nations that are supporting the opposition in Syria but do not want to see extremists gain power in the region. The U.S. has blacklisted Jabhat al-Nusra -- Arabic for Victory Front -- as a foreign terrorist organization and said the group was part of Al Qaeda in Iraq.

    Al-Nusra fighters appear to be among the most effective fighting forces on the rebel side, spearheading many recent gains, according to the Associated Press.

    Western officials have raised concerns that an increasingly desperate Assad might unleash his chemical weapons against rebels.

    Syria is believed to have a formidable arsenal of chemical weapons, including sarin and mustard gas, although its exact dimensions are not known. Syria is not a signatory to the 1997 Convention on Chemical Weapons and thus is not obliged to permit international inspection.

    The government in Damascus has been careful not to confirm it has chemical weapons, while insisting it would never use such weapons against its own people.

    On Wednesday, Human Rights Watch accused the Syrian military of using air-delivered incendiary bombs in at least four locations across Syria since mid-November. Such weapons can contain any number of flammable substances, including napalm, thermite, or white phosphorus, and are designed to set fire to objects or to cause burn injuries. They are not considered chemical weapons.

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/12...#ixzz2Erm1RDaU
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  14. #674
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    hahahahahaha "accused". Ya THINK?

    News Column Israel Accused of Covert Ops in Syria

    Dec. 10, 2012








    Israel is covertly monitoring Syria's chemical and biological weapons, The Sunday Times of London reported.

    "For years we've known the exact location of Syria's chemical and biological munitions," an Israeli source told the newspaper, adding, " ... in the past week we've got signs that munitions have been moved to new locations."

    The newspaper said the Israeli's intention is to track Syria's non-conventional armaments and sabotage their development. Special Israeli forces are operating as spotters, the newspaper said.

    The decision to pursue this strategy came after Israel rejected the idea of conducting an aerial or ground assault to destroy Syrian President Bashar Assad's stockpile of chemical weapons, mainly purchased from Russia, the newspaper said.

    If it becomes apparent that chemical weapons are being used by Assad, then Israel and the United States may coordinate to carry out a ground invasion, the newspaper said.

    There has been no Israeli government response to the report.

    U.S. officials said the White House and its allies are weighing military operations to secure Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons, Haaretz said.

    Israel has also been in contact with Jordan to coordinate the issue. Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh said his country is preparing "for different scenarios" and said the use of chemical weapons by Syria would be considered a "game changer."

    The Syrian Network for Human Rights said 107 people, including one child and one woman, were killed Sunday as a result of the hostilities.

    Syrian rebels Saturday captured a chloride factory at Al Safira east of Aleppo considered to be the country's biggest chemical weapons store and base, which also houses Syrian Scud D missiles armed with chemical warheads adjusted to fire at Israel, Debka.com reported.

    The Israeli military news website said the fall of Al Safira and the chemical weapons stockpile into rebel hands puts the Assad regime at high risk.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  15. #675
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Interesting....




    December 6, 2012 - 3:00pm

    This Is How the Missiles That Nato’s Deployed Actually, Y’Know, Work


    Chris Mills -
    OMG! Quick! Nato’s deployed missiles against Syria! It’s all escalating and the world’s going to end, break out the tinned food and the nuclear shelter! Before you get your apocalyptic knickers in a twist though, it’s worth having a look at what sort of missiles exactly Nato’s given to Turkey as an early Christmas present.
    Just to get things straight, the basic facts are: Turkey, which shares a border with Syria, is feeling miffed that they’ve been on the receiving end of weapons fired from Syria. As a precautionary measure, Turkey asked the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (which yes, the UK is part of) to deploy defensive missiles to Turkey. The bigwigs in NATO agreed, and Germany and the Netherlands are sending some of their super-expensive PAC-3 Patriot missile batteries to Turkey.

    The Basics




    The basic premise of the Patriot system (Phased Array Tracking Intercept Of Target, yet another example of a horrifically shoehorned acronym) is really quite simple: use your own missiles to shoot down stuff headed at you. Originally, the “stuff headed at you” was meant to be planes; by now, the major threat is other missiles, like the Soviet-made Scud missiles Saddam Hussein used to be so fond of (Syria’s also got some lying around). Though it might sound simple, it’s actually really, really difficult to make two Mach-5 objects hit into each other.


    The Patriot system is made up of four key components: the radar, the missiles (in big truck-shaped launchers), the control centre with all the radios, and a massive set of generators to power everything. It’s not a small set-up, and each Patriot battery deploys with around 100 soldiers to make everything work.

    How it all fits together




    The radar is the key thing in the Patriot system. It’s the first component in the chain: it detects any nasty incoming missiles within an approximate 100km radius, and then feeds information about its range, altitude, size, and shape (and probably whether it prefers tea or coffee) back to the central control station. This is a big Portakabin, which contains bank after bank of computers, and space for a few operators. Once data about targets is fed back to it, the operators decide whether or not to blow stuff out of the sky.


    Once authorisation is given, everything starts happening. The computer bring the missile launchers into “operate” mode; and locks onto the target with the radar. Once the computer decides the time is perfect, the system fires the missiles (normally two missiles are fired at each target; after all, we wouldn’t want anything to actually survive).


    For the first part of their flight, the missiles are directed by a radio link with the control centre. The radar tracks both the target and the missiles themselves, and like a naughty air traffic controller, the computer tries to co-ordinate everything to make the two missiles collide. Once the missiles get near to the target, they switch on their own radars, embedded in the nose, to guide them in the last part of the way. This close-in guidance is crucial, because the missiles actually have to physically collide with their targets; unlike most anti-air missiles, which just blow up near the targets and hope to destroy them, the Patriot missiles do a proper kamikaze and fly straight through the nose of the target missile, hopefully obliterating it. That’s the idea, anyway; the missiles don’t always work.

    Why it isn’t always that simple




    Phew; that’s quite a long process, all just to shoot down a missile. Now remember, that all has to happen at several times the speed of sound, and literally within seconds.

    Adding to the complexity, the Patriot system can engage multiple targets at once (because like London buses, hostile missiles all tend to arrive at once), with the radar simeltaneously tracking up to 100 targets and 9 missiles, all at the same time. Think Missile Defence but without the sexy graphics.



    Your Bonus Fun Facts
    - Although its accuracy in the 1991 Gulf War was questionable, it seemed to be rather good at shooting things down in 2003: Patriot systems were responsible for downing a RAF Tornado and an American F-18 during the 2003 Iraq War. Hopefully, if it can shoot down our own planes, it’ll work against Syria.


    - Each launcher contains 16 missiles, and at somewhere between 5 to 8 launchers per battery, that’s a good 80 missiles just sitting around.


    - Once you’ve fired off all your missiles, it takes a freaking crane to reload the batteries — no slick reloads here, I’m afraid.


    - Each missile costs in the 」1 million range — that’s a helluva lot of money


    - Though the radar has a range of a good 100km, the missiles themselves are only good out to 15km. This means that the number of Patriot batteries NATO would need to effectively defend Turkey’s borders would be really rather high.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  16. #676
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    I can't get to this site from work... here's the Google information:

    Israel Matzav: Syria using white phosphorus bombs on civilians

    israelmatzav.blogspot.com/.../syria-using-white-phosphorus-bombs-o...
    3 days ago – The use of white phosphorus bombs as an offensive weapon ... White Phosphorus can be used to destroy the enemy's equipment or to ... Born in Boston, I was a corporate and securities attorney in New York City for seven years before making aliya to Israel in 1991 (I don't look it but I ... Like what you see?


    It's a blog though - so not too sure about it.

    Here's another:

    Suspected use of White Phosphorus in Syria - 4 videos | .processing

    board-temporary.blogspot.com/.../suspected-use-of-white-phosphoro...
    Nov 20, 2012 – Suspected use of White Phosphorus in Syria - 4 videos ... what is seen in the videos in this post, and does not include white phosphorus. .... Video showing what looks like remains of a cluster bomb canitser and submunitions.


    After doing some quick checks, I'm pretty sure those bombs are white phosphorus. Probably not too "deadly" unless someone happens to be in the midst of a blast. They are likely trying to destroy the rebel's vision (cameras, videos, etc)

    White Phosphorus (WP)

    Israel used White Phosphorus against HAMAS targets in Gaza during Operation Cast Lead in January 2009. This violated no international laws or conventions.
    White Phosphorus (WP), known as Willy Pete, is used for signaling, screening, and incendiary purposes. White Phosphorus can be used to destroy the enemy's equipment or to limit his vision. It is used against vehicles, petroleum, oils and lubricants (POL) and ammunition storage areas, and enemy observers. WP can be used as an aid in target location and navigation. It is usually dispersed by explosive munitions. It can be fired with fuze time to obtain an airburst. White phosphorus was used most often during World War II in military formulations for smoke screens, marker shells, incendiaries, hand grenades, smoke markers, colored flares, and tracer bullets.
    The Battle of Fallujah was conducted from 8 to 20 November 2004 with the last fire mission on 17 November. The battle was fought by an Army, Marine and Iraqi force of about 15,000 under the I Marine Expeditionary Force (IMEF). US forces found WP to be useful in the Battle of Fallujah. "WP proved to be an effective and versatile munition. We used it for screening missions at two breeches and, later in the fight, as a potent psychological weapon against the insurgents in trench lines and spider holes when we could not get effects on them with HE. We fired "shake and bake" missions at the insurgents, using WP to flush them out and HE to take them out. ... We used improved WP for screening missions when HC smoke would have been more effective and saved our WP for lethal missions."
    White phosphorus is not banned by any treaty to which the United States is a signatory. Smokes and obscurants comprise a category of materials that are not used militarily as direct chemical agents. The United States retains its ability to employ incendiaries to hold high-priority military targets at risk in a manner consistent with the principle of proportionality that governs the use of all weapons under existing law. The use of white phosphorus or fuel air explosives are not prohibited or restricted by Protocol III of the Certain Conventional Weapons Convention (CCWC), the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons which may be Deemed to be Excessively Injurious or to have Indiscriminate Effects, which regulates the use of "any weapon or munition which is primarily designed to set fire to objects or to cause burn injury to persons . . ."
    White Phosphorus (WP) - Incendiary

    WP is a colorless to yellow translucent wax-like substance with a pungent, garlic-like smell. The form used by the military is highly energetic (active) and ignites once it is exposed to oxygen. White phosphorus is a pyrophoric material, that is, it is spontaneously flammable).
    When exposed to air, it spontaneously ignites and is oxidized rapidly to phosphorus pentoxide. Such heat is produced by this reaction that the element bursts into a yellow flame and produces a dense white smoke. Phosphorus also becomes luminous in the dark, and this property is conveyed to "tracer bullets." This chemical reaction continues until either all the material is consumed or the element is deprived of oxygen. Up to 15 percent of the WP remains within the charred wedge and can reignite if the felt is crushed and the unburned WP is exposed to the atmosphere.
    White phosphorus results in painful chemical burn injuries. The resultant burn typically appears as a necrotic area with a yellowish color and characteristic garliclike odor. White phosphorus is highly lipid soluble and as such, is believed to have rapid dermal penetration once particles are embedded under the skin. Because of its enhanced lipid solubility, many have believed that these injuries result in delayed wound healing. This has not been well studied; therefore, all that can be stated is that white phosphorus burns represent a small subsegment of chemical burns, all of which typically result in delayed wound healing.
    Incandescent particles of WP may produce extensive burns. Phosphorus burns on the skin are deep and painful; a firm eschar is produced and is surrounded by vesiculation. The burns usually are multiple, deep, and variable in size. The solid in the eye produces severe injury. The particles continue to burn unless deprived of atmospheric oxygen. Contact with these particles can cause local burns. These weapons are particularly nasty because white phosphorus continues to burn until it disappears. If service members are hit by pieces of white phosphorus, it could burn right down to the bone. Burns usually are limited to areas of exposed skin (upper extremities, face). Burns frequently are second and third degree because of the rapid ignition and highly lipophilic properties of white phosphorus.
    If burning particles of WP strike and stick to the clothing, take off the contaminated clothing quickly before the WP burns through to the skin. Remove quickly all clothing affected by phosphorus to prevent phosphorus burning through to skin. If this is impossible, plunge skin or clothing affected by phosphorus in cold water or moisten strongly to extinguish or prevent fire. Then immediately remove affected clothing and rinse affected skin areas with cold sodium bicarbonate solution or with cold water. Moisten skin and remove visible phosphorus (preferably under water) with squared object (knife-back etc.) or tweezers. Do not touch phosphorus with fingers! Throw removed phosphorus or clothing affected by phosphorus into water or allow to bum in suitable location. Cover phosphorus burns with moist dressing and keep moist to prevent renewed inflammation. It is neccessary to dress white phosphorus-injured patients with saline-soaked dressings to prevent reignition of the phosphorus by contact with the air.
    Some nations recommend washing the skin with a 0.5-2.0% copper sulphate solution or a copper sulphate impregnated pad. Wounds may be rinsed with a 0.1%-0.2% copper sulphate solution, if available. Dark coloured deposits may be removed with forceps. Prevent prolonged contact of any copper sulphate preparations with the tissues by prompt, copious flushing with water or saline, as there is a definite danger of copper poisoning. It may be necessary to repeat the first aid measures to completely remove all phosphorus.
    White Phosphorus (WP) - Smoke

    White Phosphorus (WP) creates a smoke screen as it burns. Phosphorus smokes are generated by a variety of munitions. Some of these munitions such as the M825 (155-mm round) may, on explosion, distribute particles of incompletely oxidized white phosphorus.
    Smokes obscure vision and are used to hide troops, equipment, and areas from detection. Smoke screens are essential for movement in city fighting. In the December 1994 battle for Grozny in Chechnya, every fourth or fifth Russian artillery or mortar round fired was a smoke or white phosphorus round.
    White Phosphorus and Red Phosphorus burn to produce a hygroscopic smoke containing phosphoric acids. Red phosphorus (RP) is not nearly as reactive as white phosphorus. It reacts slowly with atmospheric moisture and the smoke does not produce thermal injury, hence the smoke is less toxic. The extinction for these smokes is primarily due to scattering in the visible and absorption in the infrared (IR). These smokes are composed of spherical liquid particles that grow with relative humidity to an equilibrium size by absorbing ambient moisture that depends on the ambient relative humidity. The mass extinction varies significantly with relative humidity.
    The White Phosphorus flame produces a hot, dense white smoke composed of particles of phosphorus pentoxide, which are converted by moist air into phosphoric acid. This acid, depending on concentration and duration of exposure, may produce a variety of topically irritative injuries.
    Most smokes are not hazardous in concentrations which are useful for obscuring purposes. However, any smoke can be hazardous to health if the concentration is sufficient or if the exposure is long enough. Medical personnel should be prepared to treat potential reactions to military smokes once such smokes have been introduced to the battlefield. Exposure to heavy smoke concentrations for extended periods (particularly if near the source of emission) may cause illness or even death.
    Casualties from WP smoke have not occurred in combat operations. At room temperature, white phosphorus is somewhat volatile and may produce a toxic inhalational injury. In moist air, the phosphorus pentoxide produces phosphoric acid. This acid, depending on concentration and duration of exposure, may produce a variety of topically irritative injuries. Irritation of the eyes and irritation of the mucous membranes are the most commonly seen injuries. These complaints remit spontaneously with the soldier's removal from the exposure site. With intense exposures, a very explosive cough may occur, which renders gas mask adjustment difficult. There are no reported deaths resulting from exposure to phosphorus smokes. Generally, treatment of WP smoke irritation is unnecessary. Spontaneous recovery is rapid.
    White phosphorus fume can cause severe eye irritation with blepharospasm, photophobia, and lacrimation. Irritation of the eyes and irritation of the mucous membranes are the most commonly seen injuries. These complaints remit spontaneously with the soldier's removal from the exposure site. The WP smoke irritates the eyes and nose in moderate concentrations. With intense exposures, a very explosive cough may occur, which renders gas mask adjustment difficult. There are no reported deaths resulting from exposure to phosphorus smokes.
    White Phosphorus - Non-Military Applications

    The amazing thing is that White Phosphorus is used in almost every product imaginable - from soft drinks to toothpaste. White phosphorus is used by industry to produce phosphoric acid and other chemicals for use in fertilizers, food additives, and cleaning compounds. Small amounts of white phosphorus were used in the past in pesticides and fireworks.
    In recent years, concentrated phosphoric acids, which may contain as much as 70% to 75% P2O5 content, have become of great importance to agriculture and farm production. World-wide demand for fertilizers has caused record phosphate production. Phosphates are used in the production of special glasses, such as those used for sodium lamps.
    Bone-ash, calcium phosphate, is used to create fine chinaware and to produce mono-calcium phosphate, used in baking powder. Phosphorus is also important in the production of steels, phosphor bronze, and many other products. Trisodium phosphate is important as a cleaning agent, as a water softener, and for preventing boiler scale and corrosion of pipes and boiler tubes.
    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and numerous state/local law enforcement authorities throughout the United States, have noted an alarming trend involving illicit methamphetamine production. Methamphetamine (AKA speed, crank or meth) is a major drug problem in the United States. All businesses engaged in the sale of red phosphorus, white phosphorus and hypophosphorous acid products should be aware of the use of these products by clandestine methamphetamine laboratory operators.
    White Phosphorus - Background

    Phosphorus is an element, the name derived from the Greek "phosphoros" or light bearing, the ancient name for the planet Venus when appearing before sunrise. Brand discovered phosphorus in 1669 by preparing it from urine. Phosphorus exists in four or more allotropic forms: white (or yellow), red, and black (or violet). Ordinary phosphorus is a waxy white solid; when pure it is colorless and transparent. White phosphorus has two modifications: alpha and beta with a transition temperature at -3.8oC. It is insoluble in water, but soluble in carbon disulfide.
    Never found free in nature, Phosphorus is widely distributed in combination with minerals. Phosphate rock, which contains the mineral apatite, an impure tri-calcium phosphate, is an important source of the element. Large deposits are found in Russia, in Morocco, and in Florida, Tennessee, Utah, Idaho, and elsewhere.
    White phosphorus may be made by several methods. By one process, tri-calcium phosphate, the essential ingredient of phosphate rock, is heated in the presence of carbon and silica in an electric furnace or fuelfired furnace. Elementary phosphorus is liberated as vapor and may be collected under phosphoric acid, an important compound in making super-phosphate fertilizers.
    White Phosphorus (WP) - Other Health Effects

    Systemic toxicity may occur if therapy is not administered. Therapy consists of topical use of a bicarbonate solution to neutralize phosphoric acids and mechanical removal and debridement of particles. A Wood's lamp in a darkened room may help to identify remaining luminescent particles. The early signs of systemic intoxication by phosphorus are abdominal pain, jaundice, and a garlic odor of the breath; prolonged intake may cause anemia, as well as cachexia and necrosis of bone, involving typically the maxilla and mandible (phossy jaw). Prolonged absorption of phosphorus causes necrosis of bones. It is a hepatotoxin.
    The presenting complaints of overexposed workers may be toothache and excessive salivation. There may be a dull red appearance of the oral mucosa. One or more teeth may loosen, with subsequent pain and swelling of the jaw; healing may be delayed following dental procedures such as extractions; with necrosis of bone, a sequestrum may develop with sinus tract formation. In a series of 10 cases, the shortest period of exposure to phosphorus fume (concentrations not measured) that led to bone necrosis was 10 months (two cases), and the longest period of exposure was 18 years.
    Signs and symptoms include irritation of the eyes and the respiratory tract; abdominal pain, nausea, and jaundice; anemia, cachexia, pain, and loosening of teeth, excessive salivation, and pain and swelling of the jaw; skin and eye burns. Phossy jaw must be differentiated from other forms of osteomyelitis. With phossy jaw, a sequestrum forms in the bone and is released from weeks to months later; the sequestra are light in weight, yellow to brown, osteoporotic, and decalcified, whereas sequestra from acute staphylococcal osteomyelitis are sharp, white spicules of bone, dense and well calcified. In acute staphylococcal osteomyelitis, the radiographic picture changes rapidly and closely follows the clinical course, but with phossy jaw the diagnosis sometimes is clinically obvious before radiological changes are discernible. It is good dental practice to take routine X-ray films of jaws, but experience indicates that necrosis can occur in the absence of any pathology that is visible on the roentgenogram.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  17. #677
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    From Huffingdrugspost and Human Rights Watch:

    Human Rights Watch

    Defending human rights world wide

    GET UPDATES FROM Human Rights Watch


    Like

    261





    Syria: Incendiary Weapons Used in Populated Areas

    Posted: 12/12/2012 11:07 am

    React

    Important
    Fascinating
    Typical
    Scary
    Outrageous
    Amazing
    Infuriating
    Beautiful

    Follow

    Syria , Video , Incendiary Bombs , Quseir , World News



    share this story

    17
    30
    1

    Submit this story






    (Washington, DC) – The Syrian military has used air-delivered incendiary bombs in at least four locations across Syria since mid-November2012, Human Rights Watch said today. The conclusion is based on interviews with four witnesses and multiple videos analyzed by Human Rights Watch.

    The Syrian military should cease its use of incendiary weapons immediately, Human Rights Watch said. A total of 106 nations have prohibited the use of air-delivered incendiary weapons, which cause serious burns, in populated areas, but Syria has not banned the weapons.

    A video posted to YouTube by activists from Quseir, Syria shows ZAB 2.5 incendiary submunitions burning in the playground of the Ghaleb Radi school following an airstrike on December 3, 2012. ゥ 2012 Private

    “We’re disturbed that Syria has apparently begun using incendiary munitions, as these weapons cause especially cruel civilian suffering and extensive property destruction when used in populated areas,” said Steve Goose, Arms division director at Human Rights Watch. “Syria should stop using incendiary weapons in acknowledgment of the devastating harm this weapon causes.”

    Incendiary weapons can contain any number of flammable substances, including napalm, thermite, or white phosphorus and are designed to set fire to objects or to cause burn injuries. They are not chemical weapons, which kill and incapacitate by the toxic properties of the chemicals released.

    Incendiary weapons produce extremely painful burns, often down to the bone, and can also cause respiratory damage. The burns are difficult to treat, especially in conflict areas lacking adequate medical facilities, and the treatment itself can be excruciating. Permanent scarring and disfigurement can lead to social ostracism. Incendiary weapons also cause fires to infrastructure due to their broad area effect, which means they cannot be used in a way that discriminates between soldiers and civilians in populated areas.

    Since mid-November, the use of incendiary weapons has been reported in at least four locations: Daraya in Damascus, Maarat al-Numan in Idlib, Babila in Damascus, and Quseir in Homs. An activist told Human Rights Watch that four adults, including two Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters, were wounded during an airstrike using incendiary weapons in Maarat al-Numan on November 28. According to two local activists and video footage, approximately 20 civilians including women and children were wounded on December 3 by an airstrike on a school and neighboring homes in Quseir that apparently involved incendiary weapons. A home in Daraya also appears to have been hit by incendiary weapons, based on local residents and footage reviewed.

    Human Rights Watch is investigating unconfirmed reports of the use of incendiary weapons in other parts of Syria.

    Human Rights Watch has identified remnants of at least two types of air-dropped incendiary bombs on videos recently posted by activists. Markings on the remnants identify them as ZAB-series incendiary aircraft bombs (Zazhigatelnaya Aviatsionnaya Bomba) made by the Soviet Union. The first type is a ZAB-100/105, a 100 kilogram (220 pound) bomb. The second type is an RBK-250 ZAB-2.5 bomb that releases 48 incendiary ZAB 2.5 submunitions over an area the size of a football field. The specific type of substance contained in these submunitions is believed to be the flammable substance thermite, according to a technical analysis provided by the independent arms expert Nic Jenzen-Jones. Thermite is used only for its incendiary effect and not for marking, obscuring, illumination or other purposes.

    Reported Use in Daraya in Damascus

    Based on the account of a witness, the first documented use of an incendiary weapon occurred on November 16. An activist in the Damascus suburb of Daraya, which had been heavily bombarded by Syrian forces in recent weeks, told Human Rights Watch that he filmed several videos showing ZAB incendiary submunitions being dropped on Daraya:

    Warplanes began bombing Daraya with these flammable bombs on November 16 – that was the first time we saw these bombs. I saw MiG warplanes releasing small bombs that would catch fire while they were still in the air and keep on releasing some kind of gas (sic., smoke) after it comes in contact with a building or ground. The gas-like material it produces has a very bad smell, like an acidic, metallic smell…
    On December 1 at around 10 a.m., I was with other activists in the media center when we heard a MiG warplane circling above us. When we went outside, we saw the warplane releasing a very big bomb, which produced an explosion, and then the bomb released things like fireballs producing smaller explosions. I saw four of these fireballs. One of the fireballs hit the street right next to the media center, just 50 meters away. The destruction wasn’t very big as it hit the street, but it did cause a hole to burn in the street.


    A picture of the “fireball” that fell next to the media center on December 1 clearly shows the remains of a ZAB-2.5 incendiary submunition. According to the activist interviewed by Human Rights Watch, a MiG airplane released incendiary weapons again on December 2 on Daraya. He filmed footage from that attack, which according to him caused no casualtiesand posted a video showing a residential home on fire. Both the RBK-250 bomb as well as the ZAB-2.5 submunitions are visible in the footage.

    Three other videos uploaded by the same Daraya YouTube channel “Daraya4Media,” associated with the Local Council of Daraya’s Media Center, also show the remains of burned-out incendiary ZAB submunitions in what appears to be a residential neighborhood. An apartment burned by the submunitions is visible in the video.

    Reported Use in Maarat al-Numan town in Idlib

    Human Rights Watch has analyzed a video posted from the town of Maarat al-Numan in Idlib province on November 20, showing an airplane dropping what appears to be ZAB-2.5 submunitions. Two other videos show ZAB-2.5 submunitions burning on the ground near an apartment building and other buildings on the main Citadel Road on the western outskirts of Maarat al-Numan.

    The videos were posted on the official YouTube channel of the information office of the Revolutionary Command Council of Maarat al-Numan, a channel that has been posting videos from the town showing Syrian military attacks. The cameraman in each video repeatedly states that the videos were being recorded in Maarat al-Numan. Human Rights Watch used satellite imagery to confirm that the two videos were filmed on Citadel Road of Maarat al-Numan.

    A video activist in Maarat al-Numan confirmed to Human Rights Watch that he had filmed some of the videos that were uploaded to the YouTube channel “thesyrianrevolution.” He told Human Rights Watch:
    I was in Maarat al-Numan when the three attacks occurred on November 20, 21, and 28. November 20 was the first time I saw this kind of bomb being used. They are very strange: they ignite in the air and in turn produce fire before they reach the ground.
    On November 28, I saw a MiG warplane dropping a big bomb that split in half, causing a big explosion. We thought that was it, but then we saw smaller bombs light on fire just a few meters after the canister released them. The fire bombs were falling quickly. The bombs did not fall in the same place: they spread over about 200 or 300 meters. When the bombs hit the ground we heard a series of small explosions. Then when we went to see the area of impact we saw the bombs producing white smoke.
    Some of the [bomblets] fell on the streets between the buildings and others fell in empty fields. Four people were wounded in the street: two civilians and two FSA soldiers.
    Reported Use in Quseir town in Homs

    A video uploaded on December 3 from the town of Quseir in Homs province shows what appears to be an airstrike involving incendiary submunitions filmed from a distance while another video shows burning ZAB-2.5 submunitions on the ground of Ghaleb Radi school in the center of Quseir. Both videos were uploaded by the YouTube channel “qmediacenter” of the Quseir Media Center. Using satellite imagery, Human Rights Watch has located the school shown in the video.



    A local activist in Quseir told Human Rights Watch:
    The bombs hit a school called “Ghaleb Radi” Al Rifiat and several residential buildings next to it. The bombs were different than the cluster bombs. They caught fire as they were going down from the MiG warplane. I heard a big explosion and several smaller ones. We saw smoke in the air and when we arrived to the Al Rifiyat street I saw at least nine houses on fire.
    Then when I reached the school I saw at least seven bombs burning on the playground and releasing white smoke that had a terrible smell. People were helping the families in the buildings that were on fire. When I went to the field hospital there were at least 20 wounded people that included women and children. I saw at least three of them severely burned like I have never seen before.
    The houses of Al Drisse, Ismael, and Rahmet were burnt. Members of the families I listed were among the injured people. I saw three of them burnt. I am sure that there was much more but I clearly I remember I saw a 17-year-old boy with burn in his back, an older man with burn in his left leg and his chest but from the right side. The third case was also a man but I don’t clearly remember where his injuries were. The three of them were from one of the families.


    According to the activist, there was no activity by the armed opposition group, the Free Syrian Army, in the school, a single-story building. A second activist from Qusair confirmed to Human Rights Watch that at least 19 civilians were injured in the strike, and at least eight homes were severely burned by the incendiary submunitions.

    Reported Use in Babila district of Damascus

    A video apparently from the Babila district of Damascus posted on December 3 showed a Syrian warplane circling overhead, and then showed the remains of an RBK-250 ZAB-2.5 canister near an apartment building on fire in a densely built-up area, with burning ZAB 2.5 submunitions visible on the road adjacent to the burning apartment building. Throughout the video, the cameraman repeatedly states that he is filming in Babila district of Damascus, and the video was uploaded with an Arabic emblem with “Babila” superimposed.

    Reported Use in Other Locations

    On December 6, a video posted by the official YouTube channel of the Deir al-Zour Press and another video posted by “derrevolutio11,” both organizations associated with the opposition, shows the remnants of several RBK-250 bombs as well as burned-out ZAB 2.5 submunitions. Human Rights Watch has no further information about the location of that strike, although a video posted by activists claims to show a helicopter-dropped ZAB munitions strike in Deir-Zour.

    A unitary ZAB-100/105 bomb that was air-dropped but apparently failed to explode was reported by the camera operator to have been filmed in al-Bab in Aleppo district, in what appears to be a populated area. The video was posted on November 29 by “albabforall,” a YouTube channel frequently used by video activists in al-Bab.

    Another video posted to YouTube by “AENNetwork” on November 21 showed remnants of RBK-250 canistersand a ZAB 2.5 incendiary submunition reportedly found in the village of Qobtan al-Jabal in Aleppo province.

    Syria has not joined the 1980 Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW), which has a protocol on incendiary weapons. A total 106 nations have joined CCW Protocol III, which bans the use of air-delivered incendiary weapons in areas with “concentrations of civilians.” Human Rights Watch has been working to strengthen existing international law on incendiary weapons.

    Syria is not known to be a producer or exporter of incendiary weapons. The size of its stockpile of incendiary weapons is not known, but is thought to be of Soviet origin.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  18. #678
    Super Moderator Malsua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,980
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    Bashir is breaking out the Willie Pete? He must be just about done.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


  19. #679
    Expatriate American Patriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    A Banana Republic, Central America
    Posts
    48,597
    Thanks
    78
    Thanked 27 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    CIA gives him a couple more weeks, tops.
    Libertatem Prius!


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 15 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




  20. #680
    Creepy Ass Cracka & Site Owner Ryan Ruck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    24,464
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts

    Default Re: Syria

    When I read your post Rick about SCUDs with incendiary warheads, I figured it was WP.

    I've got no problem with militaries using WP in warfare but using them in heavier weapons like SCUDs indiscriminately against civilians is completely different. I know how the left likes to piss and moan when Israel uses it in precision strikes against terrorists so I await with baited breath for them to as loudly cry about Assad using it far less judiciously.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •